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I have the following code, which will read in files in ISO-8859-1, as thats what is required in this application,

private static String readFile(String filename) throws IOException {




String lineSep = System.getProperty("line.separator");
File f = new File(filename);
StringBuffer sb = new StringBuffer();
if (f.exists()) {
 BufferedReader br =
 new BufferedReader(
   new InputStreamReader(
              new FileInputStream(filename), "ISO-8859-1"));

 String nextLine = "";
 while ((nextLine = br.readLine()) != null) {
   sb.append(nextLine+ " ");
   // note:  BufferedReader strips the EOL character.
  // sb.append(lineSep);
 }
  br.close();
}

return sb.toString();
}

The problem is it is pretty slow. I have this function, which is MUCH faster, but I can not seem to find how to place the character encoding:

private static String fastStreamCopy(String filename)
{
   String s = "";
FileChannel fc = null;
try
{
    fc = new FileInputStream(filename).getChannel();



    MappedByteBuffer byteBuffer = fc.map(FileChannel.MapMode.READ_ONLY, 0, fc.size());

    int size = byteBuffer.capacity();
    if (size > 0)
        {

            byteBuffer.clear();
            byte[] bytes = new byte[size];
            byteBuffer.get(bytes, 0, bytes.length);
            s = new String(bytes);
        }

        fc.close();
    }
    catch (FileNotFoundException fnfx)
    {

        System.out.println("File not found: " + fnfx);
    }
    catch (IOException iox)
{

    System.out.println("I/O problems: " + iox);
   }
finally
    {
    if (fc != null)
        {
        try
            {
            fc.close();
            }
        catch (IOException ignore)
        {

        }
    }
    }
   return s;
}

Any one have an idea of where i should be putting the ISO encoding?

share|improve this question
    
Why are you talking about "stream copy" in your title and method name? There's only one stream involved. –  Joachim Sauer Nov 5 '13 at 14:58
    
Since you appear to just be reading all the lines, why not use the java.nio.file.Files class method readAllLines(Path path, Charset cs)? –  Jere Nov 5 '13 at 15:57
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2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

From the code you posted, you're not trying to "copy" the stream, but read it into a string.

You can simply provide the encoding in the String constructor:

s = new String(bytes, "ISO-88591-1");

Personally I'd just replace the whole method with a call to the Guava method Files.toString():

String content = Files.toString(new File(filename), StandardCharsets.ISO_8859_1);

If you're using Java 6 or earlier, you'll need to use the Guava field Charsets.ISO_8859_1 instead of StandardCharsets.ISO_8859_1 (which was only introduced in Java 7).

However your use of the term "copy" suggests that you want to write the result to some other file (or stream). If that is true, then you don't need to care about the encoding at all, since you can just handle the byte[] directly and avoid the (unnecessary) conversion to and from String.

share|improve this answer
    
interesting. Ive never used the Guava libraries. is it notable faster than the standard java.io.* libraries? –  recursive9 Nov 5 '13 at 14:45
1  
@recursive9: no, it's probably not noticable faster, but I assume it will be among the fastest ways you can do that task. To be honest: how you use an API probably has a lot more impact on performance (when it comes to I/O) than which API you use. For example in your first code above you read the file line-for-line for no apparent reason. This means that a.) there will be more method calls and b.) that you add the task of finding line separators and creating separate String objects for each line. Try to modified the code above to simply read as much characters as possible each time ... –  Joachim Sauer Nov 5 '13 at 14:49
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where you are converting bytes to string e.g. s = new String(bytes, encoding); or vice versa.

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