Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Is there any way to detect when the backspace/delete key is pressed in the iPhone keyboard on a UITextField that is empty? I want to know when backspace is pressed only if the UITextField is empty.


Based on the suggestion from @Alex Reynolds in a comment, I've added the following code while creating my text field:

[[NSNotificationCenter defaultCenter] addObserver:self
          selector:@selector(handleTextFieldChanged:)
              name:UITextFieldTextDidChangeNotification
            object:searchTextField];

This notification is received (handleTextFieldChanged function is called), but still not when I press the backspace key in an empty field. Any ideas?


There seems to be some confusion around this question. I want to receive a notification when the backspace key is pressed. That's it. But the solution must also work when the UITextField is already empty.

share|improve this question
    
I think you might mean "only if the UITextField is empty" rather than "only if the keyboard is empty"...? –  Steve Harrison Dec 30 '09 at 1:35
    
@Steve Harrison: thanks. Updated that. –  marcc Dec 30 '09 at 1:48
    
I'm trying to do something similar, what solution did you get then ? What I'm doing is a text field in a scroll view, when I type some text, suggestions are show and when I click one, a label object is placed on the left of the text field. Thanks in advance :D –  Dough Jun 16 '10 at 13:56
    
2011/11 solution for empty UITextField using runtime trickery: bjhomer.blogspot.com/2011/11/… –  Jano Nov 17 '11 at 16:36
    
Ridiculously long for something so trivial. This should not be difficult. –  Adam Waite Jan 21 '13 at 18:15
add comment

17 Answers

up vote 23 down vote accepted

This may be a long shot but it could work. Try setting the text field's text to a zero width space character \u200B. When backspace is pressed on a text field that appears empty, it will actually delete your space. Then you can just reinsert the space.

May not work if the user manages to move the caret to the left of the space.

share|improve this answer
    
Nice. I agree that it's pretty hacky, but I was considering something like this as a last resort. Thanks for the suggestion. –  marcc Dec 30 '09 at 23:11
1  
@Andrew, this is the approach I decided to take. It took a bit of code, but it's certainly effective. Thanks for the help instead of trying to tell me that I'm doing something wrong. –  marcc Jan 2 '10 at 3:20
    
This doesn't work on iPhone 3.1.3 –  MattDiPasquale Jul 9 '11 at 18:42
1  
This technique may work on iPhone > 3.1.3, but it's hacky and may break on future versions, etc. I think I found a cleaner, more stable solution for how to detect a delete keyboard key press on the iPhone/iOS. –  MattDiPasquale Jul 9 '11 at 22:24
2  
I can confirm that delete isn't detected if the user manages to move the cursor to the left of the space. If you can figure out how to fix that, then you should also subclass UITextField and implement canPerformAction:withSender: to return NO for select: and selectAll: actions when the text is equal to the string @"\u200B". –  MattDiPasquale Oct 19 '11 at 21:56
show 3 more comments

Check out UITextInput, specifically UIKeyInput has a deleteBackward delegate method that always gets called when the delete key is pressed. If you're doing something simple, then you might consider just subclassing UILabel and making it conform to the UIKeyInput protocol, as done by SimpleTextInput and this iPhone UIKeyInput Example. Note: UITextInput and its relatives (including UIKeyInput) are only available in iOS 3.2 and later.

share|improve this answer
    
This is the right answer. It's non-hacky and very simple with a quick subclass of UITextField. –  Sam Jul 4 '13 at 19:47
    
Just spotted Jacob's answer below. It gives a detailed example of this. –  Sam Jul 5 '13 at 14:26
    
It's worth noting that this answer does not work in iOS 5. If the text field is empty pressing backspace does not invoke this method. –  jfeldman Sep 16 '13 at 16:51
add comment

Subclass UITextField:

//Header
//MyTextField.h

//create delegate protocol
@protocol MyTextFieldDelegate <NSObject>
@optional
- (void)textFieldDidDelete;
@end

@interface MyTextField : UITextField<UIKeyInput>

//create "myDelegate"
@property (nonatomic, assign) id<MyTextFieldDelegate> myDelegate;
@end

