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I'm using JavaScript with the jQuery library to manipulate image thumbnails contained in a unordered list. When the image is loaded it does one thing, when an error occurs it does something else. I'm using jQuery load() and error() methods as events. After these events I check the image DOM element for the .complete to make sure the image wasn't already loaded before jQuery could register the events.

It works correctly except when an error occurs before jQuery can register the events. The only solution I can think of is to use the img onerror attribute to store a "flag" somewhere globally (or on the node it's self) that says it failed so jQuery can check that "store/node" when checking .complete.

Anyone have a better solution?

Edit: Bolded main points and added extra detail below: I'm checking if an image is complete (aka loaded) AFTER I add a load and error event on the image. That way, if the image was loaded before the events were registered, I will still know. If the image isn't loaded after the events then the events will take care of it when it does. The problem with this is, I can easily check if an image is loaded already, but I can't tell if an error occurred instead.

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When do you register the jQuery events? Maybe some codes will help. :) –  o.k.w Dec 30 '09 at 1:02
    
Theres a lot of code, what I said above is just a very simple version of what I'm doing. I call the events after the DOM is loaded a method is called to add events to the thumbnails. –  William Dec 30 '09 at 1:06
    
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7 Answers

up vote 105 down vote accepted

Another option is to trigger the onload and/or onerror events by creating an in memory image element and setting its src attribute to the original src attribute of the original image. Here's an example of what I mean:

$("<img/>")
    .load(function() { console.log("image loaded correctly"); })
    .error(function() { console.log("error loading image"); })
    .attr("src", $(originalImage).attr("src"))
;

Hope this helps!

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10  
Doesn't seem to be working as well as I hoped. In Google Chrome it seems to be having issues when the image is already in cache. It doesn't trigger the load() method. :( –  William Dec 30 '09 at 3:05
1  
Ugg, you're right. Chrome is definitely the most annoying browser to develop for. On the bright, I think I may have found a work around: set the image source to "" then back to the original source. I'll update my answer. –  Xavi Dec 30 '09 at 3:25
2  
@Gromix but then your stuff will take longer to load... –  Muhd Mar 14 '12 at 22:10
1  
it works like a charm.. thanks.. –  pratikabu Nov 26 '12 at 7:19
1  
@Xavi Chrome is not the most annoying browser to develop for, try developing for Internet Explorer 7 or less. Besides adding a $_GET parameter to the image load, will load a new image everytime, like Gromix suggested. –  SSH This Jan 14 '13 at 23:51
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Check the complete and naturalWidth properties, in that order.

http://www.sajithmr.me/javascript-check-an-image-is-loaded-or-not/

function IsImageOk(img) {
    // During the onload event, IE correctly identifies any images that
    // weren’t downloaded as not complete. Others should too. Gecko-based
    // browsers act like NS4 in that they report this incorrectly.
    if (!img.complete) {
        return false;
    }

    // However, they do have two very useful properties: naturalWidth and
    // naturalHeight. These give the true size of the image. If it failed
    // to load, either of these should be zero.

    if (typeof img.naturalWidth !== "undefined" && img.naturalWidth === 0) {
        return false;
    }

    // No other way of checking: assume it’s ok.
    return true;
}
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Interesting, I was looking at that post earlier and I didn't realize that they were doing ! complete for IE as naturalWidth is not defined in IE. Going to check it now. –  William Dec 30 '09 at 1:07
    
I think I should have explained better in my main question. I'm calling this after I add the events for load,error so that if it already had an error I will know. This method returns false even if a method is still "loading" and it has 0 errors. I need something to check if it has had an error, if it's still loading / complete then it should return true. Thanks for the answer though –  William Dec 30 '09 at 1:30
    
You should edit your question. –  SLaks Dec 30 '09 at 1:42
13  
You can just check img.naturalWidth === 0, no need to test that the type is not undefined. –  nornagon May 31 '11 at 8:38
1  
Apparently, this only works reliably the first time. If you then change the src of the image, at least safari mobile will keep reporting the first value for both naturalWidth and complete. –  giorgian Apr 23 '13 at 9:20
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Use imagesLoaded. I've tested that it works in IE7+, and everything else you'd expect.

