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I want to store ranges of IPs into database. The problem is that some IPs are ipv4 and some ipv6. I want to convert all to ipv6 then store into database. for example: according to converter:

192.168.1.100 => 0:0:0:0:0:ffff:c0a8:164

What makes problem is that php treats them in different way:

echo bin2hex(inet_pton('192.168.1.100'));
c0a80164

echo bin2hex(inet_pton('0:0:0:0:0:ffff:c0a8:164'));
00000000000000000000ffffc0a80164

echo bin2hex(inet_pton('0000:0000:0000:0000:0000:0000:192.168.1.100'));
000000000000000000000000c0a80164

to me it is so important that ip comparison(especially for ipv4) can be done in database with no problem.

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1  
An IPv4 address is not the same as an IPv6 address. You can't convert one into the other - they are different beasts. It's no surprise that PHP treats them differently. – user1864610 Nov 5 '13 at 7:32
    
AFAIK, IPv6 is IPv4 compatible too. – werva Nov 5 '13 at 7:33
2  
@werva Then you know wrong. There are gateways between the networks, but in general, they are separated. Better store your IPv4 addresses in the short form so they can more easily be distinguished. – glglgl Nov 5 '13 at 7:34
    
@glglgl, so do you mean that i should store them into two different tables? – werva Nov 5 '13 at 7:37
    
@werva No, but maybe as a varchar/varbinary so you immediately can detect the different lengths, and maybe even add a byte for the address family field needed when connecting. But the latter is optional; if you only have IPv4 and IPv6 addresses, the length is enough. – glglgl Nov 5 '13 at 7:39
up vote 1 down vote accepted

I think it is not a good idea to store IPv4 addresses exactly like IPv6 addresses.

They are completely different things.

You may encounter the :ffff: version if you run a server which listens on an IPv6 socket woth IPV6ONLY disabled. Then, you'll notice the IPv4 host 192.168.1.100 connecting as ::ffff:c0a8:164. But you cannot connect to this address via IPv6 - for this purpose, you'd need an IPv4 socket. So better store the addresses in short form which makes it much easier to distinguish between them via the length.

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1  
i found this link useful too. – werva Nov 5 '13 at 7:40

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