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I want to write a class to check sets using exactly the behavior that unittest.TestCase.assertEqual exhibits for testing set equality. It automatically prints a nice message saying which elements are only in the first set and which are only in the second set.

I realize I could implement similar behavior, but since it's already done nicely with unittest.TestCase.assertEqual, I'd prefer to just utilize that (so please no answers that say the unhelpful and already obvious (but not applicable in this case) advice "don't solve this with unittest.TestCase")

Here is my code for the SetChecker class:

import unittest
class SetChecker(unittest.TestCase):
    """
    SetChecker(set1, set2) creates a set checker from the two passed Python set
    objects. Printing the SetChecker uses unittest.TestCase.assertEqual to test
    if the sets are equal and automatically reveal the elements that are in one
    set but not the other if they are unequal. This provides an efficient way
    to detect differences in possibly large set objects. Note that this is not
    a unittest object, just a wrapper to gain access to the helpful behavior of
    unittest.TestCase.assertEqual when used on sets.
    """
    EQUAL_MSG = "The two sets are equivalent."

    def __init__(self, set1, set2, *args, **kwargs):
        assert isinstance(set1, set)
        assert isinstance(set2, set)
        super(self.__class__, self).__init__(*args, **kwargs)
        try:
            self.assertEqual(set1, set2)
            self._str = self.EQUAL_MSG
            self._str_lines = [self._str]
            self._indxs = None
        except AssertionError, e:
            self._str = str(e)
            self._str_lines = self._str.split('\n')

            # Find the locations where a line starts with 'Items '.
            # This is the fixed behavior of unittest.TestCase.
            self._indxs = [i for i,y in enumerate(self._str_lines) 
                           if y.startswith('Items ')]

    def __repr__(self):
        """
        Convert SetChecker object into a string to be printed.
        """
        return self._str

    __str__ = __repr__ # Ensure that `print` and __repr__ do the same thing.

    def runTest(self):
        """
        Required by any sub-class of unittest.TestCase. Solely used to inherit
        from TestCase and is not implemented for any behavior.
        """
        pass

    def in_first_set_only(self):
        """
        Return a list of the items reported to exist only in the first set. If
        the sets are equivalent, returns a string saying so.
        """
        return (set(self._str_lines[1:self._indxs[1]]) 
                if self._indxs is not None else self.EQUAL_MSG)

    def in_second_set_only(self):
        """
        Return a list of the items reported to exist only in the second set. If
        the sets are equivalent, returns a string saying so.
        """
        return (set(self._str_lines[1+self._indxs[1]:]) 
                if self._indxs is not None else self.EQUAL_MSG)

This works fine when I use it in IPython:

In [1]: from util.SetChecker import SetChecker

In [2]: sc = SetChecker(set([1,2,3, 'a']), set([2,3,4, 'b']))

In [3]: sc
Out[3]:
Items in the first set but not the second:
'a'
1
Items in the second set but not the first:
'b'
4

In [4]: print sc
Items in the first set but not the second:
'a'
1
Items in the second set but not the first:
'b'
4

In [5]: sc.in_first_set_only()
Out[5]: set(["'a'", '1'])

In [6]: sc.in_second_set_only()
Out[6]: set(["'b'", '4'])

But now I also want to write unit tests for this class. So I've made a TestSetChecker class. Here is that code:

from util.SetChecker import SetChecker
class TestSetChecker(unittest.TestCase):
    """
    Test class for providing efficient comparison and printing of
    the difference between to sets.
    """
    def setUp(self):
        """
        Create examples for testing.
        """
        self.set1 = set([1, 2, 3, 'a'])
        self.set2 = set([2, 3, 4, 'b'])
        self.set3 = set([1,2])
        self.set4 = set([1,2])
        self.bad_arg = [1,2]
        self.expected_first = set(['1', 'a'])
        self.expected_second = set(['4', 'b'])
        self.expected_equal_message = SetChecker.EQUAL_MSG
        self.expected_print_string = (
            "Items in the first set but not the second:\n'a'\n1\n"
            "Items in the second set but not the first:\n'b'\n4")

    def test_init(self):
        """
        Test constructor, assertions on args, and that instance is of proper
        type and has expected attrs.
        """
        s = SetChecker(self.set1, self.set2)
        self.assertIsInstance(s, SetChecker)
        self.assertTrue(hasattr(s, "_str")) 
        self.assertTrue(hasattr(s, "_str_lines"))
        self.assertTrue(hasattr(s, "_indxs"))
        self.assertEqual(s.__repr__, s.__str__)
        self.assertRaises(AssertionError, s, *(self.bad_arg, self.set1))

    def test_repr(self):
        """
        Test that self-printing is correct.
        """
        s1 = SetChecker(self.set1, self.set2)
        s2 = SetChecker(self.set3, self.set4)
        self.assertEqual(str(s1), self.expected_print_string)
        self.assertEqual(str(s2), self.expected_equal_message)

    def test_print(self):
        """
        Test that calling `print` on SetChecker is correct.
        """
        s1 = SetChecker(self.set1, self.set2)
        s2 = SetChecker(self.set3, self.set4)
        s1_print_output = s1.__str__()
        s2_print_output = s2.__str__()
        self.assertEqual(s1_print_output, self.expected_print_string)
        self.assertEqual(s2_print_output, self.expected_equal_message)

    def test_in_first_set_only(self):
        """
        Test that method gives list of set elements found only in first set.
        """
        s1 = SetChecker(self.set1, self.set2)
        s2 = SetChecker(self.set3, self.set4)
        fs1 = s1.in_first_set_only()
        fs2 = s2.in_first_set_only()
        self.assertEqual(fs1, self.expected_first)
        self.assertEqual(fs2, self.expected_equal_message)

    def test_in_second_set_only(self):
        """
        Test that method gives list of set elements found only in second set.
        """
        s1 = SetChecker(self.set1, self.set2)
        s2 = SetChecker(self.set3, self.set4)
        ss1 = s1.in_second_set_only()
        ss2 = s2.in_second_set_only()
        self.assertEqual(ss1, self.expected_second)
        self.assertEqual(ss2, self.expected_equal_message)        

if __name__ == "__main__":
    unittest.main()

