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Is there C++ equivalent for python Xrange generator in either STL or boost?

xrange basically generates incremented number with each call to ++ operator. the constructor is like this:

xrange(first, last, increment)

was hoping to do something like this using boost for each:

foreach(int i, xrange(N))

I. am aware of the for loop. in my opinion they are too much boilerplate.

Thanks

my reasons:

my main reason for wanting to do so is because i use speech to text software, and programming loop usual way is difficult, even if using code completion. It is much more efficient to have pronounceable constructs.

many loops start with zero and increment by one, which is default for range. I find python construct more intuitive

 for(int i = 0; i < N; ++i)
 foreach(int i, range(N))

functions which need to take range as argument:

 Function(int start, int and, int inc);
 function(xrange r);

I understand differences between languages, however if a particular construct in python is very useful for me and can be implemented efficiently in C++, I do not see a reason not to use it. For each construct is foreign to C++ as well however people use it.

I put my implementation at the bottom of the page as well the example usage.

in my domain i work with multidimensional arrays, often rank 4 tensor. so I would often end up with 4 nested loops with different ranges/increments to compute normalization, indexes, etc. those are not necessarily performance loops, and I am more concerned with correctness readability and ability to modify.

for example

int function(int ifirst, int ilast, int jfirst, int jlast, ...);
versus
int function(range irange, range jrange, ...);

In the above, if different strids are needed, you have to pass more variables, modify loops, etc. eventually you end up with a mass of integers/nearly identical loops.

foreach and range solve my problem exactly. familiarity to average C++ programmer is not high on my list of concerns - problem domain is a rather obscure, there is a lot of meta-programming, SSE intrinsic, generated code.

share|improve this question
3  
Most C++ programmers probably won't know what Xrange does - you should briefly describe it in your question. –  anon Dec 29 '09 at 22:36
4  
As far as I can tell, you'd just use a for-loop: for (int i = 0; i < N; ++i) { /* use i */ } –  GManNickG Dec 29 '09 at 22:42
6  
Your boilerplate argument is a bit hollow. for i in xrange(first, last, increment) is 40 chars. for(int i=first;i<last;i+=increment) is 37. 43 if you add spaces between operands and operators. And you would use either syntax in exactly the same situation in their respective languages. Don't try to turn C++ into Python, they both have different strengths and purposes. –  Chinmay Kanchi Dec 29 '09 at 22:56
    
For each is not "foreign to C++ as well". It is part of the standard library. –  jalf Dec 30 '09 at 19:41
2  
@jalf: std::for_each is a (near-useless, IMO) algorithm. We are talking about a real language construct (which will be added with C++0x, or is available as the BOOST_FOREACH macro. –  UncleBens Dec 30 '09 at 21:14

11 Answers 11

up vote 20 down vote accepted

Boost has counting_iterator as far as I know, which seems to allow only incrementing in steps of 1. For full xrange functionality you might need to implement a similar iterator yourself.

All in all it could look like this (edit: added an iterator for the third overload of xrange, to play around with boost's iterator facade):

#include <iostream>
#include <boost/iterator/counting_iterator.hpp>
#include <boost/range/iterator_range.hpp>
#include <boost/foreach.hpp>
#include <boost/iterator/iterator_facade.hpp>
#include <cassert>

template <class T>
boost::iterator_range<boost::counting_iterator<T> > xrange(T to)
{
    //these assertions are somewhat problematic:
    //might produce warnings, if T is unsigned
    assert(T() <= to);
    return boost::make_iterator_range(boost::counting_iterator<T>(0), boost::counting_iterator<T>(to));
}

template <class T>
boost::iterator_range<boost::counting_iterator<T> > xrange(T from, T to)
{
    assert(from <= to);
    return boost::make_iterator_range(boost::counting_iterator<T>(from), boost::counting_iterator<T>(to));
}

//iterator that can do increments in steps (positive and negative)
template <class T>
class xrange_iterator:
    public boost::iterator_facade<xrange_iterator<T>, const T, std::forward_iterator_tag>
{
    T value, incr;
public:
    xrange_iterator(T value, T incr = T()): value(value), incr(incr) {}
private:
    friend class boost::iterator_core_access;
    void increment() { value += incr; }
    bool equal(const xrange_iterator& other) const
    {
        //this is probably somewhat problematic, assuming that the "end iterator"
        //is always the right-hand value?
        return (incr >= 0 && value >= other.value) || (incr < 0 && value <= other.value);
    }
    const T& dereference() const { return value; }
};

template <class T>
boost::iterator_range<xrange_iterator<T> > xrange(T from, T to, T increment)
{
    assert((increment >= T() && from <= to) || (increment < T() && from >= to));
    return boost::make_iterator_range(xrange_iterator<T>(from, increment), xrange_iterator<T>(to));
}

int main()
{
    BOOST_FOREACH(int i, xrange(10)) {
        std::cout << i << ' ';
    }
    BOOST_FOREACH(int i, xrange(10, 20)) {
        std::cout << i << ' ';
    }
    std::cout << '\n';
    BOOST_FOREACH(int i, xrange(0, 46, 5)) {
        std::cout << i << ' ';
    }
    BOOST_FOREACH(int i, xrange(10, 0, -1)) {
        std::cout << i << ' ';
    }
}

