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The code in question is the code contained within the 2nd foreach loop, the purpose of which is to prevent exact duplicate latitude and longitudes.

foreach($aUsers as $k => $v)
{
    // generate address
    $aAddress = array();
    if(!empty($v['city_location']))
        $aAddress[] = $v['city_location'];
    if(!empty($v['country_child_id']))
    {
        $aRow = $oDb->select('name')
             ->from(getT('country_child'))
             ->where('child_id = \''.$v['country_child_id'].'\'')
             ->execute('getRow');
        $aAddress[] = $aRow['name'];
    }
    if(!empty($v['postal_code']))
        $aAddress[] = $v['postal_code'];
    if(!empty($v['country_iso']))
    {
        $aRow = $oDb->select('name')
             ->from(getT('country'))
             ->where('country_iso = \''.$v['country_iso'].'\'')
             ->execute('getRow');
        $aAddress[] = $aRow['name'];
    }
    $sAddress = implode(', ',$aAddress);
    /// get location
    $aLatLon = $oGeoMap->getLatLon($v['user_id'],1,$sAddress);
    if($aLatLon['success'] === true)
    {
        foreach($aUsers as $k2 => $v2)
        {
            $iAdd = .01;
            $iAttempts = 0;
            while($v2['latitude'] == $aLatLon['latitude'] && $v2['longitude'] == $aLatLon['longitude'])
            {
                $iAttempts++;
                switch($iAttempts){
                    case 1:
                        $aLatLon['latitude'] += $iAdd;
                        break;
                    case 2:
                        $aLatLon['longitude'] += $iAdd;
                        break;
                    case 3:
                        $aLatLon['latitude'] += $iAdd;
                        $aLatLon['longitude'] += $iAdd;
                        break;
                    case 4:
                        $aLatLon['latitude'] -= $iAdd;
                        $aLatLon['longitude'] -= $iAdd;
                        break;
                    case 5:
                        $aLatLon['latitude'] += $iAdd;
                        $aLatLon['longitude'] -= $iAdd;
                        break;
                    case 6:
                        $aLatLon['latitude'] -= $iAdd;
                        $aLatLon['longitude'] += $iAdd;
                        break;
                    case 7:
                        $iAdd += .01;
                        $iAttempts = 0;
                        break;
                }
            }
        }
        $aUsers[$k]['latitude'] = $aLatLon['latitude'];
        $aUsers[$k]['longitude'] = $aLatLon['longitude'];
        $aUsers[$k]['address'] = $sAddress;
    }
    else
        unset($aUsers[$k]);
}
share|improve this question
2  
Are you having problems with performance? You know the old saying: "premature optimization is the root of all evil" ... –  Jan Hančič Dec 29 '09 at 23:55
4  
We are all zen mind readers... –  gahooa Dec 29 '09 at 23:56
5  
I'd guess that the best optimization would be to allow duplicate latitudes and longitudes. Randomly fudging the data until you achieve uniqueness seems sloppy. –  Frank Farmer Dec 29 '09 at 23:59
4  
Jan, this "old saying" is a common substitute for /dev/brain. Writing code in optimal way has nothing to do with premature optimization. And this seems to be in sheer need of rewrite. But I'd first migrate it into plain English. –  Michael Krelin - hacker Dec 30 '09 at 0:01
5  
@Citizen: I think you are trying to do too much in one function. For example, the logic for choosing new points could be moved out into a separate class/function. As could the test to see if a point is unique. In fact as the code is written now it even seems that there is a bug because your uniquifying fudging could move a point to land on another point that you've already checked once, and then you would miss it because you don't seem to go back and check it again. –  Mark Byers Dec 30 '09 at 0:19

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I strongly agree with Frank Farmer's comment, but if you insist on this way of doing things try something along these lines:

$lls = array();
static $offs = array( array(1,0), array(0,1), array(1,1),
    array(-1,-1), array(1,-1), array(-1,1) );

foreach($aUsers as $k=>&$v) {
    $lla=$la=somelat; $llo=$lo=somelong;
    for($add=.01;isset($lls["{$lla}x$llo"]);$add+=.01) {
        foreach($offs as $o) {
            $lla=$la+$o[0]*$add; $llo=$lo+$o[1]*$add;
            if(!isset($lls["{$lla}x$llo"])) break;
        }
    }
    $lls["{$lla}x$llo"] = true;
    $v['latitiude']=$lla; $v['longtitude']=$llo;
    $v['address'] = $sAddress;
}

That is, if I understand your intention correctly. And change variable names to adhere to your standards yourself ;-)

Code is untested.

