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I'm writing some JavaScript to parse user-entered functions (for spreadsheet-like functionality). Having parsed the formula I could convert it into JavaScript and run eval() on it to yield the result. However, I've always shied away from using eval() if I can avoid it because it's evil (and, rightly or wrongly, I've always thought it is even more evil in JavaScript because the code to be evaluated might be changed by the user).

Obviously one has to use eval() to parse JSON (I presume that JS libraries use eval() for this somewhere, even if they run the JSON through a regex check first), but when else, other than when manipulating JSON, it is OK to use eval()?

As several people have now pointed-out, it's not even necessary to use eval() to parse JSON. So, when is it OK to use it?

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3  
Most JSON libraries do not, in fact use eval under the hood, exactly to protect against the security risks. –  Sean McMillan Dec 14 '09 at 17:23
7  
@Sean - Both JQuery and Prototype use eval (JQuery uses it via new Function) –  plodder Apr 19 '10 at 22:53
3  
@plodder - Where are you getting your info? jQuery has utilized the native JSON.parse() since 1.4 (way back in 1/2010)! See for yourself: code.jquery.com/jquery-1.4.js –  ken Jan 4 '11 at 18:38
2  
"Obviously one has to use eval() to parse JSON" -- this is not true, on the contrary - one shouldn't use eval to parse JSON! Use Douglas Crockfords' (creator of JSON) json2.js script from json.org! –  TMS Apr 25 '12 at 23:47
4  
@Tomas the irony there being that json2.js uses eval to parse JSON –  tobyodavies Jun 8 '12 at 2:01

23 Answers 23

up vote 152 down vote accepted

I'd like to take a moment to address the premise of your question - that eval() is "evil". The word "evil", as used by programming language people, usually means "dangerous", or more precisely "able to cause lots of harm with a simple-looking command". So, when is it OK to use something dangerous? When you know what the danger is, and when you're taking the appropriate precautions.

To the point, let's look at the dangers in the use of eval(). There are probably many small hidden dangers just like everything else, but the two big risks - the reason why eval() is considered evil - are performance and code injection.

  • Performance - eval() runs the interpreter/compiler. If your code is compiled, then this is a big hit, because you need to call a possibly-heavy compiler in the middle of run-time. However, JavaScript is still mostly an interpreted language, which means that calling eval() is not a big performance hit in the general case (but see my specific remarks below).
  • Code injection - eval() potentially runs a string of code under elevated privileges. For example, a program running as administrator/root would never want to eval() user input, because that input could potentially be "rm -rf /etc/important-file" or worse. Again, JavaScript in a browser doesn't have that problem, because the program is running in the user's own account anyway. Server-side JavaScript could have that problem.

On to your specific case. From what I understand, you're generating the strings yourself, so assuming you're careful not to allow a string like "rm -rf something-important" to be generated, there's no code injection risk (but please remember, it's very very hard to ensure this in the general case). Also, if you're running in the browser then code injection is a pretty minor risk, I believe.

As for performance, you'll have to weight that against ease of coding. It is my opinion that if you're parsing the formula, you might as well compute the result during the parse rather than run another parser (the one inside eval()). But it may be easier to code using eval(), and the performance hit will probably be unnoticeable. It looks like eval() in this case is no more evil than any other function that could possibly save you some time.

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43  
You're not addressing the issue of code that uses eval being difficult to debug –  bobobobo Aug 29 '09 at 18:45
22  
Code Injection is a very serious issue for javascript if you are at all concerned about your user's data. Injected code will run (in the browser) as if it came from your site, letting it do any sort of shenanigan that the user could do manually. If you allow (third-party) code to enter you page, it can order things on behalf of your customer, or change their gravatar, or whatever they could do through your site. Be very careful. Letting hackers own your customers is just as bad as letting them own your server. –  Sean McMillan Dec 14 '09 at 17:19
39  
If the data is comming from your server and its something that you, the developer has generated, there is no harm in using eval(). The real harm is beliving everything you read. You see lots of people saying eval() is evil and they have no idea why except that they read it somewhere. –  Vince Panuccio Mar 4 '10 at 5:38
27  
@Sean McMillan: I want to believe you, but if someone is going to intercept and change javascript going to eval() from your server, they could also just change the page's source in the first place, and also take control of the user's information . . . I don't see the difference. –  Walt W Apr 1 '10 at 17:25
6  
Re "Code injection - ... Again, JavaScript in a browser doesn't have that problem," & " Also, if you're running in the browser then code injection is a pretty minor risk, I believe." Are you suggesting that code-injection in the browser is not a problem? XSS has been in the top 3 vulns on OWASP's top 10 list for several years running. –  Mike Samuel Aug 3 '12 at 22:42