As others are saying, I don't see this buying you much over a normal for loop.

share|improve this answer

Boost irange should really be the answer (ThxPaul Brannan)

I'm adding my answer to provide a compelling example of very valid use-cases that are not served well by manual looping:

#include <boost/range/adaptors.hpp>
#include <boost/range/algorithm.hpp>
#include <boost/range/irange.hpp>

using namespace boost::adaptors;

static int mod7(int v) 
    { return v % 7; }

int main() 
{
    std::vector<int> v;

    boost::copy(
            boost::irange(1,100) | transformed(mod7), 
            std::back_inserter(v));

    boost::sort(v);

    boost::copy(
            v | reversed | uniqued, 
            std::ostream_iterator<int>(std::cout, ", "));
}

Output: 6, 5, 4, 3, 2, 1, 0,

Note how this resembles generators/comprehensions (functional languages) and enumerables (C#)

Update I just thought I'd mention the following (highly inflexible) idiom that C++11 allows:

for (int x : {1,2,3,4,5,6,7})
    std::cout << x << std::endl;

of course you could marry it with irange:

for (int x : boost::irange(1,8))
    std::cout << x << std::endl;
share|improve this answer
1  
I changed your answer to use boost::irange instead of boost::make_integer_range. I hope you don't mind ;) –  Mankarse Nov 13 '11 at 10:49
    
@Mankarse I don't - Thanks for the update! I found out about that later and never came round to updating this answer (perhaps it was newer, AFAICT it was introduced with boost 1_43_0) –  sehe Nov 13 '11 at 11:40
    
Short and sweet and full of meat! Thanks for clearing the fog. –  3noch Jan 7 '14 at 21:23

my main reason for wanting to do so is because i use speech to text software, and programming loop usual way is difficult, even if using code completion. It is much more efficient to have pronounceable constructs.

That makes sense. But couldn't a simple macro solve this problem? #define for_i_to(N, body) for (int i = 0; i < N; ++i) { body }

or something similar. Or avoid the loop entirely and use the standard library algorithms. (std::for_each(range.begin(), rang.end(), myfunctor()) seems easier to pronounce)

many loops start with zero and increment by one, which is default for range. I find python construct more intuitive

You're wrong. The Python version is more intuitive to a Python programmer. And it may be more intuitive to a non-programmer. But you're writing C++ code. Your goal should be to make it intuitive to a C++ programmer. And C++ programmer know for-loops and they know the standard library algorithms. Stick to using those. (Or stick to writing Python)

functions which need to take range as argument:

Function(int start, int and, int inc);
function(xrange r);

Or the idiomatic C++ version:

template <typename iter_type>
void function(iter_type first, iter_type last);

In C++, ranges are represented by iterator pairs. Not integers. If you're going to write code in a new language, respect the conventions of that language. Even if it means you have to adapt and change some habits.

If you're not willing to do that, stick with the language you know.

Trying to turn language X into language Y is always the wrong thing to do. It own't work, and it'll confuse the language X programmers who are going to maintain (or just read) your code.

