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I have a server that makes a child thread for every user that connects to the server.The child server class has the run method and other methods.

One method searches a mysql database with select.

Another method updates the databases.

How can I block the method that searches the database when another thread uses the method that updates the database ?

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1  
Have you read docs.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/essential/concurrency ? –  Taylor Nov 4 '13 at 19:30
    
it seems the client will be unhappy waiting the method that searches the database when another thread uses the method that updates the database –  nikpon Nov 4 '13 at 19:33
    
Are you asking this because the query is pulling partially update results or for some other reason? –  Gray Nov 4 '13 at 19:55

3 Answers 3

The proper way to handle your requirement is to do all database operations within a transaction. This will avoid any need of the mutual exclusion of database code and will also guarantee isolation between your Java process and any other database client doing its own operations.

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Best way to do this is database transaction and proper isolation level.

Below are some isolation levels in MySql:

Read uncommitted

Read committed

Repeatable reads

Serializable

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Not sure if you have a good design doing this, but if you want mutex on a method, declare the method as synchronized like

public synchronized void putInDbase(String value) {
  //only one thread will execute here at a time
}

But if you have two seperate methods within the same class, you want to synchronize the actual code dealing with the database, you can make synchronized blocks

public class myDbase {
     public void search() {

    synchronized(this) {
     //database code
    }

}

public void update() {

   synchronized(this) {
      //database code
   }

}

}
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That only works if the instance of the class containing that method is shared, which is unclear from the question. –  Taylor Nov 4 '13 at 19:30
    
Very true statement. @Emil see this docs.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/essential/concurrency/… –  75inchpianist Nov 4 '13 at 19:31

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