Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I put Thread.sleep(100) in my Play 2.2 Controller to mimic a back-end operation.

@BodyParser.Of(BodyParser.Json.class)
    public Promise<Result> d() {    
        Promise<JsonNode> promiseOfJson = Promise.promise(new Function0<JsonNode>() {
            public JsonNode apply() throws Exception {
                ABean aBean = new ABean();

                aBean.setStatus("success");
                aBean.setMessage("Hello World...");

                Thread.sleep(100);

                return Json.toJson(aBean);
            }
        });

        return promiseOfJson.map(new Function<JsonNode, Result>() {
            public Result apply(JsonNode jsonNode) {
                return ok(jsonNode);
            }
        });
    }

I have my application.conf configured as

#Play Internal Thread Pool
    internal-threadpool-size=4

    #Scala Iteratee thread pool
    iteratee-threadpool-size=4

    # Akka Configuration for making parallelism
    # ~~~~~
    # Play's Default Thread Pool
    play {
        akka {
        akka.loggers = ["akka.event.Logging$DefaultLogger", "akka.event.slf4j.Slf4jLogger"]
        loglevel = ERROR
        actor {

            deployment {

                /actions {
                    router = round-robin
                    nr-of-instances = 100
                }

                /promises {
                    router = round-robin
                    nr-of-instances = 100
                }

            }

            retrieveBodyParserTimeout = 5 seconds

            actions-dispatcher = {
                fork-join-executor {
                    parallelism-factor = 100
                    parallelism-max = 100
                }
            } 

            promises-dispatcher = {
                fork-join-executor {
                    parallelism-factor = 100
                    parallelism-max = 100
                }
            }

            default-dispatcher = {
                fork-join-executor {

    #             No. of minimum threads = 8 ; at the most 64 ; or other wise 3 times the no. of processors available on the system 
    #             parallelism-factor = 1.0   
    #             parallelism-max = 64
    #             parallelism-min = 8

                  parallelism-factor = 3.0   
                  parallelism-max = 64
                  parallelism-min = 8

                }     
            }      
        }
      }
    }  

I ran ab command as follows:

ab -n 900 -c 1 http://localhost:9000/a/b/c/d

The result shows only 9 requests being handled per second.

Can application.conf be tweaked for better performance ? If yes , how ?

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

That is caused by the sleep(100) call. Even if all the rest of your code was infinitely fast, you would still only get 10 requests/second with only 1 test thread.

share|improve this answer
    
I am new to play framework. If I understand correctly , context switching should happen to share the workload( Here workload is sleep(100) ) among 100 threads ( parallelism-max set to 100) and thus expect a better request handling score per second . Am I correct or some configurations need to be changed ? –  user801573 Nov 5 '13 at 14:42
    
Running ab with -c 1 means that there will only be 1 thread sending requests. And that it will not send the next request, until the previous request is finished. So your server might be multi threaded but your benchmark software still only send 1 request at a time. So try -c 100 if that is what you want. –  MTilsted Nov 5 '13 at 15:18
    
Changed ab comand as ab -n 900 -c 100 localhost:9000/a/b/c/d. Found play lagging behind spring application. Time taken for request by Play was 8.362 sec as compared to Spring 1.159 sec.Requests per second for play stood at 107.63 versus 776.49 for spring. My play is handling requests badly. –  user801573 Nov 5 '13 at 18:03
    
There is a huge latency of order of few milliseconds when the application talks to back-end systems. Further, that back-end system is not yet ready. Hence the latency of 100 ms in the application. –  user801573 Nov 6 '13 at 5:54

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.