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For those of you who have ever used the eBay app on a tablet device, you may have noticed that when you touch a product, the product view switches from a standard grid view like the following:

eBay tablet app grid view

To a view like the following where all the products are moved to a left nav and the details about the touched product are put in the right area:

eBay tablet app product details view

The thing that's really cool is the animation that transforms the view from one to the other.
Specifically, the product images shrink down a bit and then slide over to wherever they belong in the left nav. (This is much easier to see with the actual app than for me to explain.)

Anyway, I really like the animation, and I'd love to be able to create the same effect on a website using HTML/CSS, but I've had no luck.
I tried placing a bunch of divs next to each other on the screen and (with the click of a button) using CSS3 transitions to shrink the width of the containing div, but all that resulted in was the divs making a sudden jump from one location to another without any sort of fluid animation or movement, which I would ideally like.

If what I'm looking to achieve is impossible with just HTML/CSS, then that's fine, but I'd like to defer the question to those much wiser than me before I give you.
If anyone knows how to do this (or can conclusively tell me that it's impossible), I'd be very appreciative.

Thank you.

share|improve this question
    
no javascript allowed? –  Juventus18 Nov 5 '13 at 23:00
    
Anything that gets me the desired result is allowed, but mostly, I'm hoping to keep it as simple as possible. Do you have any ideas (either with or without JS)? –  HartleySan Nov 6 '13 at 0:27

2 Answers 2

It is not difficult, just a little boring to do all the details

for this html

<div class="container">
<div id="elem1"></div>
<div id="elem2"></div>
<div id="elem3"></div>
<div id="elem4"></div>
<div id="elem5"></div>
<div id="elem6"></div>
<div id="elem7"></div>
<div id="elem8"></div>
<div id="elem9"></div>
</div>

I have prepared this CSS

.container {
  position: relative;
  width: 300px;
  height: 300px;
  border: 1px solid green;
}

.container div {
  position: absolute;
  width: 100px;
  height: 100px;
  border: 1px solid red;
  background-color: lavender;
}

#elem5 {
  left: 100px;
  top: 100px;
}

.container:hover div {
  -webkit-animation-duration: 3s;
  -webkit-animation-direction: normal;
  -webkit-animation-fill-mode: forwards;
}

#elem5 {
  left: 100px;
  top: 100px;
}

.container:hover #elem5 {
  -webkit-animation-name: an5;
}

@-webkit-keyframes an5 {
  0% {-webkit-transform: scale(1);}
  50% {-webkit-transform: scale(0.33);}
  100% {-webkit-transform: translateX(-133px) scale(0.33);}
}

#elem9 {
  left: 200px;
  top: 200px;
}

.container:hover #elem9 {
  -webkit-animation-name: an9;
}

@-webkit-keyframes an9 {
  0% {-webkit-transform: scale(1);}
  50% {-webkit-transform: scale(0.33);}
  100% {-webkit-transform: translateX(-233px) translateY(33px) scale(0.33);}
}

I have set an array of 9 elements, that would fit an 3x3 grid. And I have positioned the 5th and 9th of them where they should be, and created an animation to move them to the list position.

(Only webkit transforms)

There is left to create animations for the other 7 elements, and to elaborate the animations (with more keyframes)

jfiddle

As per your comment, an alternate way to do it.

The demo is prepared for a grid of 3 columns. Then, the key is to have only the first child of every 3 in flow; the remaining 2 are out of flow since they are positioned absolute. This allows us to create generic rules based in nth-child for the positioning of the elements.

Once you have the animations set, this style adapts to any number of elements (and you have only to set as many animations as columns has your design)

CSS

.container {
  height: 500px;
}

.child {
  width: 100px;
  height: 100px;
  font-size: 40px;
  text-align: center;
  line-height: 90px;
  box-shadow: inset 0px 0px 2px black;
}

.child:nth-child(3n+1) {
     background-color: lightblue;
}

.child:nth-child(3n+2) {
     position: absolute;
     -webkit-transform: translate3d(100px, -100px, 0px);
     background-color: lightgreen;
}

.child:nth-child(3n) {
     position: absolute;
     -webkit-transform: translate3d(200px, -100px, 0px);
     background-color: lightyellow;
}

