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I'm very new to Python and am having trouble trying to write a replace function. The aim is to display a list, and then display the same list with a character being changed.

The code being used to call the function is:

str_list = ['s', 'h', 'r', 'u', 'g', 'g', 'e', 'd']

print("\nreplace Test")
new_str = list_function.replace(str_list, 'g', 'z')
print(list_function.to_string(str_list))
print(list_function.to_string(new_str))

new_str = list_function.replace(str_list, 'a', 'y')
print(list_function.to_string(new_str))

The code defining the function is:

def replace(my_list, old_value, new_value):
    new_list = my_list
    for k in range(0, length(new_list)):
        if new_list[k] == old_value:
            new_list[k] = new_value
    return my_list

However when I run the program, the output is:

replace Test
s, h, r, u, z, z, e, d
s, h, r, u, z, z, e, d
s, h, r, u, z, z, e, d

I'd like only the second list to be altered, and I ran the debugger and found out that str_list is being altered as well as new_list, but I just cannot work out what I'm doing wrong. Any help would be greatly appreciated.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

when you do

new_list = my_list

you are not copying the list, but assigning the reference to a new variable. What you need is

new_list = my_list[:]

my_list[:] actually creates a new copy in the memory. With that change, the program produces

replace Test
s, h, r, u, g, g, e, d
s, h, r, u, g, g, e, d
s, h, r, u, g, g, e, d

You can confirm whether the new copy is getting created or not using id in CPython.

new_list = my_list
print id(new_list), id(my_list)

will print the same address twice, which means that they both are pointing to the same element.

new_list = my_list[:]
print id(new_list), id(my_list)

will print two different addresses.

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Thank you very much, I've been spending hours trying to fix this and it was something so small. –  Dylsbo Nov 5 '13 at 13:01
    
@user2956299 I am glad I could be of help. Please consider upvoting and accepting this as the answer if it helps you meta.stackexchange.com/a/5235/235416 –  thefourtheye Nov 5 '13 at 13:01

The best way to understand the difference is with some examples.

a = []
b = []

id(a)==id(b)
#False

a = []
b = a

id(a)==id(b)
#True

The id function simply returns the object’s unique id or object’s memory address.

Now to create a list with the same elements of a but with different id you can do the following:

a = [1,2,3,4,5]
#Both works
b = list(a) 
b = a[:]

id(a)==id(b)
#False

list() works with a generator, [:] doesn't. list() will construct a new list based on the sequence given. Most of the times list() can be replace by [:].

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