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Let's assume that I already have had both of Child package and Parent package with several subroutines. These two packages are combined together through aggregation just like in perltoot:

use warnings;
use strict;

package Child;

sub new {
    my ($class, %arg) = @_;
    return bless { %arg }, $class;
}

sub method_x {
    warn 'call method x';
}

sub method_y {
    warn 'call method y';
}

sub method_z {
    warn 'call method z';
}

1;


package Parent;

sub new {
    my ($class, %arg) = @_;
    return bless {
        child => undef,
        %arg,
    }, $class;
}

sub child { shift->{child} }
sub x { shift->child->method_x(@_) }
sub y { shift->child->method_y(@_) }
sub z { shift->child->method_z(@_) }

sub _callback {
    warn "I want to kick this callback after every child methods.";
}

1;


package main;

my $p = Parent->new(
    child => Child->new,
);

$p->x;
$p->y;
$p->z;

1;

After a while, I wanted to kick _callback for every Child's methods and I stunned at I was trying to add this callback to every wrapper methods(x/y/z).

Can I do this job more elegantly? Did I have to allow more flexibility to the package at the start? How?

Any advice is appreciated.

share|improve this question
    
critical information is missing here; what is in _callback? is it a Parent method that needs access to the Parent object? does it need to know the Child object being used, the method being called, and/or the parameters passed? –  ysth Nov 5 '13 at 17:50
    
_callback is a Parent's method and its first parameter is a parent object. I want to keep Child as it is. No need to tell him being used. –  ernix Nov 5 '13 at 19:20

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

One possibility is to use method modifiers, which are provided by object systems like Moose or Moo:

use strict; use warnings;

package Child {
  use Moose;

  sub method_x { warn "call method_x" }
  sub method_y { warn "call method_y" }
  sub method_z { warn "call method_z" }
}

package Parent {
  use Moose;

  has child => (is => 'rw');

  sub x { shift->child->method_x(@_) }
  sub y { shift->child->method_y(@_) }
  sub z { shift->child->method_z(@_) }

  # A method modifier in action
  after [qw/ x y z /] => sub {
    warn "called after every Parent (!) invocation";
  };
}

my $p = Parent->new(child => Child->new);

$p->x; $p->y; $p->z;

Output:

call method_x at - line 7.
called after every Parent (!) invocation at - line 23.
call method_y at - line 8.
called after every Parent (!) invocation at - line 23.
call method_z at - line 9.
called after every Parent (!) invocation at - line 23.

If you actually wish to wrap all the methods of Child, use a subclass:

package WrappedChild {
  use Moose;
  extends 'Child';

  # the /(?=)/ regex matches always
  after qr/(?=)/ => sub {
    warn "called after each method in Child";
  };
}


my $p = Parent->new(child => WrappedChild->new);

$p->x; $p->y; $p->z;

This produces

called after each method in Child at - line 32.
called after each method in Child at - line 32.
called after each method in Child at - line 32.
called after each method in Child at - line 32.
called after each method in Child at - line 32.
called after each method in Child at - line 32.
call method_x at - line 7.
called after each method in Child at - line 32.
called after every Parent (!) invocation at - line 22.
call method_y at - line 8.
called after each method in Child at - line 32.
called after every Parent (!) invocation at - line 22.
call method_z at - line 9.
called after each method in Child at - line 32.
called after every Parent (!) invocation at - line 22.
called after each method in Child at - line 32.
called after each method in Child at - line 32.
called after each method in Child at - line 32.

which might be a bit excessive. Sticking to explicit names might be preferable.

See Moose::Manual::MethodModifiers for more info.


If you do not wish to use any modules, you can hack your way through the jungle symbol table:

for my $name (qw/method_x method_y method_z/) {
  no strict 'refs';
  no warnings 'redefine';
  my $orig = \&{"Child::$name"};
  *{"Child::$name} = sub {
    my @return_values = wantarray ? $orig->() : scalar $orig->();
    warn "called after each method";
    return wantarray ? @return_values : $return_values[0];
  };
}

Output:

call method_x at - line 7.
called after each method at - line 31.
call method_y at - line 8.
called after each method at - line 31.
call method_z at - line 9.
called after each method at - line 31.
share|improve this answer
2  
note that the symbol table approach triggers the callback for all uses of Child, not just those via parent. –  ysth Nov 5 '13 at 17:48
    
see the newest comment on the question for a game change –  ysth Nov 5 '13 at 19:29
1  
An easier way to do the delegated methods is to use Moose's handles option - gist.github.com/tobyink/7328339 –  tobyink Nov 5 '13 at 23:41
package Wrapper;

use strict;
use warnings;

use Carp qw( );

sub wrap {
   my ($cb, $o) = @_;
   return bless({
      o  => $o,
      cb => $cb,
   });
}

sub AUTOLOAD {
   my $self = shift;
   my $o  = $self->{o};
   my $cb = $self->{cb};

   my ($method) = our $AUTOLOAD =~ /^.*::(.*)\z/;
   my $sub = ;
   if (!$o->can($method) && !$o->can("AUTOLOAD")) {
      my $package = ref($o);
      Carp::croak("Can't locate object method \"$method\" via package \"$pkg\"");
   }

   if (wantarray) {
      my @rv = $object->$method(@_);
      $cb->($method, @_);
      return @rv;
   }
   elsif (defined(wantarray)) {
      my $rv = $object->$method(@_);
      $cb->($method, @_);
      return $rv;
   }
   else {
      $object->$method(@_);
      $cb->($method, @_);
      return;
   }
}

my $w = wrap(sub { warn "Returning from $_[0]\n" }, Child->new);
$w->x; $w->y; $w->z;
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