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my code is :

    int linenumber = File.ReadLines(path).Count();

but it takes long time (about 20 second) for files about 1 gig size .

so does anyone know better way to solve this problem ?

Update 6 :

I have tested your solutions :

for a file about 870 mb size :

method 1 : { my code time(seconds) : 13 }

method 2 : (from MarcinJuraszek & Locke) (the same) {

time(seconds) : 12 }

method 3 : (from Richard Deeming) { time(seconds) : 19 }

method 4 : (from user2942249) { time(seconds) : 13 }

method 5 : (from Locke) { time(seconds) : 13 is the same for lineBuffer = {4096 , 8192 , 16384 , 32768} }

method 6 : (from Locke edition 2) { time(seconds) : 9 for Buffer size = 32KB , time(seconds) : 10 for Buffer size = 64KB }

As i said , in my comment , there is an application (native code) , that opens this file in my pc in 5 second. therefore this is not about h.d.d speed.

By Compiling MSIL to Native Code , the difference was not obvious.

Conclusion : at this time , the Locke method 2 is faster than other method.

So i marked his post as Answer . but this post will be open if any one find better idea.

I gave +1 vote up for dear friends who help me to solve the problem.

Thanks for your help. interesting better idea . Best Regards Smart Man

share|improve this question
1  
You could just load the file one chunk at a time and add up the number of line break characters from each chunk. –  Gabe Nov 5 '13 at 17:15
7  
Depending on the speed of your hard drives, it might actually take that long to read a 1 gig file, in which case you are I/O bound, and no coding technique will improve the speed. –  Robert Harvey Nov 5 '13 at 17:15
2  
@RobertHarvey, fragmentation may even play a role in this as well. –  Michael Perrenoud Nov 5 '13 at 17:17
1  
@RobertHarvey: The OP is already using the solution in the one marked duplicate, and finds it insufficient because that question is looking for "easiest" way to count the line numbers and OP wants "fastest". Those questions have very different answers. –  Gabe Nov 5 '13 at 17:28
1  
@SmartMan: Just make sure you do your homework. You can't really expect others to write your application for you. –  Robert Harvey Nov 5 '13 at 18:07
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4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Here are a few ways this can be accomplished quickly:

StreamReader:

using (var sr = new StreamReader(path))
{
    while (!String.IsNullOrEmpty(sr.ReadLine()))
        lineCount ++;
}

FileStream:

var lineBuffer = new byte[65536]; // 64Kb
using (FileStream fs = new FileStream(path, FileMode.Open, FileAccess.Read,
       FileShare.Read, lineBuffer.Length))
{
    int readBuffer = 0;
    while ((readBuffer = fs.Read(lineBuffer, 0, lineBuffer.Length)) > 0)
    {
        for (int i = 0; i < readBuffer; i++)
        {
            if (lineBuffer[i] == 0xD) // Carriage return + line feed
                lineCount++;
        }
    }
}

Multithreading:

Arguably the number of threads shouldn't affect the read speed, but real world benchmarking can sometimes prove otherwise. Try different buffer sizes and see if you get any gains at all with your setup. *This method contains a race condition. Use with caution.

var tasks = new Task[Environment.ProcessorCount]; // 1 per core
var fileLock = new ReaderWriterLockSlim();
int bufferSize = 65536; // 64Kb

using (FileStream fs = new FileStream(path, FileMode.Open, FileAccess.Read,
        FileShare.Read, bufferSize, FileOptions.RandomAccess))
{
    for (int i = 0; i < tasks.Length; i++)
    {
        tasks[i] = Task.Factory.StartNew(() =>
            {
                int readBuffer = 0;
                var lineBuffer = new byte[bufferSize];

                while ((fileLock.TryEnterReadLock(10) && 
                       (readBuffer = fs.Read(lineBuffer, 0, lineBuffer.Length)) > 0))
                {
                    fileLock.ExitReadLock();
                    for (int n = 0; n < readBuffer; n++)
                        if (lineBuffer[n] == 0xD)
                            Interlocked.Increment(ref lineCount);
                }
            });
    }
    Task.WaitAll(tasks);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Have you tried FileShare.None instead of FileShare.Read? –  sloth Nov 6 '13 at 14:59
    
Just tested it, and I don't see a difference up or down in execution time, however that could change with a larger file. It's interesting though because I thought I needed FileShare.Read for threads to work on the same file together. –  Locke Nov 6 '13 at 15:02
    
FileStream isn't designed to be accessed from multiple threads simultaneously. Your multithreaded code won't necessarily work. –  Servy Nov 6 '13 at 18:07
    
@Servy, while I agree with you, it seems to be working on the small-scale tests so far. If you have some light you could shed on why the performance gains are happening I'm happy to listen. –  Locke Nov 6 '13 at 18:18
1  
@Locke The code has race conditions. That doesn't mean it never works, it means it will sometimes work and it sometimes won't work; you can never know anytime you run the program what you'll get. The performance characteristics are irrelevant if it doesn't work. A program that's 10x faster is still useless if it doesn't provide the correct answer. –  Servy Nov 6 '13 at 18:20
show 3 more comments

