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I have a class BasicFooBuilder that has a buildFoo method takes in a Foo and builds something. But then I want to create an entire hierarchy of builders and more complex objects that I want to work with. Currently I have something like this:

public interface Builder{
 public void buildFoo(BasicFoo foo);
}

public class BasicFooBuilder implements Builder{
 @override
 public void buildFoo(BasicFoo foo){
  //Do something
 }
}

public class FancyFooBuilder extends BasicFooBuilder{
 @override
 public void buildFoo(BasicFoo foo){
  ((FancyFoo)foo).doSomethingFancy();
 }
 //More stuff inherited from basic foo
}

public class FancierFooBuilder extends FancyFooBuilder{
 @override
 public void buildFoo(BasicFoo foo){
  ((FancierFoo)foo).doSomethingFancier();
 }
 //More stuff inherited from basic foo and fancy foo
}

The class hierarchy is something like this:

BasicFoo
  |
  FancyFoo
    |
    FancierFoo

So the question is this:

How can I do the above without doing all that casting in the sub classes' overriden methods?

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You will need a generic type parameter that basically represents the class you're building itself. You can't quite restrict it to only one class only, but you can get close.

public interface Builder<T extends BasicFoo> {
 public void buildFoo(T foo);
}

public class BasicFooBuilder<T extends BasicFoo> implements Builder<T> {
 @Override
 public void buildFoo(BasicFoo foo){
  //Do something
 }
}

public class FancyFooBuilder<T extends FancyFoo> extends BasicFooBuilder<T> {
 @Override
 public void buildFoo(T foo){
  foo.doSomethingFancy();
 }
 //More stuff inherited from basic foo
}

public class FancierFooBuilder<T extends FancierFoo> extends FancyFooBuilder<T> {
 @Override
 public void buildFoo(T foo){
  foo.doSomethingFancier();
 }
 //More stuff inherited from basic foo and fancy foo
}
share|improve this answer
    
Perfect. This is exactly what I was looking for. Is there a name for this pattern besides 'Good Approach to programming'? :) –  MickJ Nov 4 '13 at 22:07
    
I don't know if there is a name for this "pattern". It's just using generics to define the relationships between classes. –  rgettman Nov 4 '13 at 22:12
    
Thanks. Accepted. –  MickJ Nov 4 '13 at 22:18

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