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#define NAME RAGHU
#define NAIVE_STR(x) #x
int main()
{
printf("%s", NAIVE_STR(NAME)); 
getch();
return 0;
}    

how can we modify the code so that whatever we had defined in NAME get printed?

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Is there a reason for not using #define NAME "RAGHU"? – rand Nov 6 '13 at 11:10
up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can use something like

#define NAME RAGHU
#define NAIVE_STR(x) #x
#define DEF_TO_STRING(x) NAIVE_STR(x)
int main()
{
    printf("%s", DEF_TO_STRING(NAME)); 
    getch();
    return 0;
}     

This is how defines work. When you call NAIVE_STR(NAME) pre-processor sees #x and doesn't substitute x with it's value so string NAME is returned. But when you call DEF_TO_STRING(NAME) it doesn't see # and substitutes NAME with RAGHU and then calls NAIVE_STR(RAGHU) and NAIVE_STR(RAGHU) just returns RAGHU

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1  
+1. Clever way to do it without modifying the existing #defines – parrowdice Nov 6 '13 at 11:19
    
@parrowdice May you suggest one? – Rakesh_Kumar Nov 6 '13 at 11:26
1  
@Rakesh_Kumar I don't think there are any other options because it is the way suggested by compiler developers gcc.gnu.org/onlinedocs/cpp/Stringification.html – igoris Nov 8 '13 at 15:24
    
@Rakesh_Kumar if that was helpful for you, please consider marking my answer as accepted. – igoris Nov 25 '13 at 17:42

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