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Ok this looks like a major fundamental bug in .NET:

Consider the following simple program, which purposely tries to connect to a non-existent database:

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {            

        Thread threadOne = new Thread(GetConnectionOne);
        Thread threadTwo = new Thread(GetConnectionTwo);            
        threadOne.Start();
        threadTwo.Start();

    }



    static void GetConnectionOne()
    {
        try
        {
            using (SqlConnection conn = new SqlConnection("Data Source=.\\wfea;Initial Catalog=zc;Persist Security Info=True;Trusted_Connection=yes;"))
            {
                conn.Open();
            }    
        } catch (Exception e)
        {
            File.AppendAllText("ConnectionOneError.txt", e.Message + "\n" + e.StackTrace + "\n");
        }

    }


    static void GetConnectionTwo()
    {
        try
        {
            using (SqlConnection conn = new SqlConnection("Data Source=.\\wfea;Initial Catalog=zc;Persist Security Info=True;Trusted_Connection=yes;"))
            {
                conn.Open();
            }
        }
        catch (Exception e)
        {
            File.AppendAllText("ConnectionTwoError.txt", e.Message + "\n" + e.StackTrace + "\n");
        }

    }
}

Run this program and set breakpoints on the catch blocks. The DBConnection object will attempt to connect for 15 seconds (on both threads), then it will throw an error. Inspect the exception's stack trace, and the stack trace will have TWO call stacks intermingled, as follows:

at System.Data.ProviderBase.DbConnectionPool.CreateObject(DbConnection owningObject)
at System.Data.ProviderBase.DbConnectionFactory.GetConnection(DbConnection owningConnection)
at System.Data.ProviderBase.DbConnectionClosed.OpenConnection(DbConnection outerConnection, DbConnectionFactory connectionFactory)
at System.Data.ProviderBase.DbConnectionPool.UserCreateRequest(DbConnection owningObject)
at System.Data.ProviderBase.DbConnectionPool.GetConnection(DbConnection owningObject)
at System.Data.SqlClient.SqlConnection.Open()
at ZoCom2Test.Program.GetConnectionOne() in C:\src\trunk\ZTest\Program.cs:line 38
at System.Data.ProviderBase.DbConnectionFactory.GetConnection(DbConnection owningConnection)
at System.Data.ProviderBase.DbConnectionClosed.OpenConnection(DbConnection outerConnection, DbConnectionFactory connectionFactory)
at System.Data.SqlClient.SqlConnection.Open()
at ZoCom2Test.Program.GetConnectionTwo() in C:\src\trunk\ZTest\Program.cs:line 54

You may have to try it several times to get this to happen, but I'm getting this to happen right now on my machine. How is this possible? This should be totally impossible at the VM level. It looks like the DBConnection.Open() function is simultaneously throwing the same exception on two threads at once, or something bizarre like that.

share|improve this question
6  
I would be careful about crying "bug". Usually when something doesn't conform to my preconceived notions about how it's supposed to behave, it's my preconceptions that are wrong and have to change. I'm betting that's the case for you as well. –  duffymo Dec 29 '09 at 23:40
2  
What happens if you take the RNG out of the equation and set GetCOnnectionOne and GetConnectionTwo to log to 2 distinct (and hardcoded) filenames? Do they intermingle then? –  Joe Dec 29 '09 at 23:41
12  
The idea that there's a fundamental bug in .NET after all this time, and that you're the one to find it should make you stop and think. –  John Saunders Dec 29 '09 at 23:42
5  
You're probably wrong. Comparing your knowledge of threading (as displayed here) to Microsoft's knowledge of threading leads directly to that conclusion. –  John Saunders Dec 29 '09 at 23:50
2  
If we're supposed to forget about the "random filename generation" you could go back and edit, you know. –  Esteban Araya Dec 30 '09 at 0:00
show 20 more comments

4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Try this instead, and see what happens:

class ThreadingBug
{
    private const string CONNECTION_STRING =
        "Data Source=.\\wfea;Initial Catalog=catalog;Persist Security Info=True;Trusted_Connection=yes;";

