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I have a question regarding this. statement. Let's say I have this code right here (very stupid and useless but gets the message across):

class Calculate{
int x,y;
final int g = 5;

   //Constructor
   public Calculate(int a, int b) {
      x = a; y = b;
   }

   public int sumAddG() {
     return (x+y+g);
   }

   //comparing method
   public boolean same(Calculate in) {
     if(this.sumAddG() == in.sumAddG()) { // <-- This is what I am curious about
       return true;
     } else {
       return false;
   }
}

So do I have this code right? When I am using this.SumAddG() - Am I referring to the result of the method SumAddG() using the instance variables of this class instance?

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8  
You can't use the this keyword in a static context. This will give a compile error. –  Kevin DiTraglia Nov 4 '13 at 13:15
    
Okay, removed the static ^^ Now? –  Chris Dobkowski Nov 4 '13 at 13:17
    
static still there!! –  hasan83 Nov 4 '13 at 13:18
    
a static compare method with only one parameter does not make much sense... –  helb Nov 4 '13 at 13:19
    
aaaaaaaa! >.< changed it :D –  Chris Dobkowski Nov 4 '13 at 13:20

6 Answers 6

up vote 4 down vote accepted

this refers to the actual instance whose same() method has been invoked. Eg. take the following code:

Calculate a = new Calculate(0, 3);
Calculate b = new Calculate(0, 4);
boolean calcFlag = a.same(b);

In this case the this in the method same() will refer to a while in will refer to b.

Update for this line: if(this.sumAddG() == in.sumAddG()) { // <-- This is what I am curious about

you have a boolean method. In if you're evaluating a boolean expression and you return a boolean true value if the expression itself is true. This can be simplified by simply writing

return this.sumAddG() == in.sumAddG();

This will return directly the evaluation of the two instance's equality. Generally, it is considered good practice in case of boolean methods to evaluate the expression in the return line, while evaluating it in an

if (<*any boolean expression*>) {
  return true;
} else {
  return false;
}

structure is considered bad practice.

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So if I let's say want to refer to the calculation of the method using the variables in the current instance of this class is simply write if(Calculate.sumAddG() == in.sumAddG()){then}...? –  Chris Dobkowski Nov 4 '13 at 13:25
1  
Calculate is the name of the class, of which a is an instance, and b is another one. As sumAddG() is not static, you can't invoke Calculate.sumAddG(), only a.sumAddG() and b.sumAddG() (or this.sumAddG() and in.sumAddG() respectively, if you're inside the method body of same(). Consider the different instances as origins of distinct intertiae. If you invoke a.same(b), inside a.same() this refers to a and in refers to b. However if you invoke b.same(a), b will be referred to by this and a will be referred to by in. –  András Hummer Nov 4 '13 at 13:34
    
So given the above code, if I type: a.same(b); I will compare A to B, where b.same(a) I will compare B to A, (practically same but different things going behind the scenes with thi. implementation right?) –  Chris Dobkowski Nov 4 '13 at 13:46
    
Yes, that's correct. Usually, that's why equals() method of Object is overridden, to declare when two objects are considered semantically equal. –  András Hummer Nov 4 '13 at 13:48
    
Ooooohhhhhh, that's what's up with the equals() method :D Thank you very very much! ^^ –  Chris Dobkowski Nov 4 '13 at 13:52

You have multiple issues in the code:

  1. You are using this. in a static method: this. refers to the current instance of your class (the Calculate instance you're in), and static method belongs to the class, not the instance
  2. You are referring to sumAddG() as a property member (in.SumAddG), which is wrong because SumAddG is a method.

In your example, you would use this. if you wish to call the method in your own class instance, but if you wish to call it on another instance in, then you would call it as in.sumAddG().

In static methods, you cannot use this because a static member does not belong to an instance, it belongs to the class, hence there is no recognition of this, as current instance does not exist.

However, if you have a method in the same class and you'd like to call it from a static method, the other method would have to be static as well, and you can call it as: Calculate.MyStaticMethod().

Had your method not been static, then this.sumAddG() == in.sumAddG() would actually compare the return value from calling sumAddG() in your instance, and sumAddG() on in instance.

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The current state of your code (your edits are hard to follow) works as you probably expect.

this refers to the instance of the class you are in, so this.sumAddG()'s result uses the above fields current values. in.sumAddG() uses the fields of the instance in, which is specified as a parameter of the method same().

REMOTELY RELATED:

FYI, the use of this here is not needed, as its the default behaviour of the plain call sumAddG(). This means that your if statement could be:

if (sumAddG() == in.sumAddG()) { ... }
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Great one! Thanks a lot!!!! :D –  Chris Dobkowski Nov 4 '13 at 13:49

The this keyword refers to the current class you are in. So in that example class you wrote, if you declare an instances variable, Calculate in. Then in the IF statement condition you would refer to it by putting the this keyword in front of it like: this.in and to refer to the method's parameter by just calling: in

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The this keyword refers to an instance of the class you're using it in.

In the example you've shown this.sumAddG() would be referring to the method of an instance of the class Calculate. Since you're referring to a class instance you cannot use this from a static context.

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So if I let's say want to refer to the calculation of the method using the variables in the current instance of this class is simply write if(Calculate.sumAddG() == in.sumAddG()){then}...? –  Chris Dobkowski Nov 4 '13 at 13:28
    
Using Calculate.sumAddG() would not work unless the class calculate was Static. What you can do is create an instance of the class if you want to call the method from outside the class. Your updated code without the static method should work, from what I can see, but I haven't tested it. Also in you can remove 'this' and it should work just the same. –  Barlak Nov 4 '13 at 13:35

this always refers to the class instance. this.method() has nothing to do with the return value. some method have no values to return.

It mean: please compiler call this class instance membered method for me.

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2  
This does not provide an answer to the question. To critique or request clarification from an author, leave a comment below their post. –  DesertIvy Nov 4 '13 at 13:40

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