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Basically what I'm trying to do is move lines 1 through 4 from A.txt
and replace the lines 5 through 8 in B.txt with them.
I figured out how to get the first four lines with sed,
but I cannot figure out how to "send" them to replace the lines in the second txt file.

cat A.txt
1 a
2 b
3 c
4 d
5 e


cat B.txt
one
two
three
four
five
six
seven
eigh
nine

Result

one
two
three
four
1 a
2 b
3 c
4 d
nine
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4 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted
#!/usr/local/bin/bash -x

sed -n '1,4p' B.txt > B.txt.tmp
sed -n '1,4p' A.txt >> B.txt.tmp
sed -n '9p' B.txt >> B.txt.tmp

mv B.txt B.txt.bak
mv B.txt.tmp B.txt

This is static. Still, as long as you know your line addresses, this will work.

If you want support for variable span lengths, you will need to do something like this in your files:-

#----------numbers-begin----------
one
two
three
four
#----------numbers-end----------

From there, you can get to them inside the file with:-

sed -n '/--numbers-begin--/,/--numbers-end--/p' <filename> > newfile

Not only does that give you anchors to play with, but sed printing is my own preferred method of importing strings for variables in scripts, because it doesn't cause the shell to try and literally interpret the text as a command, as cat does for some reason.

The other thing that you can do in future files, is something like this:-

numbers:one
numbers:two
numbers:three
numbers:four
words:dog
words:cat
words:rat

Then:-

#!/usr/local/bin/bash

for i in $(sed -n '/^/,/$/p' file)
do
   if [ $(echo ${i} | sed -n '/numbers/p' ]
   then
   echo ${i} | cut -d':' -f2 >> numbers-only-file
   fi
done

Data structuring. It's all about the data structuring. Structure your data properly, and you will have practically no work at all.

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Thanks the "static" code that you provided worked wonders for what I needed it for thank you :) –  VangardMk Dec 5 '13 at 14:38
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This might work for you (GNU sed):

sed -i -e '5,8R a.txt' -e '5,8d' b.txt
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for your example, this awk one-liner works too:

awk 'NR>4&&NR<9{getline $0<"a.txt"}7' b.txt

this prints the expected output, you need play with redirection if you want to save it back to b.txt.

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You can also remove the space between getline and $0 too ;) –  Jotne Nov 5 '13 at 13:01
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This awk should do:

awk 'FNR==NR {a[NR]=$0;next} FNR>=5 && FNR<=8 {$0=a[FNR-4]}1' A.txt B.txt > tmp && mv tmp B.txt

It stores the lines of A.txt in an array named a
Then if line number of B.txt is between 5 and 8 replace value using info from array a
Result is stored in a temp file tmp and then moved back to B.txt

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Instead of awk ... > tm ; mv tmp B.txt it is normally best practice to do awk ... && mv ..., so that if the first command fails, the second won't be executed. –  fedorqui Nov 5 '13 at 12:24
    
Corrected, thanks –  Jotne Nov 5 '13 at 12:27
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