Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I've got a "Vector" struct which stores a x, y, and z values. In an effort to make them easier to access I added an index operator, like this:

public struct Vector
{
    public double x;
    public double y;
    public double z;

    public double this[int i]
    {
        get
        {
            if(i == 0) return x;
            else if(i == 1) return y;
            else if(i == 2) return z;
            else throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException("i", i, "Index must be 0, 1, or 2");
        }
        set
        {
            if (i == 0) x = value;
            else if (i == 1) y = value;
            else if (i == 2) z = value;
            else throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException("i", i, "Index must be 0, 1, or 2");
        }
    }
}

Note: Normally I would use an array instead of x, y, z but I'm working with pre-existing code and it'll be difficult to refactor at this point.

Now if I use a struct as an auto-property in a class and then try to modify its xyz values, I get this

public Vector v{ get; set; }
void funct(){
    for(int i = 0; i < 3; i++)
    {
        v[i] = 3.0;
    }
}

I get a compiler error:

"Cannot modify the return value of "v" because it is not a variable"

I've tried googling for the error, but I don't think anyone has done this the way I did (it's a pretty interesting case I guess, and probably really ugly). What would be the right way to solve this problem? Is it wrong to use the index operator like this?

Note: yes, I know this is a mutable struct. Again, pre-existing code

share|improve this question
    
Have your tried this.v[i] = 3.0; –  Justin Lessard Nov 6 '13 at 2:10
    
@Zirkonix That would give the same error. –  Servy Nov 6 '13 at 2:11
2  
"I don't think anyone has done this the way I did" Actually, they have. In fact, it's so common for people to have done this that they added an error to the compiler to specifically cover this exact case, because so many people have been bitten by this bug as a result of not understanding the semantics of mutable structs. Just look at the actual Google results of the related searches, as they are exactly the situation that you're in. Note that using an indexer is no different than any other means of mutating a struct, such as setting a property or field directly. –  Servy Nov 6 '13 at 2:12
2  
possible duplicate of Can't modify XNA Vector components –  Servy Nov 6 '13 at 2:16
    
yeah, it's pretty much the same reason as that link. Should've googled better before asking. I still want to be able to iterate nicely through x,y,z in the struct. Is there a better way of doing it? –  9a3eedi Nov 6 '13 at 2:19
show 5 more comments

1 Answer

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You got some options:

  1. Make it a class instead of a struct
  2. Obtain a copy of the struct value first, modify it, then put it back:

    Vector temp = v;
    for(int i = 0; i < 3; i++)
    {
        temp[i] = 3.0;
    }
    v = temp;
    
  3. Make it immutable and add helper/factory methods:

    public struct Vector
    {
        ....
    
        public Vector WithX(double x)
        {
            return new Vector(x, this.y, this.z);
        }
    

I would personally go for nbr. 3 as mutable structs (as you've seen) is a pain in the a**.

share|improve this answer
    
I've decided to go for option 2. That works well enough given my needs. Option 1 and 3 would require a lot of refactoring for me at this point. In my case, option 1 is probably not a good idea because I want this to be allocated on the stack when used in a function, so a struct is suitable. Maybe sometime in the future I will make a big refactor and implement option 3. –  9a3eedi Nov 7 '13 at 1:41
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.