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I searched around a lot but I am currently stumped. I am looking to simplify an array so it's a little easier to work with ...

Right now my array looks like this:

[[{"title"=>"Test Entry 2", "date"=>"2013-11-01 21:05"}, "\nThis is just another test entry."], [{"title"=>"Test Entry", "date"=>"2013-11-01 18:05"}, "\nThis is just a test entry."]]

And to print these values I currently have:

entries.each do |x|
  puts x[0]["title"]
  puts x[0]["date"]
  puts x[1]
end

I would like it to look like this (I think):

[{"title"=>"Test Entry 2", "date"=>"2013-11-01 21:05", "content"=>"\nThis is just another test entry".}], [{"title"=>"Test Entry", "date"=>"2013-11-01 18:05", "content"="\nThis is just a test entry.}]

I'm looking to be able to call these values easily with a loop, something like:

entries.each do |entry|
  puts entry["title"]
  puts entry["date"]
  puts entry["content"]
end

Any help would be appreciated. Thanks for looking!!

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2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

How about

a = [[{"title"=>"Test Entry 2", "date"=>"2013-11-01 21:05"}, "\nThis is just another test entry."], [{"title"=>"Test Entry", "date"=>"2013-11-01 18:05"}, "\nThis is just a test entry."]]

a.map! {|hsh, content| hsh['content'] = content; hsh }

#=> [{"title"=>"Test Entry 2", "date"=>"2013-11-01 21:05", "content"=>"\nThis is just another test entry."}, {"title"=>"Test Entry", "date"=>"2013-11-01 18:05", "content"=>"\nThis is just a test entry."}]

This works b/c the map block can take multiple arguments which are assigned in index order of the array. So map iterates over the a array, pulling out each hash and content string. We then assign the content string to a new content member of the hash and return the hash.

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That does add the "content" value but leaves the ", "\nThis is just another test entry" at the end. Thanks. –  Danny I. Nov 6 '13 at 0:11
    
I added the output I get from the code above to the answer. Not sure exactly what you are referring to. –  Alex.Bullard Nov 6 '13 at 0:14
    
Ahhh I see the problem. My mistake, I was assuming that you would just use the return value of map. Switch the call to map! to modify the array in place –  Alex.Bullard Nov 6 '13 at 0:23
    
Perfect! Thanks for the help Alex. Sometimes I just can't figure out where to look. –  Danny I. Nov 6 '13 at 0:25

You've already did it. After correcting a small mistake, you are getting following

entries=[
  {"title"=>"Test Entry 2", "date"=>"2013-11-01 21:05", "content"=>"\nThis is just another test entry."},
  {"title"=>"Test Entry", "date"=>"2013-11-01 18:05", "content"=>"\nThis is just a test entry."}
]

entries.each do |entry|
  puts entry["title"] # Test Entry 2
  puts entry["date"]  # 2013-11-01 21:05
  puts entry["content"] # 
                        # This is just another test entry.
end

Just a Array of Hash(es). You can also display values with entry.keys.each {|k| puts entry[k]} expression.

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