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Here is the case:

I want to describe an histogram as the sum of several distributions, and thus to fit these distributions on that histogram. In ROOT/C++ that is pretty obvious, but I look for the equivalent in R. Here is a self-explanatory exemple:

## SUM OF TWO GAUSSIANS OF DIFFERENT WIDTHS
x=rnorm(n=1000,mean=0,sd=1)
y=rnorm(n=1000,mean=0,sd=3)
z=append(x,y)
b=seq(-10,10,by=0.25)
hist(z,breaks=b)

In this case the individual contributions (x) and (y) are known, and I can extract their density curves with a Kernel:

## NARROW GAUSSIAN
hist(x,prob=T,breaks=b)
dx=density(x,ker="epan")
lines(dx,col=3,lwd=2)

## WIDE GAUSSIAN
hist(y,prob=T,breaks=b)
dy=density(y,ker="epan")
lines(dy,col=2,lwd=2)

I would like to do something like z~dx+dy

Where the fractions of dx and dy would be the parameters to be fitted. Looking into the R documentation I have only found references to single regression and smoothing.

Does anyone have a clue or a sympathetic link?

Thanks in advance, X.

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Not clear what you're after, but R has syntax for formulas and is perfectly happy to fit a function to a formula like z~a*dx+b*dy . However, splitting an arbitrary dataset into 2 (or more) kernel density functions is a really nasty beast. If the two peaks,for example, are not clearly resolvable, there's no reliable way to fit two kernels to your data. –  Carl Witthoft Nov 5 '13 at 12:34
    
Thanks for your answer. You are right, but the kernels would not be estimated from the data, I would extract them from a simulation. What do you mean by fitting a function: lm(z~a*dx+b*dy) ? –  Xavier Prudent Nov 5 '13 at 14:56
    
See ?lm for more details on formula usage in fitting functions. –  Carl Witthoft Nov 5 '13 at 16:32
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1 Answer 1

I found a way, but ignoring the kernel:

x=rnorm(n=10000,mean=0,sd=1)
y=rnorm(n=10000,mean=0,sd=3)
z=append(x,y)
x=subset(x,abs(x)<=10)
y=subset(y,abs(y)<=10)
z=subset(z,abs(z)<=10)
hx=hist(x,prob=T,breaks=b)
hy=hist(y,prob=T,breaks=b)
hz=hist(z,prob=T,breaks=b)

lm(formula=as.formula(hz$intensities~hx$intensities+hy$intensities))

Call: lm(formula = as.formula(hz$intensities ~ hx$intensities + hy$intensities))

Coefficients: (Intercept) hx$intensities hy$intensities
4.344e-17 5.002e-01 4.998e-01

That assumes that the template histograms are reliable (enough entries, relevant binning). I will meanwhile dig further to see how that can be applied to the fit of kernels, given that lm(formula=as.formula(hz$intensities~dx$y+dy$y)) lm(formula=as.formula(z~dx$y+dy$y)) end up with the error: variable lengths differ (found for 'dx$y')

as the kernel is estimated from the full set (x) and not the histogram hx.

Thanks, greetings to Massachusetts!

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