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I have started playing with codility and came across this problem:

A zero-indexed array A consisting of N different integers is given. The array contains integers in the range [1..(N + 1)], which means that exactly one element is missing.

Your goal is to find that missing element.

Write a function:

int solution(int A[], int N); 

that, given a zero-indexed array A, returns the value of the missing element.

For example, given array A such that:

A[0] = 2 A[1] = 3 A[2] = 1 A[3] = 5

the function should return 4, as it is the missing element.

Assume that:

    N is an integer within the range [0..100,000];
    the elements of A are all distinct;
    each element of array A is an integer within the range [1..(N + 1)].

Complexity:

    expected worst-case time complexity is O(N);
    expected worst-case space complexity is O(1), beyond input storage (not counting the storage required for input arguments).

I have submitted the following solution (in PHP):

function solution($A) {
    $nr = count($A);
    $totalSum = (($nr+1)*($nr+2))/2;
    $arrSum = array_sum($A);
    return ($totalSum-$arrSum);
}

which gave me a score of 66 of 100, because it was failing the test involving large arrays: "large_range range sequence, length = ~100,000" with the result: RUNTIME ERROR tested program terminated unexpectedly stdout: Invalid result type, int expected.

I tested locally with an array of 100.000 elements, and it worked without any problems. So, what seems to be the problem with my code and what kind of test cases did codility use to return "Invalid result type, int expected"?

share|improve this question
    
It is also not just an issue of the number of elements, but also the maximum value a data type can hold. If you multiply two large ints, the result might not fit in a int. That is the issue you are hittin IMO – shaktimaan Nov 6 '13 at 7:16
2  
@warunsl You are right. After doing some more research, php int type is dependent on the system used (can hold values up to 2147483647 on 32 bit systems and 9223372036854775807 on 64 bit systems). Whatever exced this limit will be auto converted to float. I was testing on a 64 bit system, and that's why ($nr+1)*($nr+2) didn't reach that limit, but on codility it was tranformed to float, making all the other operations return float type. The solution was to add the type casting on return (int)($totalSum-$arrSum). – user2956907 Nov 6 '13 at 13:22

27 Answers 27

up vote 2 down vote accepted

It looks like you are hitting the maximum value a PHP variable can hold when you are performing the multiplication. I am not sure if PHP allows you to work with bits, but this problem can be solved easily using something similar to Java's BitSet class.

The gist of the solution is, since we know that the numbers will be between 1 and n, set those bits to 1 in a variable whose indices are the elements of the input array. Now have another variable which has all the bits set in positions, 1 through and including n. Doing an XOR of these variables will give you the position of the missing number.

Here is a java code that implements the above logic (also a 100/100 on Codility)

public int solution(int[] A) {
    long result = 0L;

    BitSet all_elements = new BitSet();
    BitSet given_elements = new BitSet();

    for (int i = 0; i < A.length; i++) {
        given_elements.set((int) A[i]);
    }

    for (int i = 1; i <= A.length + 1; i++) {
        all_elements.set(i);
    }

    all_elements.xor(given_elements);

    for (int i = 0; i < all_elements.length(); ++i) {
        if(all_elements.get(i)) {
            result = i;
            break;
        }
    }

    return (int)result;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Theoretically, both solutions (yours and OP's) are O(n) on average, but OP's will be much faster in practice. The only thing that OP failed to do is to explicity cast the result to int. Also, result variable does not need to be long in your example. And finally, why xor? After creating a bitset of given elements, you simply need to find the index of the first gap. – Groo Dec 17 '13 at 15:21
1  
This solves the overflow problem but this solution is not correct, even though you'll get a 100% score, since space complexity is always O(n) and not O(1) in the worst-case. Check Alexander Missa's solution. stackoverflow.com/a/21798385/1722236 – otonglet May 28 '14 at 6:01

A 100/100 php solution for PermMissingElem:

function solution($A) {   
    $N   = count($A);
    $sum = ($N + 2) * ($N + 1) / 2;
    for($i = 0; $i < $N; $i++){
        $sum -= $A[$i];
    }
    return intval($sum);
}
share|improve this answer
    
I used array_sum($A) and I guess I hit the limit that the OP described too. using -= instead seemingly avoids it. – Cups Mar 8 '14 at 10:39
    
I used array_sum($A) and I have performance 100% – dontHaveName Feb 1 '15 at 10:36

Others have already answered the original question, but I thought to provide some more insight into the problem and share an alternative solution in C++ that is fast.