share|improve this answer
    
macros have problems of their own and i dislike using them for a number of reasons except for a few special cases. for_each requires too much extra code for my purposes. By your reasoning, one should not use much outside of the standard library, even if it makes his/her life easier. should they not use boost either? should they not use template expressions? I would bet majority of C++ programmers would have hard time parsing te programs, but it is hardly a reason not to use them. –  Anycorn Dec 30 '09 at 5:02
1  
No, by my reasoning, one should stick to the same style as used by the standard lbirray. (or Boost). I'm not saying "don't add anything to the language". I'm saying "Don't add something that runs contrary to what a C++ programmer expects". A C++ programmer expects a range to be represented by an iterator pair, not a homerolled "range" object. Macros have plenty of problems on their own, yes, but they might solve your specific problem: "I need a for loop, but they're hard to pronounce". That is all your question boils down to. –  jalf Dec 30 '09 at 12:26
1  
Insult? No, I answered your question as best I could. I don't see what matlab or fortran memory ordering has to do with how people expect a for loop in C++ to look. If you feel insulted by the message that "either you should use the language as it was intended to be used, or you should use a language that works the way you want", then you really need to grow some thicker skin. –  jalf Dec 30 '09 at 18:27
3  
But I'm not sure why you're so upset. All I'm saying is that "C++ has a for loop which does exactly what you need. It also has iterators, which are an idiomatic way to represent ranges. Since you're coming from Python, you're probably familiar with the Zen of Python. Remember the line that goes "There should be one-- and preferably only one --obvious way to do it"? So why exactly should we add another syntax for for loops, and another representation for ranges? Especially when it would break interoperability with existing code (which uses iterator pairs for ranges)? –  jalf Dec 30 '09 at 19:40
2  
Since we don't know what you're using the ranges for, it's impossible for any of us to contribute anything useful. "Oh yes, you could implement the range object you already wrote your code to expect". Gee, that's helpful, and tells you a lot you didn't already know. Why do you need the actual indices for your ranges? How many nested loops are you going to have? You've posed a question that is impossible to answer. Half the information we need is missing, and all your code is tailored to the answer you want to hear. And you get hysterical when people answer differnetly than you wanted. –  jalf Dec 31 '09 at 0:33

std::iota (not yet standardized) is kinda like range. Doesn't make things any shorter or clearer than an explicit for loop, though.

#include <algorithm>
#include <iostream>
#include <iterator>
#include <numeric>
#include <vector>
int main() {
    std::vector<int> nums(5);
    std::iota(nums.begin(), nums.end(), 1);
    std::copy(nums.begin(), nums.end(),
            std::ostream_iterator<int>(std::cout, " "));
    std::cout << std::endl;
    return 0;
}

Compile with g++ -std=c++0x; this prints "1 2 3 4 5 \n".

share|improve this answer

well, here is what i wrote, since there does not seem to be one. the generator does not use any internal storage besides single integer. range object can be passed around and used in nested loops.

there is a small test case.

#include "iostream"
#include "foreach.hpp"

#include "boost/iterator/iterator_categories.hpp"

struct range {

  struct iterator_type {
    typedef int value_type;
    typedef int difference_type;
    typedef boost::single_pass_traversal_tag iterator_category;
    typedef const value_type* pointer;
    typedef const value_type & reference;

    mutable value_type value;
    const difference_type increment;

    iterator_type(value_type value, difference_type increment = 0)
      : value(value), increment(increment) {}

    bool operator==(const iterator_type &rhs) const {
      return value >= rhs.value;
    }
    value_type operator++() const { return value += increment; }
    operator pointer() const { return &value; }
  };

  typedef iterator_type iterator;
  typedef const iterator_type const_iterator;

  int first_, last_, increment_;

  range(int last) : first_(0), last_(last), increment_(1) {}
  range(int first, int last, int increment = 1)
    : first_(first), last_(last), increment_(increment) {}

  iterator begin() const {return iterator(first_, increment_);}
  iterator end() const {return iterator(last_);}
};

int test(const range & range0, const range & range1){
  foreach(int i, range0) {
    foreach(int j, range1) {
      std::cout << i << " " << j << "\n";
    }
  }
}

int main() {
  test(range(6), range(3, 10, 3));
}
share|improve this answer
    
how is foreach implemented? And I assume that the ??'s were meant to be <<, right? –  jalf Dec 31 '09 at 0:41

Since I've started to use BOOST_FOREACH for all my iteration (probably a misguided idea, but that's another story), here's another use for aaa's range class:

std::vector<int> vec;
// ... fill the vector ...
BOOST_FOREACH(size_t idx, make_range(0, vec.size()))
{
  // ... do some stuff ...
}

(yes, range should be templatized so I can use user-defined integral types with it)

And here's make_range():

template<typename T>
range<T> make_range(T const & start, T const & end)
{
  return range<T>(start, end);
}

See also:

http://groups.google.com/group/boost-list/browse_thread/thread/3e11117be9639bd

and:

https://svn.boost.org/trac/boost/ticket/3469

which propose similar solutions.

And I've just found boost::integer_range; with the above example, the code would look like:

using namespace boost;
std::vector<int> vec;
// ... fill the vector ...
BOOST_FOREACH(size_t idx, make_integer_range(0, vec.size()))
{
  // ... do some stuff ...
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1 only for make_integer_range, which answers the question :) adding link –  sehe Aug 31 '11 at 10:30

The for loop handles that nearly automatically:

for(int loop=first;loop < last;loop += increment)
{
  /// Do Stuff.
}
share|improve this answer

What you're doing isn't go to work as efficiently as you intend. BOOST_FOREACH evaluates it's arguments only once. This means you need xrange to produce an iteratable container full of your values.

