Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have these C++ classes defined as follows:

class A
{
public:
    B *createB();
};

class B 
{
public:
    virtual void fun() = 0;
};
class B1 : B {/* ... */};
class B2 : B {/* ... */};

So basically B is an abstract class, B1 and B2 are concrete implementations of B, and A creates an instance of type B somewhere in its code. It's important to note that A is not a factory, A::createB is just an example.

I'd like to be able to pass a subclass of B during initialization of A so it is possible to create instances of the former by the latter as necessary during runtime. Example:

A *a1 = /* sorcery here */;
A *a2 = /* another magic code */;

a1->createB(); // getting B1
a2->createB(); // getting B2

What is the best way to achieve it? Is it possible without using templates?


Basing on responses I ended up with this. Thanks!

class B
{
public:
    virtual void fun() = 0;
    virtual B *clone() = 0;
};

class B1 : public B
{
public:
    virtual void fun()
    {
        std::cout << "B1" << std::endl;
    }
    virtual B *clone()
    {
        return new B1();
    }
};

class B2 : public B {/* analogous to B1 */};

class A
{
public:
    A(B *b) : b(b) {};

    B *createB()
    {
        return b->clone();
    }
private:
    B *b;
};

A(new B1()).createB()->fun(); // prints "B1"
A(new B2()).createB()->fun(); // prints "B2"
share|improve this question
add comment

3 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Implement a clone() method in B.

Pass a B* to A when creating it. A will call B's clone() with that B* as a parameter.

For further information about cloning see questions Which situation will use clone in C++ and how to use it?, What's the best signature for clone() in C++? and How to write a clone method easily?, among others.

share|improve this answer
add comment

You can use the Prototype design pattern to achieve this. Pass A an instance of B1 or B2, and add a clone() member function to B, like this:

class B 
{
public:
    virtual void fun() = 0;
    virtual B* clone() = 0; // B1::clone returns new B1; B2::clone returns new B2
};

A stores the prototype instance of B passed in during initialization for later use. When it needs to create a new B later on, it calls clone() on the prototype to get an instance of the right class.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Sounds like you want abstract factory.

You can see example here :

#include <iostream>
#include <string>

class Window
{
protected:
int width;
int height;
std::string toolkit;
std::string type;

Window(std::string usedToolkit, std::string windowType)
: toolkit(usedToolkit), type(windowType)
{}

public:
std::string getToolkit()
{
return toolkit;
}

std::string getType()
{
return type;
}
};

class GtkToolboxWindow : public Window
{
public:
GtkToolboxWindow()
: Window("Gtk", "ToolboxWindow")
{}
};

class GtkLayersWindow : public Window
{
public:
GtkLayersWindow()
: Window("Gtk", "LayersWindow")
{}
};

class GtkMainWindow : public Window
{
public:
GtkMainWindow()
: Window("Gtk", "MainWindow")
{}
};


class QtToolboxWindow : public Window
{
public:
QtToolboxWindow()
: Window("Qt", "ToolboxWindow")
{}
};

class QtLayersWindow : public Window
{
public:
QtLayersWindow()
: Window("Qt", "LayersWindow")
{}
};

class QtMainWindow : public Window
{
public:
QtMainWindow()
: Window("Qt", "MainWindow")
{}
};


/* This is the abstract factory. */
class UIFactory
{
public:
virtual Window* getToolboxWindow() = 0;
virtual Window* getLayersWindow() = 0;
virtual Window* getMainWindow() = 0;

};

/* Factory for Gtk toolkit */
class GtkUIFactory : public UIFactory
{
public:
Window* getToolboxWindow()
{
return new GtkToolboxWindow();
}

Window* getLayersWindow()
{
return new GtkLayersWindow();
}

Window* getMainWindow()
{
return new GtkMainWindow();
}
};

/* Factory for Qt toolkit */
class QtUIFactory : public UIFactory
{
public:
Window* getToolboxWindow()
{
return new QtToolboxWindow();
}

Window* getLayersWindow()
{
return new QtLayersWindow();
}

Window* getMainWindow()
{
return new QtMainWindow();
}
};

int main()
{
UIFactory* ui = 0;

/* Check what environment is running
and create appropriate factory. */
if (/* Gtk == */ true)
{
ui = new GtkUIFactory();
}
else
{
ui = new QtUIFactory();
}

/* Use the factory to build interface. */
Window* toolbox = ui->getToolboxWindow();
Window* layers = ui->getLayersWindow();
Window* main = ui->getMainWindow();

/* See what have we recieved. */
std::cout << toolbox->getToolkit() << ":"
<< toolbox->getType() << std::endl;

std::cout << layers->getToolkit() << ":"
<< layers->getType() << std::endl;

std::cout << main->getToolkit() << ":"
<< main->getType() << std::endl;
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.