//Implementation
#import "MyTextField.h"

@implementation MyTextField

- (void)deleteBackward {
    [super deleteBackward];

    if ([_myDelegate respondsToSelector:@selector(textFieldDidDelete)]) [_myDelegate textFieldDidDelete];
}

@end

Now simply add "MyTextFieldDelegate" to your ViewController and set your textfields "myDelegate" to "self":

//View Controller Header
#import "MyTextField.h"

//add "MyTextFieldDelegate" to you view controller
@interface ViewController : UIViewController <MyTextFieldDelegate>
@end

//View Controller Implementation
- (void)viewDidLoad {
    //initialize your text field
    MyTextField *input = [[MyTextField alloc] initWithFrame:CGRectMake(0, 0, 70, 30)];

    //set your view controller as "myDelegate"
    input.myDelegate = self;

    //add your text field to the view
    [self.view addSubview:input];
}

//MyTextField Delegate
- (void)textFieldDidDelete {
    NSLog(@"delete");
}
share|improve this answer
2  
This is the best solution. The answer accepted is a hack. Objective C is based on sub classing and this solution uses it properly to solve the problem. –  T.J. May 10 '13 at 14:44
    
Sadly, this only works for >= iOS 6 though –  jaetzold May 21 '13 at 14:37
    
Great answer, thanks. –  Nuzhat Zari Jan 17 at 10:08
add comment

Code like following:

@interface MyTextField : UITextField
@end

@implementation MyTextField

- (void)deleteBackward
{
    [super deleteBackward];

    //At here, you can handle backspace key pressed event even the text field is empty
}

@end

At last, do forget to change the Custom Class property of the Text Field to "MyTextField"

share|improve this answer
3  
This should be the accepted answer. Clean, and actually answers the question. –  Ryan Romanchuk Apr 29 '13 at 12:52
1  
It does answer the question... So long as you're targeting iOS 6.0+. On iOS 5, deleteBackward was simply never called on your subclass, unfortunately. –  BJ Homer Jun 5 '13 at 5:50
1  
BJ Homer, 93% of devices are on iOS 6, so not targeting iOS 5 is generally not such a big deal. –  Jonathan. Jun 24 '13 at 18:14
    
I'm glad I kept scrolling down enough to find this. 100% the right way to do this today in IOS 7. –  MusiGenesis Mar 1 at 17:33
add comment

I've founded other way easier than subclass solution. Even its little bit strange but its work ok.

- (BOOL)textView:(UITextView *)textView shouldChangeTextInRange:(NSRange)range replacementText:(NSString *)text
{
    const char * _char = [text cStringUsingEncoding:NSUTF8StringEncoding];
    int isBackSpace = strcmp(_char, "\b");

    if (isBackSpace == -8) {
       // is backspace
    }

    return YES;
}

It's a little bit strange for result of compare is -8. Maybe I'll wrong in some point of C Programming. But its right work ;)

share|improve this answer
    
This works only if the textView.text isn't empty. –  Split Jan 16 '13 at 9:46
1  
Backstroke isn't '\b' set. But if you carefully debugging then you will see '\0'. So I get the result 0 that is two values are equal in strcmp method. const char *stoke = [text cStringUsingEncoding:NSASCIIStringEncoding]; const char *backstroke = "\0";// this is equal to \b->"\x08"; strcmp(backstroke, stoke); –  Yoon Lee Jan 19 '13 at 1:31
    
Also, by the definition of strcmp(s1, s2), returns 0 if s1 == s2, > 0 s1 is has lexicographically greater than s2 vice versa. –  Yoon Lee Jan 19 '13 at 1:39
add comment

Try the delegate

- (BOOL)textField:(UITextField *)textField shouldChangeCharactersInRange:(NSRange)range replacementString:(NSString *)string {

Then check if the range.length == 1 which seems to be the case when backspace is hit.

share|improve this answer
    
Only called when field is non-empty, though. Note the original question. :) –  Eric Goldberg Jun 19 '12 at 21:48
    
