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I'm wondering if there is a way that I can make my code stricter with regard to user input?

I'm trying Exceptions / Try-Catch Blocks, and have to accept some user input and validate that it is the correct date type.

Is there a way that I can make the user input a strict double? i.e. I don't want the user to be able to input a value without a decimal point e.g. an int like 5 & have it be validated and converted to double, returning 5.0 - I want the user to be prompted to enter a double value strictly, making sure that a decimal point is part of the value entered.

Would using Wrappers or something like this be appropriate, and if so - how could I do this?

Current Code:

import java.util.Scanner;


public class InputExceptions {

    //Do we have to do any Wrapping / instanceOf Double ?
    //Can we accept an integer (no decimal point) for double entry ?

    private static int inputInt;
    private static double inputDouble;

    public static int inputInt() {

        Scanner kybd = new Scanner(System.in);
        boolean inputOK = false;
        while (inputOK == false) {
            System.out.println("*** Please Enter an Integer Value: ");
            try {
                inputInt = kybd.nextInt();
                kybd.nextLine();
                inputOK = true;
            } catch (Exception e) {
                System.out.println("*** ERROR: VALUE ENTERED NOT INTEGER ***");
                kybd.next();
            }
        }
        return inputInt;
    }

    public static double inputDouble() {
        Scanner kybd = new Scanner(System.in);
        boolean inputOK = false;
        while (inputOK == false) {
            System.out.println("*** Please Enter a Double Value: ");
            try {
                inputDouble = kybd.nextDouble();
             kybd.nextLine();
                inputOK = true;
            } catch (Exception e) {
                System.out.println("*** ERROR: VALUE ENTERED NOT DOUBLE ***");
                kybd.next();
            }
        }
        return inputDouble;
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        System.out.println("*** INTEGER Input: " + inputInt() + " ***");
        System.out.println("*** DOUBLE Input: " + inputDouble() + " ***");
    }

}
share|improve this question
    
Why can't you use the exception block that you already have? nextDouble is doing the validation. – Nishant Shreshth Nov 4 '13 at 23:01
    
Thanks for the response. As is, if I input a non-decimal value e.g. 12 - then I get 12.0 returned. I'm wanting to make it reject an int input e.g. 12 - & instead only accept a double input e.g. 12.0 I'm wondering if there is a way to make the code strict as desired? – flipd.d.mon Nov 4 '13 at 23:11

You can read the number as a String and check it contains a '.' character. This can be parsed with Double.parseDouble(String). Of course you can still enter 1.0 and is the same as entering 1. or 1

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the response. – flipd.d.mon Nov 4 '13 at 23:19
    
Do You know if it would be possible to get it to do what I want it to do using the Wrapper / instanceOf technique? – flipd.d.mon Nov 4 '13 at 23:20
    
@user2904978 what do you mean by "using the Wrapper / instanceOf technique"? please give an example. – vandale Nov 4 '13 at 23:30
    
-1 as this answer assumes that the dot (".") is the radix character. That doesn't hold for all possible locales. – Isaac Nov 4 '13 at 23:33
    
What I mean is checking if an object reference is to a specific Class e.g something like : if ( obj instanceOf Double) - where a primitive data type of double has been cast to primitive wrapper type Double? I'm dealing with some new concepts and I'm not sure if – flipd.d.mon Nov 4 '13 at 23:41

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