eval() isn't evil. Or, if it is, it's evil in the same way that reflection, file/network IO, threading, and IPC are "evil" in other languages.

If, for your purpose, eval() is faster than manual interpretation, or makes your code simpler, or more clear... then you should use it. If neither, then you shouldn't. Simple as that.

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13  
Good to see some people actually using their brain. –  finishingmove Apr 20 '13 at 13:16
1  
One such purpose might be to generate optimized code that would either be too long or too repetitive to write by hand. The kind of stuff that, in LISP, would call for a macro. –  wberry Mar 25 at 15:39

When you trust the source.

In case of JSON, it is more or less hard to tamper with the source, because it comes from a web server you control. As long as the JSON itself contains no data a user has uploaded, there is no major drawback to use eval.

In all other cases I would go great lengths to ensure user supplied data conforms to my rules before feeding it to eval().

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7  
A json string should always be tested against the json grammar before using it in eval(). So the json string "{foo:alert('XSS')}" would not pass since “alert('XSS')” is not a proper value. –  Gumbo Feb 11 '09 at 12:52
    
Or when the environment is secure. –  Eli Grey Oct 21 '09 at 0:30
    
But can you ever really trust the source when you're using a protocol that is susceptible to man-in-the-middle attacks? –  Justin Johnson Dec 15 '09 at 18:13
    
Well, use HTTPS, then. OTOH: man-in-the-middle is not the typical attack scenario for the garden variety web app, whereas i.e. cross-site-scripting is. –  Tomalak Dec 15 '09 at 18:50
4  
eval will also not correctly parse all valid JSON strings. For example JSON.parse(' "\u2028" ') === "\u2028" but eval(' "\u2028" ') raises an exception because U+2028 is a newline in JavaScript but it is not a newline as far as JSON is concerned. –  Mike Samuel Aug 3 '12 at 22:36

Lets get real folks:

  1. Every major browser now has a built in console which your would-be hacker can use with abandon to invoke any function with any value - why would they bother to use an eval statement - even if they could?

  2. If it takes 0.2s to compile 2000 lines of javascript what is my performance degradation if I eval 4 lines of JSON?

Even Crockford's explanation for 'eval is evil' is weak.

"eval is Evil
The eval function is the most misused feature of JavaScript. Avoid it"

As Crockford himself might say "This kind of statement tends to generate irrational neurosis. Don't buy it"

Understanding eval and knowing when it might be useful is way more important. For example eval is a sensible tool for evaluating server responses that were generated by your software.

BTW: Prototype.js calls eval directly 5 times (including in evalJSON() and evalResponse()). JQuery uses it in parseJSON (via Function constructor)

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5  
JQuery uses the browser's builtin JSON.parse function if available (which is much faster & safer), using eval only as a fallback mechanism. The statement "eval is evil" is a reasonably good guideline. –  jjmontes Sep 12 '11 at 13:21
5  
Re "Every major browser now has a built in console...". Code injection is a problem when one user can enter code that is then run in another user's browser. Browser consoles do not by themselves allow one user to run code in another users browser so they are irrelevant when deciding whether it is worth protecting against code injection. –  Mike Samuel Aug 3 '12 at 22:29
5  
"Every major browser now has a built in console ... why would they bother to use an eval statement?" - You are way off the mark. I suggest you edit the answer. Ability of one user to inject code that can run in another's browser is a major issue. And this is where you need to get really real. –  akkishore Dec 27 '12 at 8:24
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Who is Crockford anyway? You are right, attacker can use any HTTP leach tool to mimic browser and do anything, he doesnt need EVAL. –  Akash Kava Apr 19 '13 at 10:29
3  
@akkishore, I will appreciate if you come up with a real life example that supports your over stated statements. –  Akash Kava Apr 19 '13 at 10:31