Use UITextView for this. –  Oleg Mar 21 '13 at 10:21
add comment

Niklas Alvaeus's answer helped me out with a similar issue

I was limiting entry to a specific character set... but it was ignoring backspaces... so I had it check range.length == 1 before triming the string... it it was true i just return the string and don't trim it. See below

 - (BOOL) textField:(UITextField *)textField shouldChangeCharactersInRange:(NSRange)range replacementString:(NSString *)string
 {
     NSCharacterSet *nonNumberSet = [[NSCharacterSet characterSetWithCharactersInString:@"0123456789."] invertedSet];

    if (range.length == 1) {
       return string;
    }
    else {
       return ([string stringByTrimmingCharactersInSet:nonNumberSet].length > 0);
    }   
 }
share|improve this answer
    
The method expects a boolean and not a string as return value –  Pascalius Aug 13 '12 at 11:52
    
Worked anyway though... just change it –  Ben Call Sep 27 '12 at 16:02
add comment

:) just for the title "Detect backspace", where I use UIKeyboardTypeNumberPad.

I also meet the same question tonight, and following is my code to find it out:

- (BOOL)textField:(UITextField *)textField shouldChangeCharactersInRange:(NSRange)range replacementString:(NSString *)string
{
    NSLog([NSString stringWithFormat:@"%d", [string length]]);

Because with UIKeyboardTypeNumberPad, user can only input Number or backspace, so when the length of string is 0, it must be backspace key.

Hope the above will do some help.

share|improve this answer
add comment

In iOS 6, the deleteBackward method is called on the UITextField when backspace is pressed, including when the field is empty. So you can subclass UITextField and provide your own deleteBackward implementation (invoking super's as well.)

I'm still supporting iOS 5 though so I'll need a combination of Andrew's answer and this.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Rather than trying to preconstruct what WILL BE in the text field or figure out what special character has been entered in the shouldChangeCharactersInRange method, I would suggest doing the following:

[self performSelector:@selector(manageSearchResultsDisplay) withObject:nil afterDelay:0];

This allows you to call a method directly after the current operation completes. What's cool about this is that, by the time it completes, the modified value will already be in the field. At that point, you can just check its length and/or validate based on what's there.

share|improve this answer
3  
Plus, it's not hacky –  Aaron Dec 4 '12 at 20:20
add comment

in UITextViewDelegate:

- (BOOL)textView:(UITextView *)textView shouldChangeTextInRange:(NSRange)range replacementText:(NSString *)text
{
    if(text isEqualToString:@"");
    {
        NSLog(@"press backspace.");
    }
}

it works ok for me.

update for Chinese simplified pinyin and Chinese handwriting input:

- (BOOL)textView:(UITextView *)textView shouldChangeTextInRange:(NSRange)range replacementText:(NSString *)text
{
    if (range.length > 0 && [text isEqualToString:@""]) {
        NSLog(@"press Backspace.");
    }
    return YES;
}

base on the document says:

"If the user presses the Delete key, the length of the range is 1 and an empty string object replaces that single character."

share|improve this answer
add comment

To Keep it Simple here is the only condition u need to check

     if (range.length==1)
share|improve this answer
add comment

The best use that I have found for detecting backspace is detecting when the user has pressed backspace in an empty text field. For example, if you have 'bubbled' recipients in the Mail app, when you hit backspace in the text field, it selects the last 'bubbled' recipient.

This can be done in a similar way to Jacob Caraballo's answer. But in Jacob's answer, if the text field has one character left when you hit backspace, by the time the delegate message is received, the text field will already be empty, so you're effectively detecting backspace on a text field with at most one characters.

