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I am trying to set up some Ruby code so that I can dynamically define a new class. My code right now is as shown below, which I thought would work, but it's not working though, and I'm kind of confused why not.

def define_new_class(&block)
  new_class = Class.new(MyClass) do
    yield
  end
end

define_new_class do
  attr_accessor :my_accessor_1

  def initialize
    puts "Hello"
  end
end

Any insight would be greatly appreciated!

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1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You were close, but there were a couple of things off. First the argument to Class.new defines the superclass of the new class, but MyClass was not defined. Secondly you actually want to evaluate the block within the context of the class you are defining instead of just yielding to that block - therefore the instance_eval

def define_new_class(&block)
  new_class = Class.new do
    self.instance_eval &block
  end
end

a = define_new_class do
  attr_accessor :my_accessor_1

  def initialize
    puts "Hello"
  end
end

My guess is that the reason you had MyClass in the first place is that you want the resulting class to be referenceable as MyClass If that is the case, you could do something like

Object.const_set('MyClass', a)

so in one big happy method:

def define_new_class(name, &block)
  new_class = Class.new do
    self.instance_eval &block
  end
  Object.const_set(name, new_class)
end

define_new_class('MyClass') do
  attr_accessor :my_accessor_1

  def initialize
    puts "Hello"
  end
end

a = MyClass.new #=> #<MyClass:0x007f8baaaf72c8>
a.my_accessor_1 = 1 #=> 1
a.my_accessor_1 # => 1
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I was just using MyClass as a placeholder - it is defined elsewhere. I set the constant in a different part of the code. I'll give your instance_eval solution a try! –  Bryce Nov 5 '13 at 0:53
    
Alex, I've wondered where Module#const_set might be used. This was helpful in that regard. One small thing: I don't think you need to preface instance_eval with self.. I've notice self. is often added where it's not needed. Is that to some extent a stylistic preference? –  Cary Swoveland Nov 5 '13 at 1:38
    
Yeah definitely a stylistic choice on my part. Just wanted to make it super clear under what context the block was being evaluated. I've heard opinions that you should mostly restrict self to attribute setters, but I tend to throw it in more often. –  Alex.Bullard Nov 5 '13 at 18:32

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