Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

So out of curiosity and idle boredom, I was fooling around with benchmarking Shlemiel the painter's algorithm. I started with a blank string, created another one of 1000 blank spaces, and started adding one to the other, using plain old inefficient string concatenation, timing how long it took each time.

string s1 = "";
string s2 = "";
while (s2.Length < 1000)
{
    s2 += " ";
}

while (true)
{
    Stopwatch sw = Stopwatch.StartNew();
    s1 += s2;
    sw.Stop();

    Console.WriteLine(" {0}| {1}", s1.Length, sw.ElapsedMilliseconds);
}

As expected, the longer the string got, the longer it took to concatenate (it was a much smaller impact than I expected, but that's another question for another day). What was surprising, however, was consistent spikes in the time it took. Every sixth concatenation took roughly two to three times as long as the five preceding concatenations.

 Length     | Time (ms)
 -----------------------
 32250000   | 117
 32251000   | 44
 32252000   | 31
 32253000   | 30
 32254000   | 30
 32255000   | 32
 32256000   | 129
 32257000   | 35
 32258000   | 43
 32259000   | 34
 32260000   | 30
 32261000   | 29
 32262000   | 107
 32263000   | 47
 32264000   | 29
 32265000   | 30
 32266000   | 31
 32267000   | 29
 32268000   | 110
 32269000   | 46
 32270000   | 31
 32271000   | 30
 32272000   | 30
 32273000   | 30
 32274000   | 113

These samples are from once the string started getting significantly large, but the pattern holds from the start. Largely the first thousand or so samples are too small to notice the pattern, but around the 1.8k mark it's recognizable.

My first assumption was that behind the scenes, the characters were being stored in some sort of ArrayList/vector type deal, which doubles in size once it's full, but as I thought about it more, that doesn't fit - if that were the case, spike would come in exponential periods, rather than linear.

So, in short: what the hell is going on here?

share|improve this question
    
Probably garbage collection. Try running a profiler if you're really interested; I'm afraid we can't but guess. –  CodeCaster Nov 4 '13 at 15:09
    
Is the GC consistent enough to occur exactly every sixth iteration (assuming it's that consistent for the entire data set)? –  Polynomial Nov 4 '13 at 15:17
    
Not sure why this deserved a down vote, but whatever. –  mikeTheLiar Nov 4 '13 at 15:59
add comment

1 Answer

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Creating strings and discarding them creates garbage. Once you've used a certain amount of memory, garbage collections occurs and pauses your process. Since nothing else is going on in your process and you always make your strings the same length, GC always happens at the same time (every 6th run).

To avoid this effect on your timing, call GC.Collect before starting the timer on each run.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.