.container:hover .child {
  -webkit-animation-fill-mode: forwards;
  -webkit-animation-duration: 8s;
  -webkit-animation-iteration-count: 1;
  -webkit-animation-timing-function: linear;
  width: 300px;
}
.container:hover .child:nth-child(3n+1) {
  -webkit-animation-name: ani1;
}
.container:hover .child:nth-child(3n+2) {
  -webkit-animation-name: ani2;
}
.container:hover .child:nth-child(3n+3) {
  -webkit-animation-name: ani3;
}



@-webkit-keyframes ani1 {
  0% {width: 100px; -webkit-transform: scale(1);}
  50% {width: 300px; -webkit-transform: translate3d(-70px, -20px, 0px) scale(0.33);}
  100% {width: 300px; -webkit-transform: translate3d(-100px, -40px, 0px) scale(0.33);}
}

@-webkit-keyframes ani2 {
  0% {width: 100px;-webkit-transform: translate3d(100px, -100px, 0px) scale(1);}
  50% {width: 300px; -webkit-transform: translate3d(0px, -90px, 0px) scale(0.33);}
  100% {width: 300px; -webkit-transform: translate3d(-100px, -106px, 0px) scale(0.33);}
}
@-webkit-keyframes ani3 {
  0% {width: 100px; -webkit-transform: translate3d(200px, -100px, 0px) scale(1);}
  50% {width: 300px; -webkit-transform: translate3d(80px, -100px, 0px) scale(0.33) rotate(180deg);}
  100% {width: 300px; -webkit-transform: translate3d(-100px, -73px, 0px) scale(0.33)  rotate(359.99deg);}
}

Reusable fiddle

(Only for webkit. Just for fun, added some rotation)

share|improve this answer
    
Yeah, that does work. I was just hoping that there was a way to do it without using absolute positioning (which I should have mentioned in my original post). The problem is that in my case, I have a variable (large) number of items, and handing all the math for all of those items (any everything else on the screen is getting really tricky and is very error prone. Anyway, thanks for showing me that. –  HartleySan Nov 7 '13 at 2:33
    
You are right, added a more easy technique –  vals Nov 7 '13 at 18:55

On an iPad you can do this with the CSS -webkit-transform property.

CSS

.menu-open {
    -webkit-transform: translate3d(260px, 0, 0);
}

#main {
    -webkit-transition: -webkit-transform 150ms ease-in;
    transition: -webkit-transform 150ms ease-in;
    overflow: visible;
    width: 100%;
    margin: 0;
    padding: 0;
    outline: 0;
    border: 0;
    top: 0;
    left: 0;
    position: absolute;
    color: #333;
    background-color: white;
    display: block;
    min-height: 100%;
}

#menu 
{
    position: absolute;
    width: 100%;
    position: absolute;
    width: 259px;
    top: 0;
    left: 0;
    background: white;
    margin: auto;
    min-height: 100%; 
    height:auto !important; 
    height:100%; 
    overflow: hidden !important;
    display:block;
}

HTML

<div id="menu" style="display:none; background-color: #cccccc;">
    <div>Text</div>
</div>
<div id="main">
    <input type="button" id="menuToggle" value="Toggle" />
</div>

JS

function showMenu() {
    $("#menu").show(0);

    $("#main").addClass('menu-open');
}

function hideMenu() {
    if ($("#main").hasClass('menu-open')) {
        $("#main").removeClass('menu-open');
        setTimeout(function () { $("#menu").hide(); }, 500);
    }
}

$(document).ready(function () {
    var body = $("#main"),
        menuToggle = $('#menuToggle'),
        menu = $("#menu");

    menuToggle.bind('click', function (ev) {
        ev.preventDefault();
        if (body.hasClass('menu-open')) {
            hideMenu();
        } else {
            showMenu();
        }
    });
});

See this JsFiddle for an example. Hope I understood you correctly (no iPad here at the moment).

share|improve this answer
    
Unfortunately, that's not what I was looking for. Sorry for the poor description. Really, unless you have a tablet with the eBay app and can see the transition yourself, it's hard to imagine. Anyway, I can get everything to move fine, but what I really wanted was the cool animation that shifts everything from the one view to the next. Thanks anyway. –  HartleySan Nov 6 '13 at 3:41

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