Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I've setup a linux machine (debian 6.0.7) with ldap authentication with the following configurations:

/etc/nsswitch.conf

passwd:         compat ldap [NOTFOUND=return UNAVAIL=continue] db
group:          compat ldap [NOTFOUND=return UNAVAIL=continue] db
shadow:         compat ldap

/etc/pam.d/common-account

# here are the per-package modules (the "Primary" block)
account [user_unknown=ignore authinfo_unavail=ignore default=ok]        pam_unix.so
account [success=ok user_unknown=ignore authinfo_unavail=ignore default=ignore] pam_succeed_if.so uid < 1000 debug
account [success=done default=ignore authinfo_unavail=1]     pam_ldap.so debug
# here's the fallback if no module succeeds
account requisite                       pam_deny.so
# prime the stack with a positive return value if there isn't one already;
# this avoids us returning an error just because nothing sets a success code
# since the modules above will each just jump around
account required                        pam_permit.so
# and here are more per-package modules (the "Additional" block)
# end of pam-auth-update config

/etc/pam.d/common-auth

# here are the per-package modules (the "Primary" block)
auth    [success=done default=ignore]      pam_unix.so nullok_secure
auth    requisite       pam_succeed_if.so uid >= 1000 quiet
auth    requisite       pam_succeed_if.so gid >= 1000 quiet
auth    requisite       pam_succeed_if.so user notingroup root
auth    requisite       pam_succeed_if.so user notingroup wheel
auth    [success=3 default=2 authinfo_unavail=ignore]      pam_ldap.so use_first_pass
auth    [success=2 default=ignore]      pam_ccreds.so minimum_uid=1000 action=validate use_first_pass
auth    [default=ignore]                pam_ccreds.so minimum_uid=1000 action=update
# here's the fallback if no module succeeds
auth    requisite                       pam_deny.so
# prime the stack with a positive return value if there isn't one already;
# this avoids us returning an error just because nothing sets a success code
# since the modules above will each just jump around
auth    required                        pam_permit.so
# and here are more per-package modules (the "Additional" block)
auth    optional                        pam_ccreds.so minimum_uid=1000 action=store
# end of pam-auth-update config

/etc/pam.d/common-password

# here are the per-package modules (the "Primary" block)
password        [success=2 default=ignore]      pam_unix.so obscure sha512
password        [success=1 user_unknown=ignore default=die authinfo_unavail=ignore]     pam_ldap.so try_first_pass
# here's the fallback if no module succeeds
password        requisite                       pam_deny.so
# prime the stack with a positive return value if there isn't one already;
# this avoids us returning an error just because nothing sets a success code
# since the modules above will each just jump around
password        required                        pam_permit.so
# and here are more per-package modules (the "Additional" block)
password        optional        pam_gnome_keyring.so
# end of pam-auth-update config

/etc/pam.d/common-session

# here are the per-package modules (the "Primary" block)
session [default=1]                     pam_permit.so
# here's the fallback if no module succeeds
session requisite                       pam_deny.so
# prime the stack with a positive return value if there isn't one already;
# this avoids us returning an error just because nothing sets a success code
# since the modules above will each just jump around
session required                        pam_permit.so
# and here are more per-package modules (the "Additional" block)
session required        pam_unix.so
session required        pam_mkhomedir.so skel=/etc/skel umask=0022
session optional        pam_ldap.so
# end of pam-auth-update config

in common-account I had to jump to pam_permit if ldap server is unavailable otherwise users with cached credentials can't authenticate, but I think this is not a good idea.

I'm also running nss_updatedb ldap to cache passwd and groups.

Everything is working fine, even offline authentication. The problem is when I disable a user on ldap (setting shadowexpire to 1). When the machine is online authentication system notify that the account is disabled but when the machine is offline a disabled user can login using cached credentials. I believe it's because shadow infos aren't cached.

Is it a way to cache shadow informations about disabled users so they can't log in even when the machine is offline?

share|improve this question
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.