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We have 3 different libraries, each developed by a different developer, and each was (presumably) well designed. But since some of the libraries are using RAII and some don't, and some of the libraries are loaded dynamically, and the others aren't - it doesn't work.

Each of the developers is saying that what he is doing is right, and making a methodology change just for this case (e.g. creating a RAII singleton in B) would solve the problem, but will look just as an ugly patch.

How would you recommend to solve this problem?

Please see the code to understand the problem:


My code:

static A* Singleton::GetA()
{
    static A* pA = NULL;
    if (pA == NULL)
    {
        pA = CreateA();
    }
    return pA;
}

Singleton::~Singleton()  // <-- static object's destructor, 
                         // executed at the unloading of My Dll.
{
     if (pA != NULL)
     {
         DestroyA();
         pA = NULL;
     }
}

"A" code (in another Dll, linked statically to my Dll) :

A* CreateA()
{
    // Load B Dll library dynamically
    // do all other initializations and return A*
}
void DestroyA()
{
    DestroyB();
}

"B" code (in another Dll, loaded dynamically from A) :

static SomeIfc* pSomeIfc;
void DestroyB()
{
    if (pSomeIfc != NULL)
    {
        delete pSomeIfc;  // <-- crashes because the Dll B was unloaded already,
                          // since it was loaded dynamically, so it is unloaded
                          // before the static Dlls are unloaded.
        pSomeIfc = NULL;
    }
}
share|improve this question
1  
It's unclear to me what is causing the premature unload of the "B" DLL, could you clarify? Offhand the solution seems to be modifying the point at which the B DLL is unloaded to match the scope of your A library's usage more appropriately. For instance if the DLL is loaded in CreateA, it should be unloaded in DestroyA. –  Dan Olson Dec 30 '09 at 8:01
3  
Creating a RAII wrapper is never an ugly hack. –  avakar Dec 30 '09 at 8:37

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

At first this looks like a problem of dueling APIs, but really it's just another static destructor problem.

Generally it's best to avoid doing anything nontrivial from a global or static destructor, for the reason you've discovered but also for other reasons.

In particular: On Windows, destructors for global and static objects in DLLs are called under special circumstances, and there are restrictions on what they may do.

If your DLL is linked with the C run-time library (CRT), the entry point provided by the CRT calls the constructors and destructors for global and static C++ objects. Therefore, these restrictions for DllMain also apply to constructors and destructors and any code that is called from them.

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms682583%28VS.85%29.aspx

The restrictions are explained on that page, but not very well. I would just try to avoid the issue, perhaps by mimicking A's API (with its explicit create and destroy functions) instead of using a singleton.

share|improve this answer
    
Exactly I have found that Singletons and dlls don't mix very well –  iain Dec 30 '09 at 17:03

My answer is the same as every time people go on about singletons: Don't effing do it!

Your singleton causes the destructors to be called too late, after some libraries have been unloaded. If you dropped the "static" and made it a regular object, instantiated in a tighter scope, it'd get destroyed before any libraries got unloaded, and everything should work again.

Just don't use singletons.

share|improve this answer
3  
i'm with you here, never needed to use singletons in my own code, ever. –  Matt Joiner Dec 30 '09 at 15:22
    
The entire point in RAII is to exploit the scoping rules to manage your resources. A singleton sidesteps that by ensuring that the resource is "always" there (until some implementation-defined event occurs, at least, such as a library being unloaded) –  jalf Dec 30 '09 at 16:11
1  
I usually don't like "don't do that" answers, but for C++ sometimes it's the only sane thing. +1. –  Jason Orendorff Dec 30 '09 at 16:13

First, in the example given, I fail to see how Singleton::~Singleton() has access to pA since you declared pA as a static local variable in Singleton::getA().

Then you explained that "B" library is loaded dynamically in A* Create();. Where is it unloaded then? Why doesn't unloading of "B" library happen in void DestroyA() before invoking DestroyB()?

And what do you call "linking a DLL statically"?

Finally, I don't want to be harsh but there are certainly better designs that putting singletons everywhere: in other words, do you really need the object that manages the lifetime of "A" to be a singleton anyway? You could invoke CreateA() at the beginning of your application and rely on atexit to make the DestroyA() call.

EDIT: Since you're relying on the OS to unload "B" library, why don't you remove DestroyB() call from DestroyA() implementation. Then make the DestroyB() call when "B" library unloads using RAII (or even OS specific mechanisms like calling it from DllMain under Windows and marking it with __attribute__((destructor)) under Linux or Mac).

EDIT2: Apparently, from your comments, your program has a lot of singletons. If they are static singletons (known as Meyers singletons), and they depend on each other, then sooner or later, it's going to break. Controlling the order of destruction (hence the singleton lifetime) requires some work, see Alexandrescu's book or the link given by @Martin in the comments.


