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Let's have a look on three following classes:

class IntTab0 {
    private:
        int length;
        int* data;

    public:
        IntTab0(): length(0), data(nullptr) {}

        IntTab0(int size): length(size) {
            assert(size > 0);
            data = new int[length];
        }

        IntTab0(const IntTab0& rhs): length(0), data(nullptr) {
            if (rhs.data) {
                length = rhs.length;
                data = new int(*rhs.data);
            }
        }

        ~IntTab0() {
            delete[] data;
        }

        void swap(IntTab0& second) {
            using std::swap;
            swap(length, second.length);
            swap(data, second.data);
        }
};

class IntTab1 : public IntTab0 {
    public:
        IntTab1(): IntTab0() {}
        IntTab1(int size): IntTab0(size) {}
        IntTab1(const IntTab1& rhs): IntTab0(rhs) {}

        IntTab1(IntTab1&& rhs) noexcept {
            swap(rhs);
        }

        IntTab1& operator=(IntTab1&& rhs) noexcept {
            swap(rhs);
            return *this;
        }
};

class IntTab2 : public IntTab0 {
    public:
        IntTab2(): IntTab0() {}
        IntTab2(int size) : IntTab0(size) {}
        IntTab2(const IntTab2& rhs): IntTab0(rhs) {}

        IntTab2(IntTab2&& rhs) {
            swap(rhs);
        }

        IntTab2& operator=(IntTab2&& rhs) {
            swap(rhs);
            return *this;
        }
};

I have also a function to measure a performance each of them:

template<class Value>
void test_Performance() {
    std::vector <Value> vit;

    std::chrono::time_point<std::chrono::system_clock> start, end;
    start = std::chrono::system_clock::now();

    for (int i = 0; i < 100000; i++) {
        Value it(5);
        vit.push_back(it);
    }
    std::vector <Value> vitCopy(std::move(vit));

    end = std::chrono::system_clock::now();

    std::chrono::duration<double> elapsed_seconds = end-start;
    std::cout << "elapsed time for IntTab" << it++ << ": " << elapsed_seconds.count() << "s\n";
}

What I don't quite understand is the result of running this performance test for each instance of my classes. I suspected IntTab1 should be the fastest one as it uses move constructor and move assignment operator with noexcept. In fact, on my environment results are opposite - the fastest one is the C++98 version using only copy constructor and assignment operator. Here are my results:

elapsed time for IntTab: 2.2873e-05s

elapsed time for IntTab1: 2.4139e-05s

elapsed time for IntTab2: 2.3554e-05s

Could someone explain this strange behaviour?

EDIT

According to comments about wrong copy-constructor (not doing real deep-copy) - I have a testing function which, I assume, tests this behaviour:

void test_IntTab( void ) {
    IntTab0 it( 5 );
    it[0] = 10;
    it[4] = 20;
    assert( it.size() == 5 );
    assert( it[0] == 10 );
    assert( it[4] == 20 );

    IntTab0 iu( 10 );
    iu[0] = 17;
    iu[4] = 34;
    assert( iu.size() == 10 );
    assert( iu[0] == 17 );
    assert( iu[4] == 34 );

    iu.swap( it );
    assert( iu.size() == 5 );
    assert( iu[0] == 10 );
    assert( it.size() == 10 );
    assert( it[0] == 17 );

    IntTab0 is( iu );
    assert( is.size() == 5 );
    assert( is[0] == 10 );

    IntTab0 iw;
    iw = it;
    assert( iw.size() == 10 );
    assert( iw[0] == 17 );

    it[0] = 1;
    iu[0] = 2;
    is[0] = 3;
    iw[0] = 4;

    assert( it[0] == 1 );
    assert( iu[0] == 2 );
    assert( is[0] == 3 );
    assert( iw[0] == 4 );
}

If my copy-constructor is not working properly, why this function runs correctly?

share|improve this question
8  
How did you compile your code? Also, you're in the range of tens of microseconds. That might have to do with scheduling and other OS-related stuff, not necessarily with bad performance. Try to run for a longer period of time, in the range of seconds preferrably. –  arne Nov 5 '13 at 7:50
1  
Did you estimate statistical error of measurements? What happens if you rerun the code? –  klm123 Nov 5 '13 at 7:53
8  
You have a problem in your copy-constructor. The statement data = new int(*rhs.data); allocates one integer, and initializes it to *rhs.data. Thus doing e.g. delete[] data is undefined behavior. –  Joachim Pileborg Nov 5 '13 at 7:53
2  
Maybe I just don't understand your code, but your copy constructor for IntTab probably does not do the right thing. –  Markus Mayr Nov 5 '13 at 7:54
4  
I don't think you measure anything at all by computing vitCopy only once. Do it in a (preferably) long loop. The measurement error is bigger than values you try to measure otherwise. –  vines Nov 5 '13 at 7:54

1 Answer 1

Your copy-constructor doesn't copy the whole data properly.

You don't copy the content in copy-constructor and it just allocates memory. So, it's not complete copy-constructor. This incomplete method should be faster than the move constructor.

    IntTab0(const IntTab0& rhs): length(0), data(nullptr) {
        if (rhs.data) {
            length = rhs.length;
            data = new int(*rhs.data);

            ///////////////////////////////////////////
            // Assuming data is an array             //
            // std::copy from rhs.data to this->data //
            ///////////////////////////////////////////
        }
    }

If your copy-constructor doesn't have to deep copy members, then moving it has not many advantages rather than copying.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. But if my copy-constructor doesn't do deep-copy, why do my testing function run correctly? –  Mateusz Kowalski Nov 5 '13 at 8:15
3  
Sheer luck. These kinds of errors are like playing russian roulette: sometimes you get lucky and there's no bullet in the barrel. Try it a few thousand times and the program will break. In your particular case having the program fail silently is bad luck. –  Marc Claesen Nov 5 '13 at 8:15
1  
@MateuszKowalski: You're copy constructor should copy the content, use std::copy or a loop to copy items from rhs to itself. –  M M. Nov 5 '13 at 8:17

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