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Well I did not know what exactly would be a good title for this because it is a most peculiar situation or I'm abnormally dumb.

Here's what im trying to do.

Create a simple <meter> tag which is new in HTML5. The main issue is with my javascript. Im trying to increment the value of the meter tag gradually in my javascript. But somehow it doesn't work the way i want.

JavaScript.

for (var i = 0; i <= 10; i++) {
    var a = document.getElementById("mtr1");
    setTimeout(function () {
        console.log(i);
        a.value = i;
    }, 250);
}

I'm trying to increase the value of the meter gradually every 250 ms.This doesn't happen. Instead the meter jumps straight to 10.

What interested me was the value of i that i got in the console. I got instances of 10, instead of 1,2,3...10.

Why does this happen?

FIDDLE

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1  
setTimeout is a deferred event, it does not run inline so your for loop will exit without the function ever running, then 10 seconds later it will increment a. –  Liam Nov 6 '13 at 13:12
1  
This question has already been answered many times here, search for javascript closure and scope. –  Matteo Tassinari Nov 6 '13 at 13:13
    
possible duplicate of JavaScript Closures and setTimeout –  Liam Nov 6 '13 at 13:14
    
So many incorrect answers........ –  Liam Nov 6 '13 at 13:22
    
Yeah, maybe it is a duplicate. But not a very widely encountered problem. Judging by many incorrect answers i got i still think many ppl are unaware of this. –  MarsOne Nov 6 '13 at 13:25

9 Answers 9

up vote 5 down vote accepted

It's a JavaScript closures' classic. Here i is an actual reference to the variable, not its copy. After you've iterated through the loop it has the value of 10, that's why all log invocations write 10 to log.
This should work better:

for (var i = 0; i <= 10; i++) {
    var a = document.getElementById("mtr1");
    setTimeout(function (i) {
        return function() {
            console.log(i);
            a.value = i;
        };
    }(i), 250 * i);
}

Here the most inner i is the setTimeout's callback argument, not the variable which you've declared in the loop body.

share|improve this answer
    
I was just writing this. –  j0hnstew Nov 6 '13 at 13:14
    
This is the correct answer –  Liam Nov 6 '13 at 13:18
    
Got it. Thanks. –  MarsOne Nov 6 '13 at 13:21
    
@MarsOne you're welcome. take a look at my updated answer, I added corrected version of your code. –  aga Nov 6 '13 at 13:27
1  
Glad to help you. :) @MarsOne, I personally recommend you to read 'JavaScript: The Good Parts' by Douglas CrockFord. It's small (150+ pages or so), and it's definitely worth reading, after reading it I can understand the beauty of plalx' solution. –  aga Nov 6 '13 at 13:45

You should read more about closures in JavaScript. When a variable gets closed over, it's the same exact variable, not a copy. Since setTimeout is asynchronous, the whole loop finishes before any of the functions run, therefore the i variable will be 10 everywhere.

DEMO

function incMtrAsync(max, delay, el) {
    if (el.value++ < max) {
        setTimeout(incMtrAsync.bind(null, max, delay, el), delay);
    }   
}

incMtrAsync(10, 250, document.getElementById("mtr1"));

The above implementation implements the loop using a recursive approach. Everytime inMtrAsync is called, it checks if the value of the meter reached the max value, and if not, registers another timeout with a callback to itself.

If you want to delay the initial increment as well, just wrap the first call in another timeout.

setTimeout(incMtrAsync.bind(null, 10, 250, document.getElementById("mtr1")), 250);
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I don't know what closures have in common with setTimeout, but the rest is the very best solution. +1 –  Entity Black Nov 6 '13 at 13:24
    
plalx, i think your DEMO points to my fiddle –  MarsOne Nov 6 '13 at 13:32
    
+1 for the working solution. But its a bit complicated for me. So il stick with an easier one. –  MarsOne Nov 6 '13 at 13:34
    
@MarsOne Yeah the link is fixed now. I strongly advise you to use this approach over the other one. –  plalx Nov 6 '13 at 13:38
1  
@plalx beatiful solution, +1 for this. –  aga Nov 6 '13 at 13:43

