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I'm making a program with a superclass called Experiment and a subclass of Group with a subclass of Subject. When I hit printFinalExperiment I want it to print out the group name and all the Subjects contained within the groups, but whenever i try that it prints out all the subjects, and i cant figure out why. I am just learning java and this is probably really inefficient, but I've been experimenting with different types of lists to try to solve this problem, but i cant figure out what to do. Also is there an easier way to arrange my arraylist of subjects in alphabetical order by their name instead of having to create a separate arraylist of strings? seen in alphabetize method in experiment class.

//class Experiment

import java.util.Random;
import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.Collections;
import java.util.HashMap;
import java.util.TreeSet;

public class Experiment
{
public Random number;
public ArrayList<String> allSubject;
public ArrayList<Subject> allSubjects,alphaSubjects,matched;
public ArrayList<Group> experiment;
public int value,groups;
private ArrayList<Integer> numbers;
/**
 * Make a new Experiment.  Then use method addSubject to add
 * Subjects to your experiment.  Then call the assignGroups
 * method to assign Subjects to each group.
 */
public Experiment(int numberOfGroups)
{
    groups = numberOfGroups;
    number = new Random();
    numbers = new ArrayList<Integer>();
    experiment = new ArrayList<Group>();
    matched = new ArrayList<Subject>();
    allSubjects = new ArrayList<Subject>(); 
    allSubject = new ArrayList<String>();
    alphaSubjects = new ArrayList<Subject>();
    for(int i = 0; i < numberOfGroups; i++)
    {
        experiment.add(new Group(i));
    }
}
/**
 * Input the number of desired subjects and groups
 * for you experiment.  This will create the number
 * of groups specified and will assign the subjects 
 * as close to even as possible.
 */
public Experiment(int numberOfSubjects, int numberOfGroups)
{
    number = new Random();
    numbers = new ArrayList<Integer>();
    experiment = new ArrayList<Group>();
    matched = new ArrayList<Subject>();
    allSubjects = new ArrayList<Subject>(); 
    allSubject = new ArrayList<String>();
    alphaSubjects = new ArrayList<Subject>(); 
    for(int i=0;i<numberOfSubjects;i++)
    {
        addDefaultSubject(i);
    }
    assignGroups(numberOfGroups);
    printDefaultExper();
}


/**
 * Adds a new Subject to the experiment.
 */
public void addSubject(String name, String description)
{
    allSubjects.add(new Subject(name,description));
    allSubject.add(name.toLowerCase());
}
/**
 *Used only for the second constructor.
 */
private void addDefaultSubject(int i)
{
    allSubjects.add(new Subject(i));
    allSubject.add(allSubjects.get(i).getName().toLowerCase());
}


/**
 * Alphabetizes the list of Subjects based on their
 * name input by the user.  As of right now, this method
 * is case sensitive meaning Strings starting with 
 * capitals will be listed before those without capitals.
 */
private void alphabetize()
{
       alphaSubjects.clear();
       Collections.sort(allSubject);
        //compare the String arraylist to the subject arraylist to reset the subject     arraylist indeces in alphabetical order.

