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When is it necessary to use use the flag -stdlib=libstdc++ for the compiler and linker when compiling with gcc?

Does the compiler automatically use libstdc++?

I am using gcc4.8.2 on Ubuntu 13.10 and I would like to use the c++11 standard. I already pass -std=c++11 to the compiler.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 13 down vote accepted

On Linux: In general, all commonly available linux distributions will use libstdc++ by default. If you want to compile c++11 code here, use one of:

  • g++ -std=c++11 input.cxx -o a.out
  • g++ -std=gnu++11 input.cxx -o a.out

On OS X before Mavericks: libstdc++ was the default. You could use libc++ (which included c++11 library support) by passing -stdlib=libc++. If you want to compile c++11 code here, use one of:

  • g++ -std=c++11 -stdlib=libc++ input.cxx -o a.out
  • g++ -std=gnu++11 -stdlib=libc++ input.cxx -o a.out
  • clang++ -std=c++11 -stdlib=libc++ input.cxx -o a.out
  • clang++ -std=gnu++11 -stdlib=libc++ input.cxx -o a.out

On OS X since Mavericks: libc++ is the default. You can use libstdc++ (which does not include c++11 library support) by passing -stdlib=libstdc++

  • clang++ -std=c++11 input.cxx -o a.out
  • clang++ -std=gnu++11 input.cxx -o a.out
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If I understand this correctly, then libstdc++ supports c++11 for linux but not OSX10.9. -> c++11 code on osx10.9 must be compiled/linked with -stdlib=libc++. –  Raymond Valdes Nov 4 '13 at 19:00
    
@raymondvaldes: That's correct. Apple refuses to distribute newer versions of libstdc++ that would contain C++11 support. –  Bill Lynch Nov 4 '13 at 20:56
    
Can I use libstdc++ with clang (not clang++)? –  hithwen Feb 8 at 16:53
    
@hithwen: libstdc++ is the C++ standard library. It doesn't make much sense to use it with clang instead of clang++. –  Bill Lynch Feb 8 at 19:37
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@hithwen: I don't think your problem is related to this answer. I'd recommend creating a new question to ask this. –  Bill Lynch Feb 9 at 14:40

The compiler uses the libstdc++ automatically, if you use the g++ frontend, not the gcc frontend.

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Indeed. Just to clarify: The OP asked "when compiling with gcc?". If one runs gcc on a bunch of .o files, then I think it assume they're just C programs and it doesn't link in any C++ stuff. But if you use g++ (or if you have any cpp files on the gcc command line), then I think it'll realise that stdc++ should be included. But I'm not too certain about this. Is this what you're saying? –  Aaron McDaid Nov 4 '13 at 18:57
    
To clarify my question, when I said gcc I meant the gnu compiler collection (as a whole). Since I'm talking about c++ code, then I would be using the g++ frontend. –  Raymond Valdes Nov 4 '13 at 19:30

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