I tend to follow Crockford's advice for eval(), and avoid it altogether. Even ways that appear to require it do not. For example, the setTimeout() allows you to pass a function rather than eval.

setTimeout(function() {
  alert('hi');
}, 1000);

Even if it's a trusted source, I don't use it, because the code returned by JSON might be garbled, which could at best do something wonky, at worst, expose something bad.

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1  
How would a successful call to a web server yield a garbled result (bugs in the JSON-generating web server code notwithstanding)? –  Tomalak Oct 13 '08 at 14:46
1  
I think that bugs in the JSON formatter on the server side are certainly an issue. Does the response from the server depend on any kind of user submitted text? Then you gotta watch for XSS. –  swilliams Oct 13 '08 at 15:06
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If your webserver isn't authenticated via HTTPS, then you could suffer some sort of man-in-the-middle attack where another host intercepts the request and sends its own data. –  Ben Combee Dec 21 '08 at 0:18
6  
If someone can perform man-in-the-middle attack, he can easily inject anything to your scripts. –  el.pescado May 5 '10 at 17:11
6  
You should not rely on your javascript code at all... You not rely on anything that runs on the client side... If someone does man-in-the-middle attack why would he mess with your json objects? He can serve a different webpage to you and different js files... –  Calmarius Jul 1 '10 at 13:24

I just want to add my 0.50$ here, I saw people advocate to not use eval, because is evil but saw the same people use dinamically Function and setTimeout, so they use eval under the hoods :D btw, if your sandbox is not sure enought (eg. if you're working on a site that allow code injection) eval is the last of your problems, the basic rule of security is that all input is evil, but in case of javascript even javascript itself could be evil, because in javascript you can overwrite any function and you just can't be sure you're using the real one, so, if a malicious code start before you, you can't trust any javascript built-in function :D

Now the epilogue to this post is: if you REALLY need it (80% of the time eval is NOT needed) and you're sure of what you' re doing, just use eval (or better Function ;) ), closures and OOP cover the 80/90% of the case where eval can be replaced using another kind of logic, the rest is dinamically generated code (for example if you' re writing an interpreter) and as you already said evaluating json (here you can use the crockford safe evaluation ;) )

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Microsoft explains why eval() is slow in their browser on IE Blog

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As far as client script goes, I think the issue of security is a moot point. Everything loaded into the browser is subject to manipulation and should be treated as such. There is zero risk in using an eval() statement when there are much easier ways to execute javascript and/or manipulate objects in the DOM, such as the URL bar in your browser.

javascript:alert("hello");

If someone wants to manipulate their DOM, I say swing away. Security to prevent any type of attack should always be the responsibility of the server application, period.

From a pragmatic standpoint, there's no benefit to using an eval() in a situation where things can be done otherwise. However, there are specific cases where an eval SHOULD be used. When so, it can definitely be done without any risk of blowing up the page.

<html>
<body>

<textarea id="output"></textarea><br/>
<input type="text" id="input" />
<button id="button" onclick="execute()">eval</button>

<script type="text/javascript">
var execute = function(){
    var inputEl = document.getElementById('input');
    var toEval = inputEl.value;
    var outputEl = document.getElementById('output');
    var output = "";

    try {
    	output = eval(toEval);
    }
    catch(err){
    	for(var key in err){
    		output += key + ": " + err[key] + "\r\n";
    	}
    }
    outputEl.value = output;
}
</script>

<body>
</html>
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4  
Re "There is zero risk in using an eval() statement when there are much easier ways to execute javascript and/or manipulate objects in the DOM". Code injection is a problem when one user can enter code that is then run in another user's browser. Browser consoles do not by themselves allow one user to run code in another users browser so they are irrelevant when deciding whether it is worth protecting against code injection. –  Mike Samuel Aug 3 '12 at 22:30

The only instance when you should be using eval() is when you need to run dynamic JS on the fly. I'm talking about JS that you download asynchronously from the server...

