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I am trying to understand how caching works. I am working on a problem to better understand this concept:

Given a 2 way set associative cache with blocks 1 word in length, with the total size being 16 words of length 32-bits, is initially empty, and uses the least recently used replacement strategy. Show whether the following addresses hit or miss and list the final contents of the cache.

Addresses:

  1. 00010001
  2. 01101011
  3. 00111111
  4. 01001000
  5. 00011001
  6. 01000010
  7. 10001001
  8. 00000000
  9. 01001000
  10. 00011100
  11. 00110000
  12. 11111100
  13. 00111010

First off, with the given information, it seems to me that there will be 2 offset bits, 3 set bits, and 3 tag bits in the following order (T=tag,S=set,O=offset): TTTSSSOO

Example (address 1):

Tag=000 (0), Set = 100 (4), Offset = 01 (1)

Now, assuming this is correct, the following should happen when the above addresses are looked up:

  1. Miss, stored in set 4, block 0
  2. Miss, stored in set 2, block 0
  3. Miss, stored in set 7, block 0
  4. Miss, stored in set 2, block 1
  5. Miss, stored in set 6, block 0
  6. Miss, stored in set 0, block 0
  7. Miss, stored in set 2, block 0 (block 0 was LRU, now block 1 becomes LRU)
  8. Miss, stored in set 0, block 1
  9. Hits on set 2, block 1
  10. Miss, stored in set 7, block 1
  11. Miss, stored in set 6, block 1
  12. Miss, stored in set 7, block 0 (block 0 was LRU, now block 1 becomes LRU)
  13. Miss, stored in set 6, block 0 (block 0 was LRU, now block 1 becomes LRU)

And the final contents of the cache should look like the following:

Set 0: 01000010, 00000000

Set 1: empty, empty

Set 2: 10001001, 01001000

Set 3: empty, empty

Set 4: 00010001, empty

Set 5: empty, empty

Set 6: 00111010, 00110000

Set 7: 11111100, 00011100

I am having a very difficult time with this so hopefully someone can let me know if I am on the right track or not. If these look ok, I want to try the same exercise but with different addresses for further practice, to make sure that I've got it.

EDIT1: New addresses.

  1. 000_100_01
  2. 000_010_01
  3. 000_001_10
  4. 000_001_01
  5. 001_010_11
  6. 000_001_00
  7. 000_010_11
  8. 000_010_01
  9. 001_110_00
  10. 000_100_11
  11. 000_000_01
  12. 000_101_11
  13. 011_010_11

Which should like:

  1. Miss, stored in set 4 block 0
  2. Miss, stored in set 2 block 0
  3. Miss, stored in set 1 block 0
  4. Miss, stored in set 1 block 1, block 0 becomes LRU
  5. Miss, stored in set 2 block 1, block 0 becomes LRU
  6. Miss, stored in set 1 block 0, block 1 becomes LRU
  7. Miss, stored in set 2 block 0, block 1 becomes LRU
  8. Hit, set 2 block 0 becomes LRU
  9. Miss, stored in set 6 block 0
  10. Miss, stored in set 4 block 1
  11. Miss, stored in set 0 block 0
  12. Miss, stored in set 5 block 0
  13. Miss, stored in set 2 block 0, block 1 becomes LRU
share|improve this question
1  
The fact that you appear to have misread access 11 as 000_110_00 rather than 001_100_00, indicates that you should probably use separators in your addresses for clarity. (For such exercises, you could replace the least significant two bits with xx [don't care] or just drop them since the cache will load the entire block on a miss.) Also, You might note that access 9 makes block 0 LRU. Other than the misreading of access 11, it looks right. –  Paul A. Clayton Nov 5 '13 at 23:48
1  
In googling for a visual cache simulator, I encountered this page which seems to have some tools that you might find helpful in exploring computer architecture. (I have not examined them to see how good they are, but it seemed like they might be of interest to you.) –  Paul A. Clayton Nov 5 '13 at 23:50
    
Thank you very much. The Tomasulo algorithm on that website is very helpful. I am going to do an edit where I try it again with different numbers and look for input again. I had the LRU changing with access 9, that is a good comment for anyone following along with these though. –  basil Nov 6 '13 at 1:54
1  
In your second data set, access 4 should be a hit (3,4,6 are the same block). Likewise, 7 is a hit (2,7,8 are the same block). 10 is a hit (1,10 are the same block). –  Paul A. Clayton Nov 7 '13 at 13:48
1  
I simply did not mention the later effects of the earlier mistake; so, yes, 6 and 8 would be hits. –  Paul A. Clayton Nov 8 '13 at 1:40

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