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        try
        {
            Thread threadOne = new Thread(GetConnectionOne);
            Thread threadTwo = new Thread(GetConnectionTwo);
            threadOne.Start();
            threadTwo.Start();

            threadOne.Join(2000);
            threadTwo.Join(2000);
        }
        catch (Exception e)
        {
            File.AppendAllText("Main.txt", e.ToString());
        }
    }

    static void GetConnectionOne()
    {
        try
        {
            using (SqlConnection conn = new SqlConnection(CONNECTION_STRING))
            {
                conn.Open();
            }
        }
        catch (Exception e)
        {
            File.AppendAllText("GetConnectionOne.txt", e.ToString());
        }
    }

    static void GetConnectionTwo()
    {
        try
        {
            using (SqlConnection conn = new SqlConnection(CONNECTION_STRING))
            {
                conn.Open();
            }
        }
        catch (Exception e)
        {
            File.AppendAllText("GetConnectionTwo.txt", e.ToString());
        }
    }
}

I believe there is a bug here, though it's neither major, nor fundamental. After working to narrow this down (and to do things like removing one thread), it looks like the same instance of the Exception class is thrown by the Connection Pool implementation on both threads (kudos to Gregory for discovering this). This sometimes shows up as a corrupt ("intermingled") stack trace, and sometimes simply as the same stack trace on both threads, even when the code is quite different between the two threads.

Commenting out one of the Thread.Start calls shows an entirely different stack trace, demonstrating that the odd part is in the connection pool implementation - the odd stack traces are being handed out by the connection pool, since both threads use the same connection string and credentials.

I've submitted a Connect issue on this at https://connect.microsoft.com/VisualStudio/feedback/ViewFeedback.aspx?FeedbackID=522506. Everyone should feel free to vote on how important (or unimportant) you feel it is, whether you can reproduce it, or whether you have a workaround. This will help Microsoft prioritize a fix.


Update: The Connect issue has been updated. Microsoft acknowledges it as a bug, and plans to fix it in a future release.

Thanks to nganju, Gregory, and everyone else who participated in solving this problem. It was indeed a bug, and it will be fixed, and it's because of us.

share|improve this answer
    
Unusual. I get the same exception in both files, stack trace doesnt seem merged, but is only for the GetConnectionOne() call. –  Gregory Dec 30 '09 at 0:10
    
This reproduces the bug. I ran your code, and got TWO intermingled exceptions in EACH of the files created. –  nganju Dec 30 '09 at 0:10
    
They're probably not "intermingled", you probably just don't understand the single exception. Remove one of the AppendAllText lines, delete both files, and try again. I just tried it with a known-good connection string, and got no exceptions. The problem is with your connection string. –  John Saunders Dec 30 '09 at 0:16
1  
Also, try File.WriteAllText instead. –  John Saunders Dec 30 '09 at 0:18
2  
I've submitted a Connect issue on this at connect.microsoft.com/VisualStudio/feedback/…. Everyone should feel free to vote on how important you feel it is; whether you can reproduce it or whether you have a workaround. This will help Microsoft prioritize a fix. –  John Saunders Dec 30 '09 at 2:24
show 28 more comments

This is not a bug in the VM. Here is your offending line:

private static readonly DbConnectionFactory _connectionFactory;

Internal to this we have the connection pool. Which stores a reference to the exception that occurred. This opens up a race condition when performing multi-threading.

How do we prove this?

Logically if you use different connection pools then we will not have this race condition. So I reran the same test with a different data source specified in the connection string for each thread. The exceptions are now showing up correctly.

This is really a case of the connection pool not being thread safe.

share|improve this answer
    
Where is that line located? I think you're right, and that it's using a static Exception instance. –  John Saunders Dec 30 '09 at 1:18
    
If the connection pool has a pointer to an exception, then there may be a race condition where one exception gets pointed to instead of another. But it doesn't explain how a single exception has two intermingled stack traces inside it. –  nganju Dec 30 '09 at 1:18
    
It's the same exception instance, and is being operated upon by two threads at the same time, with no synchronization - that explains it completely. –  John Saunders Dec 30 '09 at 1:21
    
You're saying two threads are setting the stack trace on the same exception instance? Is there a SetStackTrace(string input) method? Even if there was, it would still be an atomic setting of the StackTrace string. The only way two threads could produce an intermingled stack trace is if they were somehow writing to a stream that was going into the StackTrace member variable in the Exception object. Doesn't seem likely. –  nganju Dec 30 '09 at 1:27
    
@nganju: did you know it's possible to look at the actual .NET code? We don't need to speculate. And pay attention to the fact that Gregory and I saw the identical Exception instance. The same object was thrown from both threads. –  John Saunders Dec 30 '09 at 1:57
show 6 more comments

OK, I managed to reproduce this (VS2008, FX3.5SP1, dual core) both inside and outside(*) the debugger. And after altering your catch logic a little it even is reliably reproducable. And, like Gregory mentioned, it is the same exception instance thrown in both threads.

