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I am trying to split an int variable into two parts of arbitrary length (ie: splitting 32 bits into 31 and 1 bits, 30 and 2 bits, 16 and 16 bits, 1 and 31 bits etc).

I have tried to implement it using the bitwise shift operators, however cant seem to get it work correctly.

int botLength = 4;
int start = ~0;
int top = start << botLength;
int bottom = start - top;

std::cout << "Top:    " << std::bitset<32>(top) << std::endl;
std::cout << "Bottom: " << std::bitset<32>(bottom) << std::endl;

This outputs

Top:    11111111111111111111111111110000
Bottom: 00000000000000000000000000001111

Where as I want:

Top:    00001111111111111111111111111111
Bottom: 00000000000000000000000000001111    

I thought I could fix this by changing the code to the following:

int botLength = 4;
int start = ~0;
int top = start << botLength;
int bottom = start - top;
top = top >> botLength; //added this

std::cout << "Top:    " << std::bitset<32>(top) << std::endl;
std::cout << "Bottom: " << std::bitset<32>(bottom) << std::endl;

However this seems to add 1s as the padding, as it outputs this:

Top:    11111111111111111111111111111111
Bottom: 00000000000000000000000000001111

Can anyone suggest a way to fix this?

share|improve this question
    
I think using unsigned int would do the trick, but I'm not totally sure. – George Nov 4 '13 at 19:06
    
Just for fun, std::cout << start << std::endl. I think you may be surprised by the result. – WhozCraig Nov 4 '13 at 19:09
    
prints -1, but I'm still confused as to why using unsigned instead fixes it. Doesn't unsigned just tell the compiler how to interpret the data? The actual binary should still be affected in the same way with << and >> (at least that's what I thought, but it evidently doesn't ;) ) – jtedit Nov 4 '13 at 19:13
up vote 2 down vote accepted

You should use unsigned values such as uint32_t to fix your problem. Make variable top unsigned.


Variable top is signed in your code

int botLength = 4;
int start = ~0;
int top = start << botLength;

Above code puts a negative value in top, then the sign bit at the leftmost place (the most significant bit) is 1.

int bottom = start - top;
top = top >> botLength;

After each shift to right to keep the sign, sign bit will set to 1 again. So, you have all bits 1.


In summery, compiler tries to keep the sign of a signed integer value after each shifting operation. So, this mechanism affects your algorithm and you'll not get correct result.

share|improve this answer
    
It does :) But now I'm curious, why? – jtedit Nov 4 '13 at 19:10
    
Because if you use signed ints and the most significant bit is 1, then if you shift the value to the right you will get 1s instead of 0s in the most significant bits. – George Nov 4 '13 at 19:14

Because in C and C++ int is treated as a signed number, the right shift operator copies the most significant bit, which indicates the sign. Signed numbers are encoded in Two's complement.

You should switch to unsigned to get the highest bit cleared when shifting right, or you can also use a cast on the fly, for example:

unsigned bits = 1;
int s = -1;
s = s >> bits;

int u = -1;
u = unsigned(u) >> bits;

after this, s will be -1 (0xFFFFFFFF), whereas u will be 2147483647 (0x7FFFFFFF)

share|improve this answer

The most significant bit of a signed value indicates whether the value is negative or positive. As M M. indicates, if you right shift a negative number, the operation extends the sign bit into the high order bits.

Division by 2 is equivalent to right shifting one bit. If you divide -4 by 2, you would expect to get -2, not 6 which is what I think you would get if you didn't extend the sign.

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