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i'm trying to format this better so it prints out as one block of text (spaces are ok)

right now it's printing like this [4444, 4444] and i want it to print 4444 4444

#secret code encrypter 

def encoder(plain):
    '''encodes a given input with a secret formula
    '''
    result = []

    for i in plain:
        i=ord(i)*77+4
        result.append(i)

    return result 

def main():

    plain=input('Enter a sentence: ')
    final=encoder(plain)

    print(final)

main()
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3  
"encodes a given input with a secret formula" — no longer secret –  Ramchandra Apte Nov 6 '13 at 15:24

5 Answers 5

Make them strings and join them:

print(' '.join(map(str, your_list)))

Even better (if you're using Python 3.x) to avoid explicit conversion:

print(*your_list)
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That second one is cool. Is that splat like Ruby's, or is it something else? –  Linuxios Nov 6 '13 at 15:33
1  
@Linuxios yup it's splat... print as a function takes a variable number of arguments so it's handy... Could use to print each on a new line for instance using print(*your_list, sep='\n') without looping or joining '\n's –  Jon Clements Nov 6 '13 at 15:46
    
Thanks! Just like Ruby. So many little tricks. –  Linuxios Nov 6 '13 at 15:47
    
I think you meant conversion instead of conversation, unless your python code is really talkative :-) –  UpAndAdam Nov 6 '13 at 15:52
    
@UpAndAdam LOL... what a typo... corrected - thanks :) –  Jon Clements Nov 6 '13 at 15:53

If I get what your trying to do, try this:

print(" ".join(map(str, final)))
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got an error. right now it's printing like this [4444, 4444] and i want it to print 4444 4444 –  rs19 Nov 6 '13 at 15:24
    
@rs19: What error? Did you try the code? –  Linuxios Nov 6 '13 at 15:24
1  
This doesn't work if the elements of final aren't strings –  UpAndAdam Nov 6 '13 at 15:25
    
@UpAndAdam, rs19: See edit. –  Linuxios Nov 6 '13 at 15:26
    
works now! thanks. –  rs19 Nov 6 '13 at 15:27

Based on your comment to an earlier answer, you need this:

print(' '.join(str(x) for x in final))

This converts each of the elements in final to a string before joining them with a space between.

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Try this: print(" ".join(list_you_want_to_print))

str.join(iterable) will return a string with the items in the utterable separated by the string.

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This doesn't work if the elements of final aren't strings –  UpAndAdam Nov 6 '13 at 15:30
    
@UpAndAdam, you're right. You can use map(str, list_to_print) to change everything to a string. –  reem Nov 6 '13 at 20:17

Borrows from what others pointed out from my comments adds something many have missed that was previously in one of the answers:

  1. (For pre python 3.0:) You will want to use raw_input instead of input because you just want to capture not evaluate.
    Per 2.7.5 docs:

    input(prompt) is equivalent to eval(raw_input(prompt))

  2. Printing ( mostly lifted from Jon C's answer) Make them strings and join them:

    print(' '.join(map(str, your_list)))
    

    Even better (if you're using Python 3.x) to avoid explicit conversation:

    print(*your_list)
    
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