Usable with plain JS and as a jQuery plugin.

And... Paul Irish loves it!

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This worked perfectly for me. function checkImages(imgs) { $(imgs).each(function() { $(imgs).imagesLoaded() .progress(function(instance, image) { if(image.isLoaded == false) { console.log(image.img.src + ' could not be found.'); image.img.src = "/templates/img/no-image.jpg"; } }); }); } –  Rooster242 Mar 11 at 18:23
    
it seems to have TON of open issues which major bugs, and the developer's doesn't seem to do much catching up with them. as of now, this is totally unusable in a production environment. –  vsync Mar 29 at 22:07
    
@vsync Have you read some of the open issues? He responds to nearly all of them, and most seem to be unreproducible edge-cases which few others encounter. I've never had a problem with it in production. –  Zougen Moriver Apr 23 at 11:43
    
yes I use it myself and sometimes it doesn't work, so I use a setTimeout to cover cases where it fails –  vsync Apr 23 at 15:01
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I tried many different ways and this way is the only one worked for me

//check all images on the page
$('img').each(function(){
    var img = new Image();
    img.onload = function() {
        console.log($(this).attr('src') + ' - done!');
    }
    img.src = $(this).attr('src');
});

You could also add a callback function triggered once all images are loaded in the DOM and ready. This applies for dynamically added images too. http://jsfiddle.net/khaled450/nrAPk/

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As I understand the .complete property is non-standard. It may not be universal... I notice it seem to work differently in Firefox verses IE. I am loading a number of images in javascript then checking if complete. In Firefox, this seems to work great. In IE, it doesn't because the images appear to be loading on another thread. It works only if I put a delay between my assignment to image.src and when I check the image.complete property.

Using image.onload and image.onerror isn't working for me, either, because I need to pass a parameter to know which image I am talking about when the function is called. Any way of doing that seems to fail because it actually seems to pass the same function, not different instances of the same function. So the value I pass into it to identify the image always ends up being the last value in the loop. I cannot think of any way around this problem.

On Safari and Chrome, I am seeing the image.complete true and the naturalWidth set even when the error console shows a 404 for that image... and I intentionally removed that image to test this. But the above works well for Firefox and IE.

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Hmm, that's interesting. Would mind posting a code example so I want try a couple of things out? –  Xavi Dec 24 '11 at 11:21
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This is how I got it to work cross browser using a combination of the methods above (I also needed to insert images dynamically into the dom):

$('#domTarget').html('<img src="" />');

var url = '/some/image/path.png';

$('#domTarget img').load(function(){}).attr('src', url).error(function() {
    if ( isIE ) {
       var thisImg = this;
       setTimeout(function() {
          if ( ! thisImg.complete ) {
             $(thisImg).attr('src', '/web/css/img/picture-broken-url.png');
          }
       },250);
    } else {
       $(this).attr('src', '/web/css/img/picture-broken-url.png');
    }
});

Note: You will need to supply a valid boolean state for the isIE variable.

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Realtime network detector - check network status without refreshing the page: (it's not jquery, but tested, and 100% works:(tested on Firefox v25.0))

Code:

<script>
 function ImgLoad(myobj){
   var randomNum = Math.round(Math.random() * 10000);
   var oImg=new Image;
   oImg.src="YOUR_IMAGELINK"+"?rand="+randomNum;
   oImg.onload=function(){alert('Image succesfully loaded!')}
   oImg.onerror=function(){alert('No network connection or image is not available.')}
}
window.onload=ImgLoad();
</script>

<button id="reloadbtn" onclick="ImgLoad();">Again!</button>

if connection lost just press the Again button.

Update 1: Auto detect without refreshing the page:

<script>
     function ImgLoad(myobj){
       var randomNum = Math.round(Math.random() * 10000);
       var oImg=new Image;
       oImg.src="YOUR_IMAGELINK"+"?rand="+randomNum;
       oImg.onload=function(){networkstatus_div.innerHTML="";}
       oImg.onerror=function(){networkstatus_div.innerHTML="Service is not available. Please check your Internet connection!";}
}

networkchecker = window.setInterval(function(){window.onload=ImgLoad()},1000);
</script>

<div id="networkstatus_div"></div>
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