References (a bit related, worth reading)

Clean Code Talks - Global State and Singletons

Once Is Not Enough

Performant Singletons

Modern C++ Design, Implementing Singletons

share|improve this answer
    
do you really need the object that manages the lifetime of "A" to be a singleton anyway: Yes I do, because there are a lot more singletons in my Dll that do things in their destructors which require access to A. So I have to manage A by a singleton, which gets destructed after all the other singletons in the Dll are destructed. –  Igor Oks Dec 30 '09 at 11:47
1  
Then I would recommend reading Alexei Alexandrescu's Modern C++ Design book. It contains a chapter dedicated to the perils of implementing singletons. The singleton is the most hated design pattern, I wish the GOF didn't introduce it. –  Gregory Pakosz Dec 30 '09 at 11:57
    
So your reason for using a singleton is "we have a lot of singletons"? A better solution then would be "get rid of all the singletons". What you're seeing is a side effect of the problems caused by singletons. –  jalf Dec 30 '09 at 12:38
    
I really wonder why this has been voted down... seriously... –  Gregory Pakosz Dec 30 '09 at 12:41
    
I disagree with your last edit (There is no control on the order of destruction). The order of destruction of singeltons is the inverse of the order of creation. If you have a dependency order between singeltons you can enforce it (though not automatically) it takes some work: stackoverflow.com/questions/335369/… Note: I do agree that Singelton is the most abused pattern out there. But this is really more of an education problem, "computer engineers" need to be explicitly taught usage (it is abused because it looks simple). –  Loki Astari Dec 30 '09 at 14:45

You are seeing the side effects of how atexit works in the MS C runtime.

This is the order:

  • Call atexit handlers for handlers defined in the executable and static libraries linked with the executable
  • Free all handles
  • Call atexit handlers for handlers defined in all dlls

So if you load the dll for B manually via a handle this handle will be freed and B will be unavailable in the destructor for A which is in a dll loaded automatically.

I have had similar problems cleaning up critical sections, sockets and db connections in singletons in the past.

The solution is to not use singletons or if you have to, clean them up before main exits. eg

int main(int argc, char * argv [])
{
    A* a = Singleton::GetA();

    // Do stuff;

   Singleton::cleanup();
   return 0;
}

Or even better to use RIIA to clean up after you

int main(int argc, char * argv [])
{
    Singleton::Autoclean singletoncleaner;  // cleans up singleton when it goes out of scope.

    A* a = Singleton::GetA();

    // Do stuff;

   Singleton::cleanup();
   return 0;
}

As a result of the problems with Singletons I try to avoid them completely esp since they make testing hell. If i require access to the same object everywhere and don't want to pass the reference around I construct it as an instance in main, the constructor then registers itself as the instance and you access it like a singleton everywhere else. The only place that has to know it is not a singleton is main.

Class FauxSingleton
{
public:
    FauxSingleton() {
        // Some construction
        if (theInstance == 0) {
            theInstance = this;
        } else {
            // could throw an exception here if it makes sense.
            // I generaly don't as I might use two instances in a unit test
        }
    }

    ~FauxSingleton() {
        if (theInstance == this) {
            theInstance = 0;
        }
    }

    static FauxSingleton * instance() {
        return theInstance;
    }

    static FauxSingleton * theInstance;
};


int main(int argc, char * argv [])
{
    FauxSingleton fauxSingleton;

    // Do stuff;
}

// Somewhere else in the application;
void foo() 
{
   FauxSingleton faux = FauxSingleton::instance();
   // Do stuff with faux;
}

Obviously the constructor and destructor are not thread safe but normally they are called in main before any threads are spawned. This is very useful in CORBA applications where you require an orb for the lifetime of the application and you also require access to it in lots of unrelated places.

share|improve this answer

The simple answer is don't write your own code that dynamically loads/unloads DLL.
Use a framework that handles all the details.

Once a DLL is loaded it is generally a BAD idea to unload it yourself manually.
There are so many gotchas (as you have found).
The simplest solution is to never to unload the DLL (once loaded). Let that OS do that as the application exits.

share|improve this answer
1  
B Dll is not unloaded manually. The singleton's (static object's) destructor is called when My Dll is unloaded. So this is the time when all Dlls are unloaded by the OS. Now, as far as I know, the Dlls are unloaded in the order opposite to the order of loading. So since Dll B was the last to be loaded (loaded dynamically), it will be unloaded first, before the unloading of My Dll and A Dll. –  Igor Oks Dec 30 '09 at 8:18
    
I think your description is an accurate description of how the DLL are loaded automatically by the OS on startup/shutdown, but I don't believe that's how it works when you do it manually. There is a specific call that increments a count each time a DLL is loaded. And another that decrements a count when a request is made to unload. When the count reaches 0 the DLL is unloaded. BUT (I believe (to make things difficult)): There are also other (lower level APIS) calls that can load/unload the DLL without incrementing/decrementing the count. –  Loki Astari Dec 30 '09 at 8:40

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