Nobody used setInterval, so here's my solution ( http://jsfiddle.net/Qh6gb/4/) :

var a = document.getElementById("mtr1");
var i = 0;
var interval = setInterval(function () {
    console.log(i);
    a.value = ++i;
    if (i == 10) {
        clearInterval(interval);
    }
}, 250);
share|improve this answer
    
I like this approach. Seems simple enough –  MarsOne Nov 6 '13 at 13:22
    
Yep, that's another clean way to do it. –  plalx Nov 6 '13 at 13:50

The problem you describe happens before the asyncronous call to setTimeout in your original version sees a value of 10 for i because that is its value at the moment the callback is executed.

So, this is a problem with the scope of the closure, to make it work you should make it like this:

for (var i = 0; i <= 10; i++) {
    var a = document.getElementById("mtr1");
    (function (i, a) {
        setTimeout(function () {
          console.log(i);
          a.value = i;
        }, 250);
    })(i, a);
}

also, since a is always the same, this should be better:

var a = document.getElementById("mtr1");
for (var i = 0; i <= 10; i++) {
    (function (i) {
        setTimeout(function () {
          console.log(i);
          a.value = i;
        }, 250);
    })(i);
}

If then you want to see the counter "ticking up", this will make it visible:

var a = document.getElementById("mtr1");
for (var i = 0; i <= 10; i++) {
    (function (i) {
        setTimeout(function () {
          console.log(i);
          a.value = i;
        }, 1000 * i);
    })(i);
}

See http://jsfiddle.net/LDt4d/

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It happens because you called setTimeout, which is "asynchronous". So setTimeout is called 10times but after whole loop is done then it is executed. Therefore, i = 10 in each call...

http://jsfiddle.net/Qh6gb/9/

there is the solution:

var i = 1,
    meter = document.getElementById("mtr1");

function increase() {
    meter.value = i++;
    console.log(i);
    if(i<=10) {
        setTimeout(increase, 250);
    }
}

setTimeout(increase, 250);
share|improve this answer
1  
not sure what the -2 was for, this isn't far off. –  Liam Nov 6 '13 at 13:15
    
yeah I don't understand too... my first explain was correct, just a little short... –  Entity Black Nov 6 '13 at 13:19
1  
Only thing I can think is the use of the word asynchronous, javascript is never asynchronous, even when it may appear it is running in this manner. It uses a deferred model rather than multiple threads. –  Liam Nov 6 '13 at 13:23

you can use timeout jquery plugin:. It is easier

However you should calculate your timeout ,

For you ,timeout=250*max=250*10=2500

So

$('meter').timeout(2500);

Demo

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Run for loop inside the function instead of declaring a closure in every step of the loop.

JSFIDDLE: http://jsfiddle.net/Qh6gb/3/

var a = document.getElementById("mtr1");
setTimeout(function () {      
    for (var i = 0; i < 10; i++) {
        console.log(i);
        a.value = i;
    }
}, 250);
share|improve this answer
1  
This is what you want. –  j0hnstew Nov 6 '13 at 13:14
1  
he wants each iteration to be executed 250 ms apart i beleive –  Matthew Mcveigh Nov 6 '13 at 13:16
    
@MatthewMcveigh is right, this isn't what you want at all. –  Liam Nov 6 '13 at 13:16

I hope I understand right. Please try and tell me if you got solution.

var count = 0;
function increment(){
    document.getElementById("meter").value = count; 
    count++; 
    if(count ==10) 
        count=0;
}
setInterval(increment, 250);

Please check with jsFiddle

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You're creating multiple functions that are all being set off at the same time. Multiply the timer by i for correct delay.

for (var i = 0; i <= 10; i++) {
var a = document.getElementById("mtr1");
setTimeout(function () {
    console.log(i);
    a.value = i;
}, 250 * i);
}
share|improve this answer
    
wrong, wrong and wrong –  Liam Nov 6 '13 at 13:14

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