Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I've tried to make a simple directive which displays a name and allows it to be change. When I put multiple directive on the name page they all seem to share the name attribute. What am I doing wrong?

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html ng-app="app">
<head>
<meta charset=utf-8 />
<title></title>

  <script src="http://code.angularjs.org/1.2.0-rc.3/angular.min.js"></script>
  <script src="http://code.angularjs.org/1.2.0-rc.3/angular-resource.min.js"></script>
  <script src="http://code.angularjs.org/1.2.0-rc.3/angular-animate.min.js"></script>
  <script>
    var app = angular.module('app', []);

    app.directive('person', function () {

    function link ($scope, elem, attrs, ctrl) {     

        $scope.name = "OLD"        

        $scope.setName = function() {
            $scope.name = 'NEW';
        }
    }

    return {
      restrict: 'E',
      replace: true,
      template: "<span>Current name = {{name}}<a href='' class='btn' ng-click='setName()'>Change name</a><br></span>",
      link : link,
    }

  });

  app.controller('MainCtrl', function ($scope) { });

  </script>    

</head>

<body ng-controller='MainCtrl'>
  <person></person><br>
  <person></person><br>
  <person></person><br>
  <person></person><br>
</body>

</html>
share|improve this question
    
All instances of your directive share the same scope since they don't use isolated scopes. Check-out the directives documentation, "Isolating the Scope of a Directive" paragraph –  Kos Prov Nov 4 '13 at 19:06

3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

As mentioned in previous answers, the default behavior of AngularJS directives is to share the scope that they are included in. This behavior is changed via the scope parameter in the directive definition object.

You can view the documentation for the scope argument in this section of the AngularJS documents: http://docs.angularjs.org/api/ng.$compile#description_comprehensive-directive-api_directive-definition-object

This argument has three options:

  1. scope: false - the default behavior of sharing the scope the directive is included in

  2. scope: true - create a new scope for the directive that acts like other child scopes and prototypically inherits from its parent scope

  3. scope: {} - create an isolated scope that does not prototypically inherit from its parent scope

As you can see with the JSBin examples, both options 2 and 3 will work for your example. The difference is whether you want your new scopes isolated or not.

The directives section of the AngularJS guide has a good section on why isolated scope can help create better reusable modules with directives: AngularJS Guide: Isolating the Scope of a Directive

share|improve this answer

By default if you don't isolate the scope of a directive you will share the "outside" scope with all instances of your person directive. With your current implementation you'd need to create a different controller each time in order to re-use such a directive.

BUT there is a solution to this flaw and it s called isolate scope. To do this, you can use a directive's scope option like so :

return {
  restrict: 'E',
  replace: true,
  scope : {} // where the magic happens
  template: "<span>Current name = {{name}}<a href='' class='btn' ng-click='setName()'>Change name</a><br></span>",
  link : link,
}

You have a complete example and explenation over here section Isolating the Scope of a Directive

share|improve this answer

By default, directives share the same scope. But if needed, you can use isolated scope for your directives: use scope: {} as field in your directive definition.

app.directive('person', function () {

    function link ($scope, elem, attrs, ctrl) {     

        $scope.name = "OLD"        

        $scope.setName = function() {
            $scope.name = 'NEW';
        }
    }

    return {
      restrict: 'E',
      scope: {}
      replace: true,
      template: "<span>Current name = {{name}}<a href='' class='btn' ng-click='setName()'>Change name</a><br></span>",
      link : link,
    }

  });
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.