Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a list of words that I need all possible of pairs of in a random order. But the constraint is that pair N cannot have either word from pair N-1. I've replaced words with numbers for ease of explanation here.

import itertools  
import random

a = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6]
c = list(itertools.permutations(a, 2))

random.shuffle(c)

for i in range(len(c)):
    if i == 0 or i > (len(c)-3): 
        continue
    else:
        if c[i][0] == c[i-1][0] or c[i][0] == c[i-1][1] or c[i][1] == c[i-1][0] or c[i][1] == c[i-1][1]:
            c.insert(i+10, c.pop(i))
        else:
            continue

I have come up with a very inelegant and incomplete solution. The problems I've encountered pursuing this method are: It only iterates through the list once. So if either number from c[i] matches c[i-1], c[i] gets popped further down the list, but the new c[i] doesn't get evaluated to check for the same issue. 2. If I make the for-loop part of a function, like below, I get basically infinite recursion.

def shuffler(a): 
    for i in range(a,len(c)):
        if i == 0 or i > (len(c)-3): 
            continue
        else:
            if c[i][0] == c[i-1][0] or c[i][0] == c[i-1][1] or c[i][1] == c[i-1][0] or c[i][1] == c[i-1][1]:
                c.insert(i+10, c.pop(i))
                shuffler(i)
            else:
                continue

Sorry - solution found:

import itertools  
import random

a = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6]
c = list(itertools.permutations(a, 2))

random.shuffle(c)



def checker():
    if c[i][0] == c[i-1][0] or c[i][0] == c[i-1][1] or c[i][1] == c[i-1][0] or c[i][1] == c[i-1][1]:
        c.insert(i+10, c.pop(i))
        checker()

for i in range(len(c)):
    if i == 0 or i > (len(c)-3): 
        continue
    else:
        checker()

print c 
share|improve this question
    
What exactly is your questions? –  Roman Nov 5 '13 at 16:50
    
I'm not even sure such a constraint is always (or often) possible -- certainly if your list had 3 or 4 words, you can confirm that you cannot iterate through all pairs so that each two consecutive pairs are disjoint. –  JLLagrange Nov 5 '13 at 17:01
    
In particular, in the code you added as a solution, the last two tuples may share an element -- it looks like some of the time, but not all of the time. I wonder if there is a general rule for when it is possible to generate such a list? –  JLLagrange Nov 5 '13 at 17:09

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.