Actually, if you want to detect backspace on a text field with exactly zero characters (empty), then you should send the message to the delegate before the call to super deleteBackward. For example:

#import "MyTextField.h"

//Text field that detects when backspace is hit with empty text
@implementation MyTextField

#pragma mark - UIKeyInput protocol
-(void)deleteBackward
{
    BOOL isTextFieldEmpty = (self.text.length == 0);
    if (isTextFieldEmpty) {
        if ([self.delegate respondsToSelector:@selector(textFieldDidHitBackspaceWithEmptyText:)]) {
            [self.delegate textFieldDidHitBackspaceWithEmptyText:self];
        }
    }

    [super deleteBackward];
}
@end

The interface for such a text field would look something like this:

@protocol MyTextFieldDelegate;

@interface MyTextField : UITextField
@property(nonatomic, weak) id<MyTextFieldDelegate> delegate;
@end

@protocol MyTextFieldDelegate <UITextFieldDelegate>
@optional
-(void)textFieldDidHitBackspaceWithEmptyText:(MyTextField *)textField;
@end
share|improve this answer
add comment
+ (BOOL)detectBackspaceOnly:(NSString *)string
{
    for(int i=0 ; i<string.length ; i++){
        unichar caract = [string characterAtIndex:i];
        if(caract != ' ' && caract != '\n')
            return NO;
    }

    return YES;
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

Something like this:

- (BOOL)textField:(UITextField *)textField shouldChangeCharactersInRange:(NSRange)range replacementString:(NSString *)string {  
    if (![text hash] && ![textField.text length])  
        [self backspaceInEmptyTextField];  
}

of course the hash is for one character string.

share|improve this answer
    
Why the downvote? –  Austin Henley Oct 5 '12 at 21:01
add comment

Why. Someone could probably offer an alternative if you tell us what you want to do when Backspace is pressed on an empty text field.

share|improve this answer
    
I want to update another field. It's for a custom control. It's an unusual use case, but I can assure you that Apple is doing the same thing in their SMS app. –  marcc Dec 30 '09 at 23:51
    
Where? When I use the SMS app nothing happens if I use backspace in an empty message field, either on the To line in a new message or the text entry field for the message itself (which I'm pretty sure is a UITextView). If we know the exact behavior you are trying to replicate, it may lead to a good clue as to how they are making it work. –  Kendall Helmstetter Gelner Dec 31 '09 at 21:57
    
Address an SMS message to an existing contact. Now put the cursor in the empty text field to the right of this contact. Press backspace. Something happens. I know this is a very custom control and I'm trying to do something somewhat similar, but creating my own control. –  marcc Jan 2 '10 at 3:21
    
Aha, now I see what you mean... the interesting thing to me, is that I'm not sure that text field is empty. It's almost as if they have painted a bubble around text in the text field, so when you hit "back" it's really just deleting a space and changing the overlay... Another alternative might be to try placing a button over the keyboard "backspace" button. to intercept the press until something is typed in the field. –  Kendall Helmstetter Gelner Jan 2 '10 at 20:11
    
Another great use case: the Square app. When you press backspace on a the credit card CVV field enough times, it re-focuses the expiration date field. –  Eric Goldberg Jun 19 '12 at 21:50
add comment

I found an other solution:

- (BOOL)textField:(UITextField *)textField shouldChangeCharactersInRange:(NSRange)range replacementString:(NSString *)string {
    if ([textField.text length] == 0 && [string length] == 0) {
        // The textfield is empty and backspace is pressed
    }
}

To work with this method, you should set the textfield's delegate.
Since the backspace is the only button on iOS keyboard, which provides 0 length when it is pressed, you can use it for this purpose. I also tested the return button, but it has a value: "\n". If you have other type of return button (search, next or something else), then you should test against those buttons too.

share|improve this answer
    
Read the question again - this doesn't work on empty text field. –  Sulthan Sep 13 '11 at 14:22
    
It was working for me. Thank you :) –  Infinite Possibilities Sep 13 '11 at 19:27
    
And this is a proper answer to the question. Maybe you should try it out first. However, I feel sorry for trying to help. Thank you! :) –  Infinite Possibilities Sep 13 '11 at 19:34
    
I tried it. When the text field is empty and you press backspace, this callback is not triggerred. That's why the correct answer adds invisible characters. –  Sulthan Oct 1 '11 at 11:35
    
Maybe you are right... ;) –  Infinite Possibilities Oct 3 '11 at 7:57
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.