This should be totally impossible at the VM level.

Where did you get that idea?

Both threads are trying to connect through the connection pool. I don't know anything about how the Pool works, but I'll take a guess: It is serializing the 2 simultaneous requests. That sounds like being nice to the Server. And then when the attempt fails it has 1 exception and 2 waiting threads.

I too would have expected the CLR or the ConnectionPool to duplicate the exception and prepend 2 separate stacktraces but instead it merges the 2 calling traces.

So I think your bug could very well be feature, status: by design.
Because it is not really an 'intermingled' stacktrace but more of a deliberately Y-shaped one. It does not look accidental.

It would be nice if somebody found a reference for this behaviour though. Right now I'm not sure if this is a CLR or a ConnectionPool 'feature'.

(*) Edit: I think I saw it outside the debugger once, but now I'm unable to reproduce that. So it could be a debugger or a timing issue.

share|improve this answer
    
I don't think this should be the approved behavior. If I'm on thread 1, why should I get information about how thread 2 got to the same exception that I got to? I've got a whole stack trace with all the method calls about a completely different thread! This seems like it should be outlawed purely from a security perspective. –  nganju Dec 30 '09 at 1:20
    
I think it's a bug or sub-optimal design of the connection pool. Somehow, it's using the same exception instance on both threads. I think there's only a single exception thrown. In the same way it would have returned the successful connection to the second thread, it's returning the failed exception to the second thread. The two stack traces are identical in my code, because they're the identical exception, as Gregory found. –  John Saunders Dec 30 '09 at 1:28
    
I promise you I'm getting an intermingled stack trace, not one stack trace or the other. I'll do a screen share with you if you want. –  nganju Dec 30 '09 at 1:36
    
nganju, we agree on the merged stacktrace. And where is the security risk? –  Henk Holterman Dec 30 '09 at 1:44
1  
Well ok. I'm just glad we're no longer blaming my pitiful understanding of threading, and how hopefully inferior it is to Microsoft's understanding. There's not a bug in the VM, but there is a bug in the framework after all. –  nganju Dec 30 '09 at 2:08
show 7 more comments

You are getting the same exception thrown. I don't understand why however. Have a look at the output window, notably that exception1 == exception2.

class ThreadingBug
{
    private const string CONNECTION_STRING =
        "Data Source=.\\wfea;Initial Catalog=catalog;Persist Security Info=True;Trusted_Connection=yes;";

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        try
        {
            Thread threadOne = new Thread(GetConnectionOne);
            Thread threadTwo = new Thread(GetConnectionTwo);
            threadOne.Start();
            threadTwo.Start();

            threadOne.Join(20000);
            threadTwo.Join(20000);

            Debug.WriteLine("Same?" + (exception1 == exception2));
        }
        catch (Exception e)
        {
            Debug.WriteLine("error main" + e);
        }
    }

    static Exception exception1;

    static void GetConnectionOne()
    {
        try
        {
            using (SqlConnection conn = new SqlConnection(CONNECTION_STRING))
            {
                conn.Open();
            }
        }
        catch (Exception e)
        {
            Debug.WriteLine("Error Con one" + e);
            exception1 = e;
        }
    }
    static Exception exception2;

    static void GetConnectionTwo()
    {
        try
        {
            using (SqlConnection conn = new SqlConnection(CONNECTION_STRING))
            {
                conn.Open();
            }
        }
        catch (Exception e)
        {
            Debug.WriteLine("Error Con two" + e);
            exception2 = e;
        }
    }
}

Edit: The below was my original response.

It's very likely your "random" filenames are similar, if not the same, as they will sometimes be called within very close timeframes. Often, when you have a problem that randomly appears, and you have a Random.Next call, it should be the first place you look.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, in the sample he posted Random.Next() will produce the same number, but he claims that the output is intermingled even if you write to two different files. –  Esteban Araya Dec 29 '09 at 23:59
    
I've tried it without the random filename generation. I just used a different filename in each respective catch block. The two files written EACH have TWO intermingled stack traces written in them. –  nganju Dec 30 '09 at 0:00
    
Yes, I'm seeing the same thing now. Trying to understand the reflected code in .Open. I note that SqlConnection instances are not thread safe, but that shouldn't be a problem here. –  Gregory Dec 30 '09 at 0:08
    
@Gregory, thanks for your help on this question. One quick favor, can you edit your response and remove the company name from the code snippet? In the db connection string, it's the word that starts with 'z' and ends with 'c'. Thanks! –  nganju Jan 4 '10 at 22:34
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