       for(int i =0;i<allSubject.size();i++)
       {
        String theName = allSubject.get(i);
         for(Subject subject:allSubjects)
        {
          if(subject.getName().toLowerCase().contains(theName))
         {
            alphaSubjects.add(new Subject(subject.getName(),subject.getDescription()));
         }
        }
       }
}
/**
 * Creates random numbers from 0 to 
 * the number of Subjects in the experiment.
 */
private void randomize()
{
    alphabetize();
    value = number.nextInt(allSubjects.size());
    for(int i = 0; i < allSubjects.size();i++)
    {
        while(numbers.contains(value))
        {
            value = number.nextInt(allSubjects.size());
        }
        numbers.add(value);
    }
}
/**
 * Assigns the numbers created randomly by
 * Blue Jay's random number generator to the
 * alphabetized list Subjects.
 */
public void assignNumbers()
{
    matched.clear();
    numbers.clear();
    randomize();
    for(int i =0; i < numbers.size();i++)
    {
       matched.add(alphaSubjects.get(numbers.get(i)));
       experiment.get(i%groups).addSubject(matched.get(i));
    }
}
//The previous method and the next method are what i was trouble shooting so either one can be changed.  
/**
 * Splits subjects into groups.  Every nth (n is the number of
 * groups input) is assign to a new group.  For example:
 * Say you have 17 subjects (0-16) and you want 4 groups.
 * Subjects 0,4,8,12, and 16 will be in group 1, subjects
 * 1,5,9,and 13 will be in group 2 and so on until 4 complete
 * groups are made.
 */
public void assignGroups(int numberOfGroups)
{
    numbers.clear();
    assignNumbers();
    if(numberOfGroups <=0)
    {
        System.out.println("You need at least one group.");
    }
    else{
       int numberOfSubjects = allSubjects.size();
       experiment = new ArrayList<Group>();
       for(int i = 0; i < numberOfGroups; i++)
       {
           Group group = new Group(i);
         for(Integer j = i; j < matched.size(); j+=numberOfGroups)
         {
             group.addSubjects(matched.get(j).getName(),matched.get(j).getDescription());
         }
         experiment.add(group);
       }
    }
}


/**
 * Prints the final layout of the Groups with its
 * subjects in alphabetical order
 */
public void printFinalExperiment()
{
    for(Group group: experiment)
    {
        System.out.println("Group " + group.getGroupName());
        group.printGroupList();
    }
    System.out.println();
}
//this next method is only used for the second constructor.
private void printDefaultExper()
{
    for(Group group: experiment)
    {
        System.out.println("Group " + group.getGroupName());
        System.out.println("   " + group.getSize());
    }
    System.out.println();
}

//class group

import java.util.ArrayList;
public class Group
{
// instance variables - replace the example below with your own
public static ArrayList<Subject> group;
public  int groupNumber;
public int size;
public  String groupName;

public Group(int groupNumber)
{
    this.groupNumber = groupNumber;
    groupName = "Group" + groupNumber;
    group = new ArrayList<Subject>();
}
public Group(String groupName)
{
    this.groupName=groupName;
    group = new ArrayList<Subject>();
}
public void addSubject(Subject subject)
{
    group.add(subject);
}
public void addSubjects(String name,String description)
{
    group.add(new Subject(name,description));
}
public int getGroupNumber()
{
    return groupNumber;
}
public int getSize()
{
    size = group.size();
    return size;
}
public String getGroupName()
{
    return groupName;
}
public void printGroupList()
{
    for(Subject subject: group)
    {
        System.out.println("       " + subject.getName() + ": " + subject.getDescription());
    }
}

}

//class Subject

public class Subject
{
public final String name;
public final String description;
public Subject(String name, String description)
{
    this.name = name;
    this.description = description;
}
public Subject(int aNumber)
{
    name = "Subject" + aNumber;
    aNumber++;
    description = "default";
}
public String getName()
{
    return name;
}
public String getDescription()
{
    return description;
}

}

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1 Answer 1

This may have to do with the way you declared the ArrayList group in your Group class.

Is there any reason you declared it as static? Non-static instance variables mean that each instance of your class, in this case each Group object, will have its own group ArrayList. On the other hand, static instance variables are variables that are associated with the class in a general sense. Each Group object you instantiate will not have its own group ArrayList in your case.

Try making it a non-static instance variable (by simply deleting the word static.)

Also, here's a link to better explain the difference between static and non-static in Java: http://www.caveofprogramming.com/articles/java/java-for-beginners-static-variables-what-are-they/

share|improve this answer
    
thank you soooooooo much. It worked. I totally forgot about that. I had added it to the arraylist to show my classmate how you would use static to initialize a static variable but forgot to take it out. –  Mr. Meeshmew Nov 5 '13 at 5:53
    
No problem, glad to help. One more thing - make sure you have good reason declare certain instance variables as public. You wouldn't want anyone that can access your class to be able to modify all of your instance variables unless this is what you really intend. More often then not, you should declare them as private and simply define methods to allow users of your class to access them only in ways you see fit. –  Marcel Puyat Nov 5 '13 at 6:16

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