The solution, of course, is based on the old arithmetic trick to add up a large set of contiguous numbers, famously attributed to Carl Friedrich Gauss who discovered it when he was a young boy.

The OP ran into a problem with integer overflow due to the multiplication exceeding 32-bit precision for N>65,536. Here's a little trick to avoid that for the given range of N = [0..100,000]. When computing the sum of all ints (Gauss sum) for the numbers in [1..N+1] we subtract an offset of (N+2)/2 to make it a zero-sum (or at most "offset" in case N is odd). Similarly we also subtract this offset from all the values in the array. This way we shift the range of numbers to be added to at most [-50,000...+50,000]. In the worst case, i.e. if all positive (or negative) range numbers are in sequence, the largest intermediate sum never exceeds 31 bits, so no overflow will occur. For interleaved positive and negative numbers the intermediate sum will be even smaller.

After subtracting the array sum from the Gauss sum we again correct by adding back the offset to find the missing array element.

Here's the code in C++ (it scored 100% in the codility test):

int solution(vector<int> &A) {
    int N;
    int sum;
    int gauss;              // sum of all ints in [1..N+1] using Gauss' trick
    int offset;             // subtract offset from all numbers to make it a zero-sum
    int num_x;


    N = int(A.size());      // convert from size_t to int

    sum = 0;
    offset = (N+2) >> 1;        // make range symmetric between [-N/2..N/2] to avoid integer overflow in Gauss sum for large N

    // "gauss" should nominally be a zero sum, but if N is odd then N/2 is truncated 
    // and offset is off by 1/2 for each of the N elements. This formula compensates for that.
    gauss = (N & 1) * offset;

    for (int i = 0; i < N; i++) {
        sum += (A[i] - offset);     // this is the O(n) part of summing all elements in the array
    }

    num_x = gauss - sum + offset;   // find the missing number

    return num_x;
}
share|improve this answer

I am new to stackoverflow, tried to put in formatted way. Here is my answer in java with 100/100 score.......with O(n) complexity. If you would like, you can see it on following link.... http://codility.com/demo/results/demoJJERZ4-E7Z/

public int solution(int[] A) {
        int len = A.length;
    int result = 0;
         int[] B;
         B = new int[len+1];
         for(int i=0; i<= B.length-1; i++)
         {
            B[i] = i+1;
         }
              // int n = len +1;
                int i, sum1 = 0, sum2 = 0;
                for (i = 0; i <= A.length-1; i++) {
                        sum1 = sum1 + A[i];
                }
                for (i = 0; i <= B.length-1; i++) {
                        sum2 = sum2 + B[i];
                }
               result = sum2 - sum1;

                return result;
    }
share|improve this answer
    
As OP realized, the sum of a list of length N+1 with no missing elements is mathematically equivalent to (N+1)*(N+2)/2, which makes the part where you calculate the sum B unnecessary. And even if you wanted to do the calculation, you didn't have to create a new array for that, especially since the question asks for O(1) space complexity. – Groo Dec 17 '13 at 15:27

Consider this 100/100 solution in Ruby:

# Algorithm:
#
# * Compute theoretical sum based on array size.
# * Compute actual sum.
# * Subtract one from the other and you get the missing element.
def solution(ar)
  # Trivial case.
  return 1 if ar.empty?

  size = ar.size + 1
  full_sum = (size*(size + 1))/2
  actual_sum = ar.inject(:+)

  # Result.
  full_sum - actual_sum
end

#--------------------------------------- Tests

def test
  sets = []
  sets << ["empty", 1, []]
  sets << ["12", 3, [1, 2]]
  sets << ["13", 2, [1, 3]]
  sets << ["sample", 4, [2, 3, 1, 5]]

  sets.each do |name, expected, ar|
    out = solution(ar)
    raise "FAILURE at test #{name.inspect}: #{out.inspect} != #{expected.inspect}" if out != expected
  end

  puts "SUCCESS: All tests passed"
end
share|improve this answer

Code with PHP : I got (100%)

function solution($A) {

$arraySum=0;

$totalSum=0;

$res = 0;

for($i=0;$i<count($A);$i++)
{
    $arraySum += $A[$i];
    $totalSum += $i+1 ;
}
$totalSum += $i+1 ;
return abs((int)($totalSum - $arraySum)) ; 

}

share|improve this answer

100/100 solution in Python. Just 3 lines and easy to understand.

def solution(A):
    sum1 = sum(range(1,len(A)+2))
    sum2 = sum(A)
    return sum1-sum2

