Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

Suppose I have a class template A, and non-template class B inheriting from A. While A compiles OK, compiling B triggers linker errors. Specifically,

A.hpp

#ifndef A_HPP_INCLUDED
#define A_HPP_INCLUDED

template <typename T>
class A { 
public:
    A();
    A(A<T>&& );
    virtual ~A();

    /* ... */
protected:
    T x;
};
#include A.tpp
#endif

A.tpp

#include "A.hpp"

template <typename T>
A<T>::A() { ... }

template <typename T>
A<T>::A(A<T>&& other)
   : x(std::move(other.x)) { }

template <typename T>
A<T>::~A() { ... }

testA.cpp

#include "A.hpp"

int main() {

    A<std::string> a;

    /* ... */

    return 0;
}

Compiling testA.cpp as follows is successful:

$ g++ -std=c++11 testA.cpp <- OK

Next up is non-template class B inheriting from A:

B.hpp

#ifndef B_HPP_INCLUDED
#define B_HPP_INCLUDED
#include "A.hpp"
class B
    : public A<std::string> {
public:
    B();
    virtual ~B();

    static A<std::string> foo();
};
#endif

B.cpp

#include "B.hpp"

B::B()
    : A(std::move(foo())) { }

B::~B() { }

A<std::string> B::foo() { ... }

testB.cpp

#include "B.hpp"

int main() {
    B b;

    /* ... */

    return 0;
}

Compilation of testB.cpp seems to go ok, but the linker is not a happy camper:

Attempt 1

$ g++ -std=c++11 testB.cpp   
Undefined references to B(), and ~B()
collect2: error: ld returned 1 exit status

Attempt 2

$ g++ -std=c++11 testB.cpp B.cpp
Undefined reference to B.foo()
collect2: error: ld returned 1 exit status

Any help/ideas are greatly appreciated. Mr. ld kept me up most of the night, and is threatening my sanity.

Edit

Thank you Mike Seymour! This minimal example was not a true rendition of the real code, as indeed a qualifier was missing in the implementation, and was the wrench in the gear.

share|improve this question
1  
besides dots (no pun intended), I see nothing wrong with your code. – BЈовић Nov 5 '13 at 13:10
1  
the 2nd attempt shows Undefined reference to B.foo(), meaning you didn't implement the foo static function – BЈовић Nov 5 '13 at 13:12
2  
The first attempt won't work, since it's not linking with the file that defines the member functions of B. The second works for me, once I fix all the compile errors in the posted code. Perhaps you could post example code that does compile, and does reproduce the error. – Mike Seymour Nov 5 '13 at 13:14
1  
Also, is that the exact error message? If I remove the definition of foo, then my version of GCC says "undefined reference to `B::foo()'" – Mike Seymour Nov 5 '13 at 13:16
1  
@AlmostSurely: It would be nice if you published at least the line containing fooinvocation. – Ad N Nov 5 '13 at 13:22
up vote 1 down vote accepted

In your real code, ParsedData::parsedStream is a template, and so should be defined in a header so that it's available in every translation unit that might need to instantiate it.

Also, you don't define it even in the .cpp file, since you left off the ParsedData:: qualifier and instead declared a different template at namespace scope.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you!! I spent hours debugging and that oversight was holding me back! – AlmostSurely Nov 5 '13 at 15:01

I suggest you compile and link in two distinct passes:

g++ -c -std=c++11 -o B.o B.cpp
g++ -c -std=c++11 -o TestB.o TestB.cpp
g++ -o test.exe B.o TestB.o

If what I suggest breaks it will at least be clear what is missing where and you will be able to debug individual object files with nm.

share|improve this answer
  $ g++ -std=c++11 testB.cpp   
  Undefined references to B(), and ~B()

This one is obviously wrong (I just say that because I do not see why you are making this attempt). You compile only one translation unit, that uses symbols defined in another (B.cpp) that is not compiled.

I think you should publish the actual content behind the ...in testB.cpp to help find the problem. It could be in your usage of foo()

By anticipation : since foois a static member method of your class, your invocation in the test should look like :

B::foo();
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.