...And 9 times of 10 you could easily avoid doing that by refactoring.

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It's okay to use it if you have complete control over the code that's passed to the eval function.

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1  
If you have complete control over what you're passing to eval, then the big question becomes, when does it make sense for that to be a string rather than real JS? –  cHao Jan 15 at 13:59

My believe is that eval is a very powerfull function for client side web application and safe... As safe as javascript, which are not. :-) The secutity issues are essentially a server side problem because, now, with tool like firebug, you can attack any javasript application.

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When is JavaScript's eval() not evil?

I'm always trying to discourage from eval. Almost always, more clean and maintainable solution is available. Eval is not needed even for JSON parsing. Eval adds to maintenance hell. Not without reason is frowned upon masters like Douglas Crockford.

But I found one example where it should be used:

When you need to pass the expression.

For example, I have a function that constructs a general google.maps.ImageMapType object for me, but I need to tell it the recipe, how should it construct the tile URL from the zoom and coord parameters:

my_func({
    name: "OSM",
    tileURLexpr: '"http://tile.openstreetmap.org/"+b+"/"+a.x+"/"+a.y+".png"',
    ...
});

function my_func(opts) 
{
    return new google.maps.ImageMapType({
        getTileUrl: function (coord, zoom) {
            var b = zoom;
            var a = coord;
            return eval(opts.tileURLexpr);
        },
        ....
    });
}
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This looks like it could be refactored so that eval() isn't necessary - tileURLexpr is just a template so some judicious use of replace() would do the job. Still, it does remind me of an example I had in mind when I submitted the question, which was to do with allowing a user to specify a mathematical formula to be evaluated, similar to spreadsheet functionality. Of course I didn't mention that at the time because I didn't want to influence the answers! –  Richard Turner May 11 '12 at 13:10
2  
tileURL: function (zoom, coord) { return 'http://tile.openstreetmap.org/' + b + '/' + a.x + '/' + a.y + '.png'; }, –  Casey Chu Oct 30 '13 at 9:32

eval is rarely the right choice. While there may be numerous instances where you can accomplish what you need to accomplish by concatenating a script together and running it on the fly, you typically have much more powerful and maintainable techniques at your disposal: associative-array notation (obj["prop"] is the same as obj.prop), closures, object-oriented techniques, functional techniques - use them instead.

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Eval is complementary to Compilation which is used in Templating the code, by templating I mean, that you write a simplified template generator that generates useful template code which increases development speed.

I have written a framework, where developers dont use EVAL, but they use our framework and in turn that framework has to use EVAL to generate templates.

Performance of EVAL can be increased by using following method, instead executing the script, you must return a function.

var a = eval("3 + 5");

Should be organized as

var f = eval("(function(a,b) { return a + b; })");

var a = f(3,5);

Caching f will certainly improve the speed.

Also Chrome allows debugging of such functions very easily.

Regarding Security, using eval or not will hardly make any difference,

  1. First of all, browser invokes entire script in sandbox.
  2. Any code that is evil in EVAL, it is evil in browser itself, attacker or anyone can easily inject a script node in DOM and do anything if he can eval anything. Not using EVAL will not make any difference.
  3. It is mostly a poor Server Side Security that is harmful, poor cookies validation or poor ACL implementation on server causes most attacks.
  4. Recent Java vulnerability etc was there in Java's native code, JavaScript was and is designed to run in sandbox, where else applets were designed to run outside sandbox with certificate etc that lead to vulnerability and many other things.
  5. Writing a code for imitating browser is not difficult, all you have to do is make HTTP request to server with a your fav user agent string. All testing tools mock browsers anyway, if an attacker want to harm you, EVAL is their last resort, they have many other ways to deal with your server side security.
  6. Browser DOM does not have access to files, not user name, infact nothing on the machine that eval can give access to.

If your Server Side Security is Solid enough for anyone to attack from anywhere, you should not worry about EVAL, as I mentioned, if EVAL would not exist, attackers have many tools to hack into your server irrespective of your browser's EVAL capability.

