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I've created a HTML based report that can be variable lengths and number of segments in C# (which is why Crystal Reports wasn't used) and I can't use the wonderful http://www.printfriendly.com/ as the report is Intranet based (boooo, hiss).

I've created a media=print CSS file that is used to make the formatting as paper and ink efficient as possible but I have a problem. There is a very long table in the report with around 50 table rows, each one around height: 200px. Unfortunately some of the table rows are being sliced due to the automatic page breaking, with part of the table row on one page and the rest on the next page. Is there anyway (hopefully via CSS), to set the pagebreaking options to not seperate table elements (or similar elements)?

Thanks, Alex

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I wish CSS handled printing tables better but it does not seem to behave nicely with the CSS page break options. I'd also like to see a solution to this one. –  Shawn Steward Dec 30 '09 at 16:59
    
Apologies for the late response to the answers, have been on a short holiday. After some careful consideration I've decided to give the answer to Brian as he did find some interesting results through his testing, and suggested a solution with Prince. I also marked markjgrant's answer up as it was a possible solution through a hack that I hadn't thought of. –  Alex Jan 6 '10 at 9:14

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The page-break-inside: avoid property should control this, but it looks like most browsers don't support that on tr or td elements. In my testing, Opera is the only one that honors this property, as used in the following test:

<!DOCTYPE html>
<title>Page Break Test</title>
<style>tr, td { page-break-inside: avoid }</style>
<table border=1>
  <tr height=200><td>This is a test. This should be tall.<td>Another column.
  <tr height=200><td>This is a test. This should be tall.<td>Another column.
  <tr height=200><td>This is a test. This should be tall.<td>Another column.
  <tr height=200><td>This is a test. This should be tall.<td>Another column.
  <tr height=200><td>This is a test. This should be tall.<td>Another column.
  <tr height=200><td>This is a test. This should be tall.<td>Another column.
  <tr height=200><td>This is a test. This should be tall.<td>Another column.
  <tr height=200><td>This is a test. This should be tall.<td>Another column.
  <tr height=200><td>This is a test. This should be tall.<td>Another column.
  <tr height=200><td>This is a test. This should be tall.<td>Another column.
  <tr height=200><td>This is a test. This should be tall.<td>Another column.
  <tr height=200><td>This is a test. This should be tall.<td>Another column.
  <tr height=200><td>This is a test. This should be tall.<td>Another column.
  <tr height=200><td>This is a test. This should be tall.<td>Another column.
  <tr height=200><td>This is a test. This should be tall.<td>Another column.
  <tr height=200><td>This is a test. This should be tall.<td>Another column.
</table>

If you can use Opera, this might be good enough. Another option would be to look into Prince for printing your reports, as it tends to have much better support for print stylesheet features than the browsers do (though I haven't tested this feature in particular).

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If your row height happens to be fixed, you could figure out how many rows fit on a page, then use page-break-after: always on every n-th row to force page breaks in the appropriate places. It's a bit of a hack, but it might be your best option.

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1  
But he will never know for sure how many will fit, because different browsers print differently, users can increase/decrease font size, and users can change print margins and page size. –  Bryan Batchelder Dec 30 '09 at 19:36
    
media=print CSS can minimize these factors, though not eliminate them entirely. –  keithjgrant Jan 5 '10 at 21:48

Unfortunately, it is impossible to reliably accomplish what you want with HTML.

If you want a high level of control over what is printed, I suggest you have your report generator output PDF or XPS rather than HTML (or as Brian Campbell advised, by using a tool such as Prince that can take HTML and convert it to PDF).

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