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I have a string (say string 1) that needs to be matched to other string(string2) Both the strings will have same length and are case in-sensitive.

I want to print the number of character matches between both the strings.

Eg: String 1: stranger
    String 2: strangem

     Match count = 7

I tried this:

$string1 = "stranger";
$string2 = "strangem";
my $count = $string1 =~ m/string2/ig;

print "$count\n";

Any kind of help is appreciated. Thanks in advance!!

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2  
Do you want 0 or 2 for aabb and bbcc? –  ikegami Nov 5 '13 at 16:53
1  
and, if 0, do you want 1 or 2 for abc and azc? –  ysth Nov 5 '13 at 17:09
    
Hi Ikegami, it should be 0. –  I am Nov 5 '13 at 18:20
    
Hi ysth, it should be 2 –  I am Nov 5 '13 at 18:21

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Exclusive or, then count the nul characters (where the strings were the same):

my $string1 = "stranger";
my $string2 = "strangem";
my $count = ( lc $string1 ^ lc $string2 ) =~ tr/\0//;

print "$count\n";

Update: missed the "case in-sensitive" bit.

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Above code is working fine. Can you please provide what does "^" and tr/\0// represents? –  I am Nov 5 '13 at 18:29
1  
^ is the exclusive or operator, here used in its string mode. it will produce a string that has \0 wherever the two input strings had the same character. tr is the transliteration operator, here used just to count characters. –  ysth Nov 5 '13 at 19:21

You can use substr for that:

#!/usr/bin/perl
use warnings;
use strict;

my $string1=lc('stranger');
my $string2=lc('strangem');
my $count=0;
for (0..length($string1)-1) {
    $count++ if substr($string1,$_,1) eq substr($string2,$_,1);
}
print $count; #prints 7

Or you can use split to get all characters as an array, and loop:

#!/usr/bin/perl
use warnings;
use strict;

my $string1=lc('stranger');
my $string2=lc('strangem');
my $count=0;
my @chars1=split//,$string1; 
my @chars2=split//,$string2;
for (0..$#chars1) {
    $count++ if $chars1[$_] eq $chars2[$_];
}
print $count; #prints 7

(fc gives more accurate results than lc, but I went for backwards compatibility.)

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Not tested

sub cm
{
    my @a = shift;
    my @b = shift;

    # First match prefix of string:
    my $n = 0;
    while ($n < $#a && $n < $#b && $a[$n] eq $b[$n]) {
       ++$n;
    }
    # Then skip one char on either side, and recurse.
    if ($n < $#a && $n < $#b) {
       # Match rest by skipping one place:
       my $n2best = 0;
       my $n2a = cm(splice(@a, $n), splice(@b, $n + 1));
       $n2best = $n2a;
       my $n2b = cm(splice(@a, $n + 1), splice(@b, $n));
       $n2best = $n2b if $n2b > $n2best;
       my $n2c = cm(splice(@a, $n + 1), splice(@b, $n + 1));
       $n2best = $n2c if $n2c > $n2best;
       $n += $n2best;
    }
    return $n;
}

sub count_matches
{
    my $a = shift;
    my $b = shift;

    my @a_chars = split //, $a;
    my @b_chars = split //, $b;
    return cm(@a_chars, @b_chars); 
}

print count_matches('stranger', 'strangem')
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