As far as I can tell, TestSetChecker has no differences from the many other unit test classes that I write (apart from the specific functionality it is testing for).

Yet, I am seeing a very unusual __init__ error when I try to execute the file containing the unit tests:

EMS@computer ~/project_dir/test $ python TestSetChecker.py
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "TestSetChecker.py", line 84, in <module>
    unittest.main()
  File "/opt/python2.7/lib/python2.7/unittest/main.py", line 94, in __init__
    self.parseArgs(argv)
  File "/opt/python2.7/lib/python2.7/unittest/main.py", line 149, in parseArgs
    self.createTests()
  File "/opt/python2.7/lib/python2.7/unittest/main.py", line 155, in createTests
    self.test = self.testLoader.loadTestsFromModule(self.module)
  File "/opt/python2.7/lib/python2.7/unittest/loader.py", line 65, in loadTestsFromModule
    tests.append(self.loadTestsFromTestCase(obj))
  File "/opt/python2.7/lib/python2.7/unittest/loader.py", line 56, in loadTestsFromTestCase
    loaded_suite = self.suiteClass(map(testCaseClass, testCaseNames))
TypeError: __init__() takes at least 3 arguments (2 given)

The directory with the Python unittest source code is read-only in my environment, so I can't add pdb or even print statements there to see what testCaseClass or testCaseNames are at this point where some __init__ fails.

But I can't see any places in my code where I'm failing to provide needed arguments to any __init__ method. I'm wondering if this has something to do with some behind-the-scenes magic with classes that inherit from unittest and with the fact that I'm importing and instantiating a class (SetChecker) within the file that is to be executed for unit tests.

Maybe it checks for all classes in the existing namespace that inherit from TestCase? If so, how do you unit-test the unit tests?

I also tried to first make SetChecker inherit from object and tried to use TestCase like a mix-in, but that created lots of MRO errors and seemed more headache than it was worth.

I've tried searching for this but it's a difficult error to search for (since it does not appear to be a straightforward problem with __init__ arguments).

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1 Answer 1

I was able to work around this by making SetChecker inherit from object only, and then inside of SetChecker providing an internal class that inherits from unittest.TestCase.

The problem is that unittest.main inspects the whole namespace of the module it is run from. Any class it finds in that module that inherits from unittest.TestCase will get the full test-suite treatment (it will try to construct instances of the class for each test_ method it can find, or just for runTest if it finds no test_ methods).

In my case, since the set arguments are required, whatever it is that unittest.main is doing, it's passing some argument (probably the name of the function to treat as the test, in this case the string "runTest") but failing to pass the second required argument. Even if this worked with the signature of my class (e.g. suppose that I replaced the two distinct arguments set1 and set2 with a tuple of 2 sets), it would then immediately fail once it tried to do set operations with that string.

There doesn't appear to be an easy way to tell unittest.main to ignore a certain class or classes. So, by making SetChecker just an object that has a TestCase inside of it, unittest.main no longer finds that TestCase and no longer cares.

There was one other bug: in my test_init function, I use assertRaises which expects a callable, but had never given my SetChecker class a __call__ function.

Here's the modification to the SetChecker class that fixed this for me:

class SetChecker(object):
    """
    SetChecker(set1, set2) creates a set checker from the two passed Python set
    objects. Printing the SetChecker uses unittest.TestCase.assertEqual to test
    if the sets are equal and automatically reveal the elements that are in one
    set but not the other if they are unequal. This provides an efficient way
    to detect differences in possibly large set objects. Note that this is not
    a unittest object, just a wrapper to gain access to the helpful behavior of
    unittest.TestCase.assertEqual when used on sets.
    """
    EQUAL_MSG = "The two sets are equivalent."

    class InternalTest(unittest.TestCase):
        def runTest(self): pass

    def __init__(self, set1, set2):
        assert isinstance(set1, set)
        assert isinstance(set2, set)
        self.int_test = SetChecker.InternalTest()

        try:
            self.int_test.assertEqual(set1, set2)
            self._str = self.EQUAL_MSG
            self._str_lines = [self._str]
            self._indxs = None
        except AssertionError, e:
            self._str = str(e)
            self._str_lines = self._str.split('\n')

            # Find the locations where a line starts with 'Items '.
            # This is the fixed behavior of unittest.TestCase.
            self._indxs = [i for i,y in enumerate(self._str_lines) 
                           if y.startswith('Items ')]
    @classmethod
    def __call__(klass, *args, **kwargs):
        """
        Makes the class callable such that calling it like a function is the
        same as constructing a new instance.
        """
        return klass(*args, **kwargs)

    # Everything else below is the same...
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