And no, I'm not going to re-read the full code ;-)

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. Frank's suggestion doesnt apply becuase this is for display purposes only, on a map. Duplicates simply won't show, so I have to prevent them. –  Citizen Dec 30 '09 at 0:26

You could try using a second data structure that holds existing latitude+longitude positions, e.g. a 2-D array of users indexed by latitude then longitude. Rather than looping over the $aUsers array, you check whether a given latitude and longitude exists within this other data structure.

Note that as you can only use integers and strings as array keys and casting floating point numbers to either integers or strings will result in a loss of precision, you should convert floating point numbers to their bit-string equivalents if you're using latitude and longitude as keys. A simple pack('d', $l) should work, or you could use:

function fl2hex($l, $fmt='d') {
    $hex = unpack('H*', pack($fmt, $l));
    return $hex[1];
}

If you know your latitude and longitude are stored as floats and not doubles (though I'm fairly certain PHP only uses doubles), you can use 'f' as the pack format rather than 'd'.

For readability, you can refactor parts of the code (e.g. the switch($iAttempts)) as additional functions.

As for the problem of multiple people at a single location, another solution (assuming the map is displayed on a screen, rather than printed) is to use a different indicator for a group of people. When a user mouses over the group icon, it can "explode" into a star of individual icons (if that makes sense), each with a line connecting the icon to the people's location. I've seen something similar in a couple applications, but can't think which ones right now.

share|improve this answer
    
You don't really need a 2D array here. –  Michael Krelin - hacker Dec 30 '09 at 0:27
    
@Michael: hence the "e.g." –  outis Dec 30 '09 at 0:31
    
outis, ah, makes sense ;-) –  Michael Krelin - hacker Dec 30 '09 at 0:35
    
outis, what loss of precision?! Over 0.01 when computing lattitude and longtitude? And what precision does he need to avoid collisions? –  Michael Krelin - hacker Dec 30 '09 at 8:35
    
@Michael: when Citizen is testing whether someone exists at a given location, he isn't doing it within a tolerance, though perhaps he should. My recommendation is intended to match the behavior of his existing code. –  outis Dec 30 '09 at 11:28

You could use switch() with a semicolon... E.g.

switch($attempts) {
    case 1;
    case 3;
    case 5;
        $aLatLon['latitude'] += $iAdd;
    break;
}

Haven't tested this; but I'm sure if you keep going like this or something similar, it will work.

Hopefully that helped

share|improve this answer
    
How is semicolon different from colon? Except for it looks hideous? –  Michael Krelin - hacker Dec 30 '09 at 17:48

Suggestion:

This is more of a general suggestion for all the code, not just the inner loop. I would change the code to use dedicated structures instead of arrays. Here's a basic example:

foreach($aUsers as $k => $v)
{
    $userInfo = new UserInfo($v);

    // generate address
    $sAddress = $userInfo->getAddress();

    /// get location
    $latLonResult = $oGeoMap->getLatLon($userInfo->user_id, 1, $sAddress);
    ...
}

Actual answer:

As far as optimizing the inner loop, I would just delete that code. Either come up with a new UI element for having multiple users in the same location, or ignore a user if their lat/long has already been added to the map.

If you must keep it, Michael's solution looked good.

share|improve this answer
    
Actually, except for minor syntactical differences your suggestion and my solution aren't mutually exclusive. I'm not sure whether your proposal is an improvement. But it won't do any harm either. –  Michael Krelin - hacker Dec 30 '09 at 17:46
    
Yes, I thought that was implied. –  Kevin Dec 30 '09 at 18:14

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