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Ok, so this is probably a beginner question, but I didn't write SQL (for SQL Server 2008) for a long time and I forgot a lot of things.

The situation : I'm writing an AFTER INSERT trigger on a table, so I can access to INSERTED pseudo-table, if I have good memory. The trigger is a bit long, so I can't copy / pasta it here, but basically, I'd like to compare the datas of the row I'm inserting (representing a good) with the rows of another table (very similar, representing the wishes), in order to determine if the good inserted corresponds to someone's wishes (if I'm not clear, please don't downvote and require explanations...)

So, I almost finished my trigger, but an error occurred. At a given point, I wrote :

-- Create and open a cursor
IF (@variable1 = INSERTED.MyField)
BEGIN
    -- some code
END

-- Deallocate and close my cursor

But I have the following error :

The multi-part identifier "INSERTED.MyField" could not be bound

I thought I could do it, as there is only one line in INSERTED as this moment (I'm right, don't I ?), but it seems I can't.

Can someone explain me why I'm wrong ?

PS : Yes, I've seen this link, or this one, or this one, but they all have a problem with JOIN, and I don't have any JOIN in here

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2  
Ok first inserted can have more than one value in it, so how can you compare the value to a scalar variable. And you should not ever use a cursor ina trigger as they have to be performant or you will have blocking. –  HLGEM Nov 4 '13 at 22:02
    
INSERTED can have more than one line, but I'm not inserting data in bulk, so I hop there can be only one line... False ? And if it's a bad practice to have a cursor, can you suggest me another way to compare the data of the inserted line with datas of another table ? A simple request doesn't seem to be an appropriate solution –  AlexB Nov 4 '13 at 22:09
    
Use joins. You can never guarantee that only one record at a time is inserted. It is dangerous and irresponsible to assumet hat. –  HLGEM Nov 4 '13 at 22:29
    
So, I have to join the INSERTED table and the table where I'm inserting data, right ? –  AlexB Nov 4 '13 at 22:35

1 Answer 1

That error indicates SQL is trying to read 'INSERTED' as an alias for another table

IF (@variable1 = INSERTED.MyField)

Try the following to reference the inserted table

IF (@variable1 = MyField from inserted)

Using the inserted and deleted Tables: http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms191300%28v=sql.105%29.aspx

This fixes the syntax and answers the question of why the error is occurring, but comparing inserted to a scalar variable is not recommended. As HLGEM stated, what if you have multiple values in the insert where some match and some don't.

Additionally, Cursors should be a last resort in SQL. In general, cursors are slower and hold up resources. SQL is a optimized for set-based operations and cursors don't leverage that. Without knowing exactly what you are trying to do in the cursor and how much data you are manipulating, I can't say definitely in this case.

One of the many discussions on StackOverflow about Cursors: stackoverflow.com/questions/743183/what-is-wrong-with-cursors

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NEVER suggest comparing the field from insertted to a scalar vaiable. What if you have two records and one matches and one doesn't? –  HLGEM Nov 4 '13 at 22:30
    
Yeah, it is not a good idea generally. The same can be said for cursors most of the time too, which is the first part of that code example. If the inserts are truly need to be one at a time that a cursor would suggest, it might work ok, but likely it won't be efficient. –  John Turner Nov 4 '13 at 23:06
    
@AlexB without knowing exactly what you are trying to do in the cursor and how much data you are manipulating, I can't say definitely in this case. In general, cursors are slower and hold up resources. SQL is a optimized for set-based operations and cursors don't leverage that. One of the many discussions on StackOverflow about Cursors: stackoverflow.com/questions/743183/what-is-wrong-with-cursors –  John Turner Nov 4 '13 at 23:19

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