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I often prefer to use references than pointers whenever possible, it makes the syntax cleaner in my opinion. In this case, I have a class:

class Foo
{
public:
    Foo(Bar & bar) : bar_(bar) {}

private:
    Bar & bar_;
};

operator=() is implicitely deleted by the compiler for such a class, since once a reference is set, it cannot be changed (I can technically define my own that doesn't change bar_, but this would not be the required behaviour, so I'd rather the compiler complain if I try to assign a foo).

What I need is a std::vector<Foo> v;. This is impossible before C++11, since the template parameter must to be CopyAssignable. Indeed, when I call v.push_back(Foo(bar));, the compiler complains. But I feel it could be possible since C++11 and Move semantics.

My question is: is there a workaround using C++11 that would make building such a vector possible, or am I stuck in this case and have no way around using pointers instead of references? If there's a workaround, I'd highly appreciate a code snippet since I'm unfamiliar with move semantics.

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1  
I think emplace back is what your looking for – aaronman Nov 6 '13 at 0:44
    
    
Does Foo(const Foo && foo) : bar_(foo.bar_) {} not solve this? – Sam Cristall Nov 6 '13 at 0:54
    
I'm sure, depending on how your classes define their constructors, that push_back will work fine using implicit move generation. Your example compiles fine for me? – Aesthete Nov 6 '13 at 1:04
    
You need the std::optional or the boost::optional. Both of them have the size of a pointer. boost::optional< T & >/boost::optional< T const & > have desired semantic. – Orient Nov 6 '13 at 10:43
up vote 6 down vote accepted

Voila emplace_back is able to do the job because of perfect forwarding.

#include <vector>                                                                  

class Bar{};                                                                       
class Foo                                                                          
{                                                                                  
public:                                                                            
    Foo(Bar & bar) : bar_(bar) {}                                                  

private:                                                                           
    Bar & bar_;                                                                    
};                                                                                 
using namespace std;                                                               
int main() {                                                                       
    vector<Foo> v;                                                                 
    Bar bar;
    v.emplace_back(bar);                                                     
} 

You can also store a reference by itself in a container with std::reference_wrapper used likestd::vector<std::reference_wrapper<int>> v

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@Boris can you post a full example that doesn't compile because I actually realized for my example push_back compiles too – aaronman Nov 6 '13 at 1:13
    
@Boris what's the exact error? – aaronman Nov 6 '13 at 1:16
    
@Boris sorry I'll take a look but it might be hard to figure out what's wrong since I don't have that compiler – aaronman Nov 6 '13 at 1:34
1  
You should be passing the arguments for Foo's constructor directly to emplace_back, otherwise you're creating an unnecessary temporary object and calling the copy/move constructor. – Trillian Nov 6 '13 at 1:56
1  
@aaronman that should be v.emplace_back(bar) not v.emplace_back(Foo(bar)). emplace is meant to take constructor arguments for the type being created, not on object of that type. @Boris - yeah, gcc 4.6 is pretty far back on the c++11 support. 4.8 is much better. – Charlie Nov 6 '13 at 3:47

Use v.emplace_back(bar) instead of push_back. It will construct a Foo in place in the memory vector has allocated for it, thus requiring no copying. Just pass emplace_back the arguments to construct a Foo.

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+1 for providing the correct syntax, I accepted aaronman for code snippet :) – Boris Nov 6 '13 at 21:52

The template parameter of a container doens't have to be CopyAssignable, it depends on what operations you perform on your container, and if you really use operation that requires CopyAssignable or MoveAssignable, you cannot use a reference as you wish (even with move semantic). But if you use only other operations (see standard), it will be fine. Some operations only needed CopyInsertable, MoveInstable and/or EmplaceConstructible.

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