That is, it could look like this (note, could be more generic, like taking an advancement functor, etc.):

template <typename T>
std::vector<T> xrange(const T& pBegin, const T& pEnd)
{
    std::vector<T> v;

    for (T i = pBegin, i < pEnd; ++i)
    {
        v.push_back(i);
    }

    return v;
}

But all you've done is:

  1. Move the for-loop into a function,
  2. Wasted time and resources allocating a vector that will die shortly after

Rather, just use the for-loop directly, like I previously mentioned and other are mentioning.

If you're really against a loop (keep in mind you don't program to save keystrokes!), you could probably use a macro and some magic (untested):

#define FOR_N(v, s, e)  for (BOOST_AUTO(v, s); v < e; ++v)

#define for_n FOR_N // better looking

for_n(i, 0, N)
{
    // use i;
}

Of course now you have to include another file, and this code is :\

share|improve this answer
    
I have have considered this approach, but it does not work for me. i was thinking along the lines of function object with ++ operator. i have multiple nested loops, and regular loops make code very busy. –  Anycorn Dec 29 '09 at 22:56
1  
If you post the real code, we'll help you make it look nice. But this is C++, not Python, and a simple-for loop is far more efficient than what I've posted. –  GManNickG Dec 29 '09 at 23:00
    
i put implementation and example case at the bottom of discussion, last answer. –  Anycorn Dec 30 '09 at 3:33

You're trying to bring a python idiom into C++. That's unncessary. Use

for(int i=initVal;i<range;i+=increment) 
{ 
    /*loop body*/
}

to achieve this. In Python, the for(i in xrange(init, rng, increment)) form is necessary because Python doesn't provide a simple for loop, only a for-each type construct. So you can iterate only over a sequence or a generator. This is simply unnecessary and almost certainly bad practice in a language that provides a for(;;) syntax.

EDIT: As a completely non-recommended aside, the closest I can get to the for i xrange(first, last, inc) syntax in C++ is:

#include <cstdio>

using namespace std;

int xrange(unsigned int last, unsigned int first=0, unsigned int inc=1)
{
    static int i = first;
    return (i<last)?i+=inc:i=0;
}

int main()
{
    while(int i=xrange(10, 0, 1))
        printf("in loop at i=%d\n",i);
}

Not that while this loops the correct number of times, i varies from first+inc to last and NOT first to last-inc as in Python. Also, the function can only work reliably with unsigned values, as when i==0, the while loop will exit. Do not use this function. I only added this code here to demonstrate that something of the sort is indeed possible. There are also several other caveats and gotchas (the code won't really work for first!=0 on subsequent function calls, for example)

share|improve this answer
2  
ew... global static local variables –  sehe Aug 31 '11 at 9:54
    
@sehe: yes, it's extremely "ew..." ;) –  Chinmay Kanchi Aug 31 '11 at 10:20
    
@ChinmayKanchi:I think you're essentially suggesting that boost range adaptors are unnecessary. –  Syncopated Dec 25 '12 at 14:52
    
You successfully vilified this approach in C++, but it can be easily done without a static (e.g. iterators). –  3noch Jan 7 '14 at 21:22

Since we don't really know what you actually want to use this for, I'm assuming your test case is representative. And then plain simple for loops are a whole lot simpler and more readable:

int main() {
  for (int i = 0; i <= 6; ++i){
    for (int j = 3; j <= 10; j += 3){
      std::cout << i << " " << j << "\n";
    }
  }
}

A C++ programmer can walk in from the street and understand this function without having to look up complex classes elsewhere. And it's 5 lines instead of your 60. Of course if you have 400 loops exactly like these, then yes, you'd save some effort by using your range object. Or you could just wrap these two loops inside a helper function, and call that whenever you needed.

We don't really have enough information to say what's wrong with simple for loops, or what would be a suitable replacement. The loops here solve your problem with far less complexity and far fewer lines of code than your sample implementation. If this is a bad solution, tell us your requirements (as in what problem you need to solve, rather than "I want python-style loops in C++")

share|improve this answer

Keep it simple, make a stupid macro;

#define for_range(VARNAME, START, STOP, INCREMENT) \
for(int VARNAME = START, int STOP_ = STOP, INCREMENT_ = INCREMENT; VARNAME != STOP_; VARNAME += INCREMENT_)

and use as;

for_range(i, 10, 5, -1)
  cout << i << endl;
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