Eval is only good for generating some templates to do complex string processing based on something that is not used in advanced. For example,I will prefer

"FirstName + ' ' + LastName"

As opposed to

"LastName + ' ' + FirstName"

As my display name, which can come from database and which is not hardcoded.

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You can use function instead of eval - function (first, last) { return last + ' ' + first }. –  xfix Oct 15 '13 at 19:10
    
Names of columns come from database. –  Akash Kava Oct 15 '13 at 19:49
1  
The threat of eval is mostly other users. Let's say you have a settings page, and it lets you set how your name appears to others. Let's also say you weren't thinking very clearly when you wrote it, so your select box has options like <option value="LastName + ' ' + FirstName">Last First</option>. I open my dev tools, change the value of an option to alert('PWNED!'), select the changed option, and submit the form. Now, any time some other person can see my display name, that code runs. –  cHao Jan 15 at 15:05

My example of using eval: import.

How it's usually done.

var components = require('components');
var Button = components.Button;
var ComboBox = components.ComboBox;
var CheckBox = components.CheckBox;
...
// that quickly gets very boring

But with the help of eval and little helper function it gets much better look.

var components = require('components');
eval(importable('components', 'Button', 'ComboBox', 'CheckBox', ...));

importable might look like (this version doesn't support importing concrete members).

function importable(path) {
    var name;
    var pkg = eval(path);
    var result = '\n';
    for (name in pkg) {
        result += 'if (name !== undefined) throw "import error: name already exists";\n'.replace(/name/g, name);
    }
    for (name in pkg) {
        result += 'var name = path.name;\n'.replace(/name/g, name).replace('path', path);
    }
    return result;
}
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+1 for the idea, but you have a bug here: .replace(/name/g, name).replace('path', path). If name contains the string "path" then you could get surprises. –  wberry Mar 25 at 15:36

When debugging in Chrome (v28.0.1500.72), I found that variables are not bound to closures if they are not used in a nested function that produces the closure. I guess, that's an optimization of the JavaScript engine.

BUT: when eval() is used inside a function that causes a closure, ALL the variables of outer functions are bound to the closure, even if they are not used at all. If someone has the time to test if memory leaks can be produced by that, please leave me a comment below.

Here's my test code:

(function () {
    var eval = function (arg) {
    };

    function evalTest() {
        var used = "used";
        var unused = "not used";

        (function () {
            used.toString();   // variable "unused" is visible in debugger
            eval("1");
        })();
    }

    evalTest();
})();

(function () {
    var eval = function (arg) {
    };

    function evalTest() {
        var used = "used";
        var unused = "not used";

        (function () {
            used.toString();   // variable "unused" is NOT visible in debugger
            var noval = eval;
            noval("1");
        })();
    }

    evalTest();
})();

(function () {
    var noval = function (arg) {
    };

    function evalTest() {
        var used = "used";
        var unused = "not used";

        (function () {
            used.toString();    // variable "unused" is NOT visible in debugger
            noval("1");
        })();
    }

    evalTest();
})();

What I like to point out here is, that eval() must not necessarily refer to native eval() function, it all depends on the name of the function. So when calling native eval() with an alias name (say var noval = eval; and then in an inner function noval(expression);) then the evaluation of expression may fail when it refers to variables that should be part of the closure but is actually not.

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Eval is useful for code generation when you don't have macros.

For (a stupid) example, if you're writing a brainfuck compiler, you'll probably want to construct a function that performs the sequence of instructions as a string, and eval it to return a function.

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Only during testing, if possible. Also note that eval() is much slower than other specialized JSON etc. evaluators.

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There is no reason not to use eval() as long as you can be sure that the source of the code comes from you or the actual user. Even though he can manipulate what gets sent into the eval() function, thats not a security problem because he is able to manipulate the source code of the web site and could therefore change the javascript code itself.

