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I'm trying to rename all tif files in a folder and number them from 1 to x. Ex. initial filenames "image-2.tif" and "image-3.tif" would be rename "file1.tif" and "file2.tif".

Here is my code:

my $dirname = "../folder";
opendir (DIR, $dirname) or die "cannot open directory $dirname";
my @files = grep /.tif/, readdir DIR;
closedir (DIR);

my $basename = "file";
my $count = 1;
my $new;
foreach (@files) {
$new = "${basename}${count}.tif";
print "rename $_ ${basename}${count}.tif\n";
rename $_, $new;
$count++;
}

Although all files are read correctly, they are just not renamed.

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Did you check that you have permission to rename those files ? Your script works perfectly for me –  Jean Nov 4 '13 at 17:56
    
change my $dirname = "../folder"; to my $dirname = "../folder/"; –  michael501 Nov 4 '13 at 18:10
3  
The correct pattern is /[.]tif\z/ –  Sinan Ünür Nov 4 '13 at 18:20

3 Answers 3

You need to use a good path for your rename() function when you get the files from a different one. The module File::Spec can help to get it:

use File::Spec;

my $dirname = "../folder";
my $abs_path = File::Spec->rel2abs($dirname);

And:

foreach (@files) {
    $new = "${basename}${count}.tif";
    print "rename $_ ${basename}${count}.tif\n";
    rename File::Spec->catfile($abs_path, $_), File::Spec->catfile($abs_path, $new);
    $count++;
}
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I would suggest changing your line:

rename $_, $new;

...to something more like:

rename($_, $new) or warn "rename: $_: $new: $!\n";

...and you should be able to see why it isn't working -- since rename returns false upon failure (and $! will tell you why it failed).

Also, the target of your rename operation (in your case: $new) needs to include the directory component as well (otherwise, your attempting to move the files into the process's current working directory (probably not what you intended)).

Finally, I would suggest that, instead of hard-coding the value of $dirname to a relative path, you should accept it as a command line argument. This allows your script to be run from any $PWD. See @ARGV in the perlvar manpage and/or the builtin shift command.

Therefore, something like this:

my $dirname = shift; # Accept dirname as commandline argument
opendir (DIR, $dirname) or die "cannot open directory $dirname";
my @files = grep /\.tif$/, readdir DIR; # Escape regex meta-char (.) and anchor to end of string ($).
closedir (DIR);

my $basename = "file";
my $count = 1;
my $new;
foreach (@files) {
    $new = "${dirname}/${basename}${count}.tif"; # Include dirname in target path
    print "rename $_ $new\n";
    rename($_, $new) or warn "rename: $_: $new: $!\n"; #warn when rename fails
    $count++;
}
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up vote 0 down vote accepted

I finally found exactly what I was looking for. With the help of Tim Peoples's response. The simplest response would be:

my $dirname = "../folder";
opendir (DIR, $dirname) or die "cannot open directory $dirname";
my @files = grep /[.]tif\z/, readdir DIR; #corrected pattern based on Sinan Ünür's comment
closedir (DIR);

my $basename = "file";
my $count = 1;
my $new;
foreach (@files) {
$new = "${basename}${count}.tif";
print "rename $_ $new\n";
rename ("$dirname/$_", "$dirname/$new") or warn "rename: $_: $new: $!\n"; #directory name     added to both the original file name and new file name. Thanks to Tim for helping me found this error using warn.
$count++;
}
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