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Hi I have following JavaScript code that I am trying to run. My aim is to grasp the meaning of this in different scopes and different types of invocations in JavaScript.

If you look in code below: I have a inner anonymous function, which is getting assigned to innerStuff variable. In that anonymous function as such this points to window object and not the outer function object or anything else. Event though it still has access to out function's variables.

Anyway, I am not sure, why that would be; but if you look at code below, I pass this in form of that to innerStuff later and it works just fine and prints object with doofus attribute in console.

    var someStuff = {
        doofus:"whatever",
        newF: function()
        {
            var that = this;
            console.log(that);
            var innerStuff = function(topThis){
                console.log(topThis);
            };

            return innerStuff(that);
        }
    }

    someStuff.newF();

Now I am changing a code only little bit. And instead of assigning it to innerStuff, I'll just directly return the function by invoking it as shown below:

    var someStuff = {
        doofus:"whatever",
        newF: function()
        {
            var that = this;
            console.log(that);
            return function(that){
                console.log(that);
            }();
        }
    }

    someStuff.newF();

This prints undefined for the inner anonymous function. Is it because there is a clash between a that that is being passed as parameter and a that defined in outside function? I thought the parameter would have overriden the visibility. Why would the value be not retained?

This is utterly confusing.

On the other hand if I don't pass that, but instead just use it, because visibility is there, the outcome is proper and as expected.

What is it that I am missing? Is it the clash between the variables, present in same scope? Is there a good reason, that inner functions have this bound to window object?

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3 Answers

up vote 9 down vote accepted

this in JavaScript refers to the object that you called a method on. If you invoke a function as someObject.functionName(args), then this will be bound to that object. If you simply invoke a bare function, as in functionName(args), then this will be bound to the window object.

Inside of newF in the second example, you are shadowing the that variable in your inner function, but not passing anything into it, so it is undefined.

        var that = this;
        console.log(that);
        return function(that){
            console.log(that);
        }();

You probably want the following instead, if you want something that is equivalent to your first example (passing that in to the inner function):

        var that = this;
        console.log(that);
        return function(that){
            console.log(that);
        }(that);

Or the following, if you don't want to shadow it and just use the outer function's binding:

        var that = this;
        console.log(that);
        return function(){
            console.log(that);
        }();
share|improve this answer
    
ah!! can't believe I missed that. Thanks a ton. –  Priyank Dec 30 '09 at 18:09
    
Well, it is completely different to how bound methods work in every other language that has them... –  bobince Dec 30 '09 at 18:28
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In your second example, when you invoke the anonymous function, the parameter that is not defined (you aren't passing anything to it.) You can do this:

    newF: function()
    {
        var that = this;
        console.log(that);
        return function(that){
            console.log(that);
        }(that); // note that we are passing our 'that' in as 'that'
    }

That will keep the proper value of the variable around.

However, since you are scoping var that above, you could just remove the function parameter as well:

    newF: function()
    {
        var that = this;
        console.log(that);
        return function(){
            console.log(that);
        }(); // 'that' is referenced above.
    }

As far as why anonymous functions have window as their this: whenever you call a function without a context (i.e. somef() vs context.somef()) this will point to the window object.

You can override that and pass a this using .apply(context, argumentsArray) or .call(context, arg1, arg2, arg3) on a function. An example:

    newF: function()
    {
        console.log('Outer:', this);
        var innerF = function(){
            console.log('Inner:', this);
        };
        return innerF.apply(this,arguments);
    }
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In your first code example, the anonymous function, though declared within a function that is a member of the someStuff object, is not a member of the someStuff object. For that reason, this in that function is a reference to the window object. If you wanted to invoke the anonymous function and have control over the this reference, you could do the following:

var someStuff = {
    doofus:"whatever",
    newF: function()
    {
        var that = this;
        console.log(that);
        var innerStuff = function(){
            console.log(this);
        };

        return innerStuff.apply(this);
    }
}

someStuff.newF();

In your second example, your actually creating an anonymous function, executing it, and then returning the value that the anonymous function returned. However, your anonymous function did not return anything. Additionally, you have a variable name conflict. You could do:

var someStuff = {
    doofus:"whatever",
    newF: function()
    {
        var that = this;
        console.log(that);
        return function(){
            console.log(that);
            return true;
        }();
    }
}

someStuff.newF();

I added the return true because your function should return something, since the function that is executing it is returning the return value of the anonymous function. Whether it returns true or false or a string or an object or whatever else depends on the scenario.

share|improve this answer
    
I agree with first point that I could use a "apply" invocation, but second point is incorrect. There is no name conflict as the passed parameter does override the param in outer function. The mistake I did was that I didn't pass the param to the anonymous function while making the call. [As shown by Brian in example above] He stands corrected as his suggested solution worked just fine. As for return value; I don't think so I cared too much; I just wanted to see how the value of this/that was being scoped inside the inner function. Thanks for your help though. –  Priyank Dec 30 '09 at 18:24
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