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Preface

There's an SSCCE linked below.

I have defined a template class which declares a nested class in my program. The template works for many different datatypes (namely the ones which are overloaded by std::ostream::operator <<. I now want to use this template with a type that does not work with it because the type is not overloaded in std::ostream::operator <<. I do not want to add another overloaded method.

So this is the basic interface:

class Value;

class Datatype {

public:

    virtual std::string to_string(Value* value) = 0;

};

class Value {

    Datatype* m_type;

public:

    Value(Datatype* type) : m_type(type) { }

    std::string to_string() {
        return m_type->to_string(this);
    }

};

What the WrapValueImpl template class does (see below), is to deliver a Value and Datatype implementation in one.

template <typename T>
class WrapValueImpl : public Value {

    T m_val;

public:

    WrapValueImpl(Datatype* type) : Value(type) { }

    T& get() {
        return m_val;
    }

    static T& get(Value* value) {
        return static_cast<WrapValueImpl*>(value)->get();
    }

    static void set(Value* value, const T& other) {
        get(value) = other;
    }

    class Type : public ::Datatype {

    public:

        virtual std::string to_string(Value* value) {
            std::ostringstream stream;
            stream << WrapValueImpl::get(value);
            return stream.str();
        }

    };

};

Example usage:

typedef WrapValueImpl<int> IntValue;

int main() {
    IntValue::Type t;
    IntValue v(&t);
    IntValue::set(&v, 42);

    std::cout << v.to_string() << "\n"; // prints 42
    return 0;
}

All fine so far, this is exactly what I want.

The Problem

But now, I want to use the WrapValueImpl with a typename that is not supported in std::ostream::operator <<. Please note again that I do not want to add support for the << operator.

Much rather, I want to overwrite the Type class in the WrapValueImpl to implement the proper string conversion.

typedef std::vector<Value*> ValueArray;
class ArrayValue : public WrapValueImpl<ValueArray> {

public:

    ArrayValue(Datatype* type) : WrapValueImpl<ValueArray>(type) { }

    class Type : public WrapValueImpl<ValueArray>::Type {

    public:

        virtual std::string to_string(Value* value) {
            std::ostringstream stream;
            stream << "[";

            ValueArray& array = ArrayValue::get(value);
            ValueArray::const_iterator it = array.begin();
            for (; it != array.end(); it++) {
                stream << (*it)->to_string() << ", ";   
            }
            stream << "]";
            return stream.str();
        }

    };

};

But it doesn't compile at all. The compiler yields errors as if I was using the original WrapValueImpl<ValueArray>::Type class instead of the ArrayValue::Type class. I did however make tests and inserted prints in Type::to_string() and the correct method is called (the method of the overwritten class).

(SSCCE) But it actually uses the correct Type class ...

In the following snippet on Coliru, you can find a full working example of what I am talking about. You can switch the USE_ARRAY macro to see the results of using the ArrayValue class.

http://coliru.stacked-crooked.com/a/820e2f2550a8363e

In this example, I also prove that the compiler actually chooses the correct nested Type class, yet it complains about the original implementation. Why does it bother when it actually does not use the type?

share|improve this question
    
Please see my updated question, I've added a link to a new snippet which proves that the compiler actually uses the correct nested Type class. Yet it complains about the implementation of the original class. –  Niklas R Nov 4 '13 at 16:36
    
I'm likely missing something basic, but why would you expect WrapValueImpl to have any clue at all that ArrayValue exposes Type, when WrapValueImpl itself has no knowledge of the derivation to ArrayValue ? In other words, the original class, WrapValueImpl::Type is the only one it knows anything about, and you've provided no means to change that dynamically that I can see. –  WhozCraig Nov 4 '13 at 16:55
    
The code will choose the correct Type however the base type from WrapValueImpl was already added into existence by the compiler and it's existence is not compatible with std::vector –  Raxvan Nov 4 '13 at 17:00
    
You should be specializing WrapValueImpl<ValueArray>, not inheriting from it. –  Ben Voigt Apr 4 '14 at 1:01

1 Answer 1

The problem is that when you define Type in ArrayValue like this public WrapValueImpl<ValueArray>::Type then the compiler will instanciate the Type from the WrapValueImpl impl. Type defined in WrapValueImpl uses operator << on the templated type T and because he doesn't have operator << for T it will throw errors.

One way to fix this is to use operators for your value type:

std::ostringstream& operator << (std::ostringstream& stream,const ValueArray & va);

class ArrayValue : public WrapValueImpl<ValueArray> {

public:

    ArrayValue(Datatype* type) : WrapValueImpl<ValueArray>(type) { }

};

std::ostringstream& operator << (std::ostringstream& stream,const ValueArray & array)
{
    stream << "[";

    ValueArray::const_iterator it = array.begin();
    for (; it != array.end(); it++) {
        stream << (*it)->to_string() << ", ";   
    }
    stream << "]";
    return stream;
};

And just don't define the Type in your ArrayValue class.

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