It is hardware dependent, one question is what is the best buffer size. Perhaps something equal to the disk sector size or greater. After experimenting myself, I've found it's usually best to let the system determine that. If speed really is a concern, you can drop down to the Win32 API ReadFile/CreateFile specifying various flags and parameters such as async IO and no buffering, sequential read, etc... which may or may not help improve performance. You'll have to profile and see what works best on your system. In .NET you may be able to pin the buffer for better performance, of course pinning memory in GC environment has other ramifications, but if you don't keep it around too long, etc...

    const int bufsize = 4096;
    int lineCount = 0;
    Byte[] buffer = new Byte[bufsize];
    using (System.IO.FileStream fs = new System.IO.FileStream(@"C:\\data\\log\\20111018.txt", FileMode.Open, FileAccess.Read, FileShare.None, bufsize))
    {
        int totalBytesRead = 0;
        int bytesRead;
        while ((bytesRead = fs.Read(buffer, 0, buffer.Length)) > 0) {
            int i = 0;
            while (i < bytesRead)
            {
                switch (buffer[i])
                {
                    case 10:
                        {
                            lineCount++;
                            i++;
                            break;
                        }
                    case 13:
                        {
                            int index = i + 1;
                            if (index < bytesRead)
                            {
                                if (buffer[index] == 10)
                                {
                                    lineCount++;
                                    i += 2;
                                }
                            }
                            else
                            {
                                i++;
                            }
                            break;
                        }
                    default:
                        {
                            i++;
                            break;
                        }
                }
            }
            totalBytesRead += bytesRead;
        }
        if ((totalBytesRead > 0) && (lineCount == 0))
            lineCount++;                    
    }
share|improve this answer
    
:thanks . i have tested your sulotion and edited my post –  Smart Man Nov 5 '13 at 19:34
add comment

As your tests showed, changes in code aren't going to have a significant affect on the speed. The bottleneck is in your disk reading the data, not the C# code processing it.

If you want to speed up the execution of this task buy a faster/better hard drive, either one with a higher RPM, or even a solid state drive. Alternatively you could consider using RAID0, which could potentially improve your disk read speeds.

Another option would be to have multiple hard drives, and to break up the file so that each drive stores one portion, you can then parallelize the work with one task handling the file on each drive. (Note that parallelizing the work when you only have one disk won't help anything, and is more likely to actually hurt.)

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks but as i said , there is a application , UltraEdit , that opens this file in my pc in 5 second. therefore this is not about h.d.d speed. –  Smart Man Nov 5 '13 at 20:28
1  
@SmartMan That doesn't mean it's actually loaded the entire contents of the file. It can rely on paging and differed execution to not load the entire file's contents into memory. –  Servy Nov 5 '13 at 20:31
    
sure, it uses min of memory. so how it opens and count total number of lines in just 5 second ? (my main question is about count line number only) –  Smart Man Nov 5 '13 at 20:34
    
Hmm, I had a response going into UltaEdit's file loading technique, but the line count total being present so quickly is interesting. –  Locke Nov 5 '13 at 20:36
    
Also, how did you measure the performance of this other application? If your timing mechanism is just you counting, being off by several seconds isn't impossible. It could also be caching information about the line numbers if you've loaded the file before. –  Servy Nov 5 '13 at 20:38
show 1 more comment

Assuming that building a string to represent each line is what's taking the time, something like this might help:

public static int CountLines1(string path)
{
   int lineCount = 0;
   bool skipNextLineBreak = false;
   bool startedLine = false;
   var buffer = new char[16384];
   int readChars;

   using (var stream = new FileStream(path, FileMode.Open, FileAccess.Read, FileShare.Read, buffer.Length))
   using (var reader = new StreamReader(stream, Encoding.UTF8, false, buffer.Length, false))
   {
      while ((readChars = reader.Read(buffer, 0, buffer.Length)) > 0)
      {
         for (int i = 0; i < readChars; i++)
         {
            switch (buffer[i])
            {
               case '\n':
               {
                  if (skipNextLineBreak)
                  {
                     skipNextLineBreak = false;
                  }
                  else
                  {
                     lineCount++;
                     startedLine = false;
                  }
                  break;
               }
               case '\r':
               {
                  lineCount++;
                  skipNextLineBreak = true;
                  startedLine = false;
                  break;
               }
               default:
               {
                  skipNextLineBreak = false;
                  startedLine = true;
                  break;
               }
            }
         }
      }
   }

   return startedLine ? lineCount + 1 : lineCount;
}

Edit 2:
It's true what they say about "assume"! The overhead of calling .Read() for each character outweighs the savings from not creating a string for each line. Even updating the code to read a block of characters at a time is still slower than the original method.

share|improve this answer
    
reader.Peek() is going to be a slowdown too. If you can do it without peeking it would be faster. Perhaps putting the read at the end of the method instead of the start (and not calling it in the case of 13 because it already did the read) –  Scott Chamberlain Nov 5 '13 at 18:16
    
@ScottChamberlain: StreamReader buffers the data as it reads it (at least in .NET 4.5), so Peek() followed by Read() shouldn't make any significant difference. –  Richard Deeming Nov 5 '13 at 18:18
    
Also note that he doesn't want to count blank lines; this doesn't account for that. –  Servy Nov 5 '13 at 18:53
    
@Servy: OK, I've updated the code to skip blank lines. –  Richard Deeming Nov 5 '13 at 19:01
    
@RichardDeeming : thanks . i have tested your sulotion and edited my post. –  Smart Man Nov 5 '13 at 19:33
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