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Say I have objects type A, B, and C. I'd like to store them in an array. One way to do this would be like this:

A a = new A();
B b = new B();
C c = new C();

Object[] array = {a, b, c};

From a design perspective, this is less than ideal in that you now need to know that array[0] is of type A, but not unlike languages such as Ruby or Python that allow this type of thing.

That said, another option is to create a custom class D to hold that information:

private class D {
    public A myA;
    public B myB;
    public C myC;

    public D(A a, B b, C c) {
       //...
    }
}

D[] otherArray = new D[1];
otherArray[0] = new D(a, b, c);

Which approach is better? I can see arguments for the second approach for design reasons (although again, other languages deal with this all the time).

From a performance perspective, are the requisite upcasts/downcasts of the first approach more costly than creating the new D object repeatedly, or vice-versa?

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closed as primarily opinion-based by Jason C, Nathaniel Ford, Andrew, Duncan, rolfl Nov 10 '13 at 1:58

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

2  
It depends on your needs. If you need an array, use an array, if your objects need to work using each other help, it would be better storing them inside a class. – Luiggi Mendoza Nov 5 '13 at 22:31
    
If you know the data are an object of A followed by an object of B followed by an object of C, why not telling the type system about it so that it can check the type of what you put in? The more you tell the compiler, the safer you are. – Cyrille Ka Nov 5 '13 at 22:33
    
If a D is supposed to have an A, B, and C but you represent it as an Object[] instead, you now have to explicitly assume or validate invariants that otherwise would have been clearly expressed in code and enforced by the compiler (does the array have 3 elements of the appropriate type?). The result is a high risk of errors and a high difficulty of maintenance and testing, as well as added complexity of checking the array for validity if/when necessary. – Jason C Nov 5 '13 at 22:44
    
Could you give us details as to how you plan to use this class? That would determine what is the best solution. IMO the best way to do micro designs like this is by developing the using code first, ideally a unit-test so that you are building your tests at the same time. – Valentin Ruano Nov 5 '13 at 22:49

Java is an type-safe OO languages. Use classes and objects. So your second solution is much better (except I don't see why you would need a D array of 1 element).

The performance is irrelevant. Both will probably be as fast (with a light advantage for the second solution), and that is not where you'll have performance problems anyway. Don't pre-optimize: it's the root of all evil.

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Creating a new object with simple parameters in its constructor means very little performance-wise. There is a little more storage than keeping the values separated but this is really just the overhead that comes with a class: nothing you have to even take in account.

The second solution is far superior: it doesn't require any casting, it's a lot clearer for yourself and other developers, it's a lot more flexible because it allows you to manipulate and direct the data a lot more, etc etc.

Object[] obfuscates the data that it contains which is in many cases a plain anti-pattern.

If A, B and C are on the same level of hierarchy (f.e.: they're all 3 a subclass of Car) then they can be used in one array. If they belong together to construct a third class then they have to be grouped in an object.

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The question is, in your first case, what are you going to do with those values? Chances are that they have some operations in common. In this case, it is also possible to make an interface:

interface Giggler {
    public void giggle();    // the common operation
}

And now, make all objects that can giggle implement that interface. Then you can:

// assuming A, B and C implement Giggler
A a = new A(...);
B b = new B(...);
C c = new C(...);
Giggler[] array = new Giggler[] { a, b, c };
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"Best practice" is to use the method that is semantically correct and most appropriate for your needs.

By "semantically" correct I mean: What is the nature of your information? Is it supposed to be a collection of generic objects, or is it supposed to be a specific D with A, B, and C properties?

This also means that the code enforces invariants and structure implicitly, and that the meaning is clear. If a D is supposed to have an A, B, and C, then it makes sense to have a D with named, constrained fields -- that way you know a D always has three subobjects of a specified type, and the meaning is clear to the reader. If you're actually dealing with an arbitrary-sized collection of semantically neutral objects, then an array would more clearly convey your intentions.

If a D is supposed to have an A, B, and C but you represent it as an Object[] instead, you now have to explicitly assume or validate invariants that otherwise would have been clearly expressed in code and enforced by the compiler (does the array have 3 elements of the appropriate type?). The result is a high risk of errors and a high difficulty of maintenance and testing, as well as added complexity of checking the array for validity if/when necessary.

By "most appropriate" I mean cleanly compatible with any APIs you may be using, and convenient and leading to clear code. If you have an API that expects an Object[] or a D then it would be most convenient to use whatever type is compatible with that API.

It really depends on your situation. In general, though, "best practice" is to use the code that makes the most sense, is clean and easily readable, testable, and maintainable, given your specific situation.

From a performance perspective, it's completely moot. It is a mistake to think about this from the performance perspective. Unless your code is not meeting your performance requirements and you have identified the bottleneck as somehow being related to the type of this array, it is irrelevant. Additionally, most such micro-optimizations in Java are futile anyways, the JVM interpreter and hotspot compiler have far more control over the resulting code than you do.

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