So... when not use eval()? Eval() should only not be used when there is a chance that a third party could change it. Like intercepting the connection between the client and your server (but if that is a problem use HTTPS). You shouldn't eval() for parsing code that is written by others like in a forum.

share|improve this answer
    
Re "There is no reason not to use eval() as long as you can be sure that the source of the code comes from you or the actual user." This assumes that there is a single user. That premise is not stated in the OP. When there are multiple users, careless eval of a string composed from content from one user can allow that user to execute code in the other user's browser. –  Mike Samuel Aug 3 '12 at 22:33
    
@MikeSamuel, eval can execute code in other user's browser, I havent heard this, have you tried this? This never happened in history of browsing, can you show us an example? –  Akash Kava Apr 19 '13 at 10:20
    
@AkashKava, A string can originate with one user-agent, be stored in a database, and then served to another browser which evals it. It happens all the time. –  Mike Samuel Apr 19 '13 at 15:10
    
@MikeSamuel database? where? who serves wrong string? isnt it database on server side to blame? first of all EVAL is not to be blamed for poorly written server side code. Use jsfiddle and show the world a real world example where it can cause harm. –  Akash Kava Apr 19 '13 at 16:10
1  
@AkashKava, I don't understand your question. We aren't talking about a specific application, but reasons not to use eval. How is it useful to blame the server? If anyone should be blamed, it should be the attacker. Regardless of blame, a client that is not vulnerable to XSS despite bugs in the server is better than a client that is vulnerable, all else being equal. –  Mike Samuel Apr 19 '13 at 16:18

If i's really needed eval is not evil. But 99.9% of the uses of eval that I stumble across are not needed (not including setTimeout stuff).

For me the evil is not a performance or even a security issue (well, indirectly it's both). All such unnecessary uses of eval add to a maintenance hell. Refactoring tools are thrown off. Searching for code is hard. Unanticipated effects of those evals are legion.

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4  
eval isn't necessary for setTimeout. You can use a function reference there too. –  Matthew Crumley Dec 20 '08 at 19:50

Another perspective:-

Use case for eval()

Performance and injection aside use eval when you cannot avoid but receive Javascript code as string.

Use Javascript code as a string as a last resort because most tools like JSHint, JSLint and IDEs cannot help you when the code is a string literals.

So if you can achieve the same functionality without eval() you have more benefits on your side.

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When performance is NOT that important which in most cases it should be.

Quote from MSDN

http://blogs.msdn.com/b/ie/archive/2006/11/16/ie-javascript-performance-recommendations-part-2-javascript-code-inefficiencies.aspx

Running Code Using the ‘eval’ Statement is Expensive

The title explains it all. The eval statement in JScript is both expensive in terms of performance and prone to error if the site is generating dynamically the script to be run. If you can remove it from your application you should do so. You’ll need to replace it with functional equivalents where the dynamically evaluated code can be simulated by changing the input parameters. This general wisdom not only leads to faster code in most cases but can also make your program more reliable and easy to understand. If arbitrary code is executing on the client machine it becomes hard to determine how it failed.

For those interested in the “why”, execution of an arbitrary string of script involves the construction of a new script runtime, copying the context of the currently executing script, manipulation of the runtime stack, and a bit of other work. This isn’t much different from running other code, but isn’t nearly as fast as writing the inline branching code to handle all of the possibilities of the dynamically generated code. There are obviously good uses for the eval statement, just examine your project thoroughly before taking a dependency on it.

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When you parse JSON structure with a parse function (for example jQuery.parseJSON), it expects perfect structure of the JSON file (each property name is in double quotes). However, JavaScript is more flexible. Therefore, you can use eval() to avoid it.

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4  
Don't blindly use eval, esp. when getting JSON data from a third-party source. See JSON.Stringify without quotes on properties? for the correct approach to parse "JSON without quoted key names". –  Rob W Jul 20 '12 at 20:58
1  
If it doesn't use double quotes around property names, it might be a string representation of an object literal, but it is not JSON. JSON defines the property names as a string and defines a string as a sequence of zero or more Unicode characters, wrapped in double quotes, using backslash escapes. –  Useless Code Mar 19 '13 at 13:34
    
See article by Nikolas Zakas - "eval() isn’t evil, just misunderstood" nczonline.net/blog/2013/06/25/eval-isnt-evil-just-misunderstood –  vitmalina Jul 12 '13 at 5:16

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