For large arrays the above solution is not efficient and some times might not work. The proposed improved solution will work for all corner cases. Please note in mind that we are iterating through the array only once in this case. So this solution is optimised for both space and time complexity.

def solution(A):
    size = 0
    array_sum = 0
    for item in A:
        size += 1
        array_sum += item
    expected_sum = (size+1)*(size+2)/2
    return expected_sum - array_sum
share|improve this answer

Please view my solution, my time complexity is O(N), and the time complexity is O(N), the score is 100.

int solution(int A[], int N) {
int * p = (int *)malloc((N + 1)*sizeof(int));
memset(p, 0, (N + 1)*sizeof(int));

int i;
int ret = 0;

for (i = 0; i < N; i++)
{
    A[i] = A[i] - 1;
}

for (i = 0; i < N; i++)
{
    p[A[i]] = 1;    
}

for (i = 0; i <= N; i++)
{
    if(p[i] == 0)
    {
        ret = i + 1;
        break;
    }
}

free(p);
return ret;

}

share|improve this answer

A 100/100 Objective C solution for PermMissingElem:

int solution(NSMutableArray *A) {

    unsigned long length = [A count] + 1;
    unsigned long sum1 = 0;
    unsigned long sum2 = 0;

    for (int i=0; i < [A count]; i++) {
        sum1 += [[A objectAtIndex:i] longValue];
    }

    sum2 = ((((length+1)*length)/2) - sum1);

    return sum2;

}
share|improve this answer

Another C solution for PermMissingElem (Scored 100/100 on Codility):

#include <math.h>
int solution(int A[], int N) {

double sum = (pow(N, 2) + 3 * N + 2) / 2;
int i;

for (i = 0; i < N; i++) {
    sum -= A[i];
}
return (int)sum;
}
share|improve this answer

First contribution ever (cross fingers to make it right!). My solution for C++ is the following:

int solution(int A[], int N)
{
    int sum = 0;
    for(int i=0; i<N; i++)
    {
        sum+= (i+1) - A[i];
    }
    sum+=(N+1);

    return(sum);
}

No need to include other libraries ;-). Hope it helps everybody!

share|improve this answer
    
actually, you can simply write "return sum + N + 1;" instead of the last two lines; also, you can skip the parentheses, both curly and round in the for loop here. additionally, since you add 1 to sum exactly N times AND you can iterate backwards to simplify the for loop AND you add all values of i from 0 to N-1, you can express this as: – vaxquis May 26 '14 at 17:07
    
int solution(int A[], int N) { int sum = 2 * N + 1, i; for(i = N - 1; i >= 0; i--) sum += (i-A[i]); return sum; } - note that separating (N-1)*N/2 makes it fail the large range tests due to overflows here, with possible fix of using a floating precision or long int here. – vaxquis May 26 '14 at 17:39

Here's my solution. It basically loops over the array setting respective elements to zero. Once the array's been processed the index of non-zero element indicates the missing value.

void f( vector<int> &A, int i )
{
    if( i != A.size()+1 &&  i != 0 )
    {
        int j = A[i-1];
        A[i-1] = 0;
        f(A, j);
    }
}

int solution(vector<int> &A) 
{   
    for ( int i = 0; i < A.size(); i++)
    {
        f(A, A[i]);
    }
    for( int i = 0; i < A.size(); i++)
   {
       if(A[i] != 0)
        return i+1;
   } 
   return A.size()+1;
}
share|improve this answer

100% Score : For Perm Missing Codility

function solution($A){
    return intval(intval(((count($A)+1) * ((count($A)+1) + 1)) / 2) - intval(array_sum($A)));
}
share|improve this answer

though I got 80 only :(...but it worked

int solution(int A[], int N) {

    int ret, nsum, i, sum = 0;

    nsum=(N * (N + 1)) / 2;

    for(i = 0; i < N; i++){
       sum = sum + A[i];
    }
    sum = (sum - (N + 1));
    ret = sum - nsum;
    return ret;
}
share|improve this answer
    
because nsum must be: nsum = (N+1) * (N+2) / 2. There are numbers from 1 to N+1 in task. – vladon Nov 7 '15 at 22:56

This simple solution scores 100%:

int solution(int A[], int N) {
  // write your code in C90
  double sum = N/2.;
  int i;
  double sumA=0;
  for(i=0; i<N; ++i) {
    sumA += A[i] - N/2.;
  }
  sumA -= N+1;
  return sum - sumA;
}
share|improve this answer

Wow, some really good answers here...

