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I want to create an array in Visual Studio as it is possible in C99:

int function(int N)
{
    int x[N];
    return 1;
};

But even VS2013 doesn't support this. Is there another way (except using new and delete) to create x without the need to fix N at translation time? Thank you very much!

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2  
No, the value of N must be known at compile-time. –  Der Flatulator Nov 5 '13 at 17:19
    
Wait for the C++14 TS. It's not standard C++. –  chris Nov 5 '13 at 17:19
    
@DerFlatulator: So I have to use new because VS20xx doesn't support C99 completely? –  arc_lupus Nov 5 '13 at 17:20
    
@arc_lupus Since C++ is not C, support of C99 has nothing to do with inability to declare variable-size arrays in C++. –  dasblinkenlight Nov 5 '13 at 17:22
    
It is not VS 20xx that doesn't support C99. It is the C++ Standard that doesn't support C99. –  Vlad from Moscow Nov 5 '13 at 17:23

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The condoned way of doing this in C++ is by using vectors

#include <vector>

int function(int N)
{
    std::vector<int> x(N);
    return 1;
};

If you know that N won't be enormous (and since you seem to want this memory on the stack, anyway), you can use _alloca, which is a C function. See the documentation here.

#include <malloc.h>

int function(int N)
{
    int *x = _alloca(sizeof(int)*N);
    return 1;
};

This isn't really recommended, and has been superceded by _malloca, which requires a call to _freea after you're done with the memory.

Note that both versions will free the memory when the function exits, but the first version will allocate memory on the heap, whereas the second will allocate on the stack (and therefore has a much stricter upper limit on N). Besides the convenience and low-overhead of the std::vector class, using C-style pointers in a C++ program is kind of a downer anyway. :)

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In order for an array in C++ to be defined on the stack (i.e. without new), the size of it must be known at compile time, such as a const int or a preprocessor macro. As this is not the case in this situation, you can use the following instead:

#include <vector>
using namespace std;
// ...
int function(int n)
{
    vector<int> x (n);
    return 1;
}
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There is no such a possibily to define a variable length array in the stack in C++. But you can use std::vector instead though it allocates memory in the heap.

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