Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a data frame where each row represents a recorded event. As an example, let's say I measured the speed of passing cars, and some cars passed me more than once.

cardata <- data.frame(
  car.ID = c(3,4,1,2,5,4,5),
  speed = c(100,121,56,73,87,111,107)
  )

I can sort the list and pull out the three fastest events...

top3<-head(cardata[order(cardata$speed,decreasing=TRUE),],n=3)
> top3
  car.ID speed
2      4   121
6      4   111
7      5   107

... but you'll notice that car 4 recorded the two fastest times. How do I find the three fastest events without any duplicate car ID's? I realize that may 'Top 3' list will not include the three fastest events in this instance.

share|improve this question

5 Answers 5

up vote 6 down vote accepted

You can use aggregate to first find the top speed per car.ID:

cartop <- aggregate(speed ~ car.ID, data = cardata, FUN = max)
top3 <- head(cartop[order(cartop$speed, decreasing = TRUE), ], n = 3)

 #   car.ID speed
 # 4      4   121
 # 5      5   107
 # 3      3   100
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! I couldn't think of a concise way to Google my problem. I like this solution because it works, doesn't require extra packages, and is easy to read/understand. –  user29484 Nov 5 '13 at 20:59

Using data.table instead of data.frame:

library(data.table)
dt = data.table(cardata)

# the easier to read way
dt[order(-speed), speed[1], by = car.ID][1:3]
#   car.ID  V1
#1:      4 121
#2:      5 107
#3:      3 100

# (probably) a faster way
setkey(dt, speed) # faster sort by speed
tail(dt[, speed[.N], by = car.ID], 3)
#  car.ID  V1
#1:      5 107
#2:      3 100
#3:      4 121

# and another way for fun (not sure how fast it is)
setkey(dt, car.ID, speed)
tail(dt[J(unique(car.ID)), mult = 'last'], 3)
share|improve this answer
    
+1 I had come up with tail({setkey(DT[, max(speed), by = car.ID], V1)}, 3) but figured there were much better ways to do this with "data.table". –  Ananda Mahto Nov 5 '13 at 20:42

With plyr you can do it as well. To select the top 3 for example:

library(plyr)
top3 <- ddply(ddply(cardata,.(car.ID),summarize, maxspeed=max(speed)),.(-maxspeed))[1:3,-1]

UPDATE

With the dplyr package you can do it faster and in a more clear way.

require(dplyr)

# Select for each car.ID the observation with the highest speed and sort.
top <- cardata  %>% 
    group_by(car.ID) %>% 
    arrange(-speed)%>%
    top_n(1)

# Take the top 3 of the resulting table.
top3 <- top[1:3,]
top3

#   car.ID speed
# 1      4   121
# 2      5   107
# 3      3   100
share|improve this answer

This is another base R way:

top.speeds <- unique(transform(cardata, speed=ave(speed, car.ID, FUN=max)))
top3 <- head(top.speeds[order(top.speeds$speed, decreasing=TRUE), ], n=3)
#   car.ID speed
# 2      4   121
# 5      5   107
# 1      3   100
share|improve this answer

I prefer solutions suggested using base R, but for completeness here is another way using sqldf:

library(sqldf)

cardata <- data.frame(
  car.ID = c(3,4,1,2,5,4,5),
  speed = c(100,121,56,73,87,111,107)
)

sqldf("
select car_ID, max(speed) as max_speed
from cardata
group by car_ID
order by max(speed) desc      
limit 3
      ")
share|improve this answer
    
@Downvoters, care to comment? –  zx8754 Nov 6 '13 at 8:36

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.