My initial 100% for JavaScript was not O(1) space complexity as required by the test :

var ll = A.length, lookup = {};

for (i=0; i<ll; i++)
   lookup[A[i]] = true;

for (i=0; i<ll; i++)
   if (!lookup[i+1]) return i+1;

After coming here and seeing the excellent posts, I chose the code by Daniel Caballero, simplified by vaxquis to convert to Javascript and paste here for future enjoyment :

var N = A.length, sum = 2*N + 1, i; 

for (i = N-1; i >= 0; i--) 
   sum += (i-A[i]); 

return sum; 
share|improve this answer

short C++ answer, test score 100%

#include<numeric>

int solution(vector<int> &A) {

    // compute sum of all elements, needs <numeric>
    long long sum = std::accumulate(A.begin(), A.end(), 0);

    // number of elements as 64-bit int to avoid overflow for large arrays
    long long N =  static_cast<long long>(A.size());

    // missing element is sum of elems 1 to N+1 minus sum, cast to int
    return static_cast<int>( ((N+1)*(N+2))/2 - sum );
}
share|improve this answer
function solution($A) {
    $sum = array_sum($A);
    $sum2 = 0;
    for ($i = 1; $i <= count($A)+1; $i++) {
        $sum2 += $i;
    }
    return $sum2-$sum;
}

php 100/100 solution

share|improve this answer

My 100/100 solution in O(N) or O(N * log(N)) PHP

function solution($A) {

    $right = 0;

    $count = count($A);

    $left = 0;


    for ($i = 0; $i < $count; $i++) {
        $right += $A[$i];
        $left += ($i + 1);
    }

    $left += $count;
    return (int)(abs(($right - $left))+1);

}
share|improve this answer

Little bit shorter 1 Line PHP solution 100/100 PermMissingElem:

function solution($a) {
    return array_sum(range(1, count($a)+1)) - array_sum($a);
}
share|improve this answer

My PHP solution for this problem : 100/100 score

function solution($a) {   
$c   = count($a); // counting the elements
$sum = ($c + 2) * ($c + 1) / 2; // getting the elements sum
$s = array_sum($A); // taking the sum of actual array elements
return intval($sum - $s ); //returning the difference
}//end of solution

Best regards, Hope this helps

share|improve this answer

100/100 in PHP and a much more readable implementation of the nth triangle number

function solution($a)
{
   $array_count = count($a) + 1;
   $sum = (($array_count + 1) * $array_count) / 2;
   $result = $sum - array_sum($a);
   return $result;
}
share|improve this answer
int solution(int []A){
    //missing number is sum of all possible entries ([1..N+1]) minus
    //sum of all items in A that are with the constrain [1..N+1] 
    int N = A.length;
    long sum = 0L;
    for(int i=1;i<=N+1;i++){
        sum += i;
    }

    long sumPossible= 0L;
    for(int i=0; i<N;i++){
        int x = A[i];
        boolean outOfRange = x<1 || x>N+1;
        if(!outOfRange) {
            sumPossible += x;
        }
    }
    return (int)(sum-sumPossible);
}
share|improve this answer

C++ one-line 100/100 solution:

#include <algorithm>
#include <functional>

int solution(vector<int> &A) {
    return std::accumulate(A.begin(), A.end(), (A.size()+1) * (A.size()+2) / 2, std::minus<int>());
}
share|improve this answer

Sigh, I got to admit this is fun... sum of N+1 integers = (N+1)(N+2)/2 = N [(N+2)/2] + (N+2)/2 = N * factor + factor, where factor = (N+2)/2.

score 100/100 Detected time complexity: O(N) or O(N * log(N))

int solution(int A[], int N) {    
    int factor = N+2;
    int total = factor;             
    for (int i=0;i<N;i++){        
        total += (factor - (A[i]<<1));                
    }    
    return (total>>1)+(total&1);
}
share|improve this answer

This is my PHP solution:

function solution($A) {   
    $n = count($A) + 1;
    return (($n * ($n + 1)) / 2) - (array_sum($A));
}
share|improve this answer
public static int solution(int[] A)
    {
        int Min = A.Min();
        int Max = A.Max();
        for (int i = Min; i < Max; i++)
        {
            if (A.Where(t => t == Min+i).ToArray().Length == 0)
            {
                return Min+i;
            }

        }
        return Min-1;
    }
share|improve this answer

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