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I'm not sure if this has been asked before, but I really didn't know how to look for it, as I am not exactly sure what this thing / what I'm trying to do is exactly called...

I have an delegate-based messaging generic system that I use in Unity3D - taken from here.

[UA Crosslink]

It is used like this:

 // Writing an event listener

    void OnSpeedChanged(float speed)
    {
        this.speed = speed;
    }

// Registering an event listener

    void OnEnable()
    {
        Messenger<float>.AddListener("speed changed", OnSpeedChanged);
    }

// Unregistering an event listener

    void OnDisable()
    {
        Messenger<float>.RemoveListener("speed changed", OnSpeedChanged);
    }

The problem I'm having, is that the code is currently very un-DRY (there's a lot of copy paste), and I want to DRY it, by hopefully parametrizing it, making it more generic.

I will post the relevant code - Please note that you don't really have to understand the code in detail and what's its doing, in order to answer.

Here's a class that does stuff behind the scene:

static internal class MessengerInternal
{
    static public Dictionary<string, Delegate> eventTable = new Dictionary<string, Delegate>();
    static public readonly MessengerMode DEFAULT_MODE = MessengerMode.REQUIRE_LISTENER;

    static public void OnListenerAdding(string eventType, Delegate listenerBeingAdded)
    {
        if (!eventTable.ContainsKey(eventType)) {
            eventTable.Add(eventType, null);
        }

        Delegate d = eventTable[eventType];
        if (d != null && d.GetType() != listenerBeingAdded.GetType()) {
            throw new ListenerException(string.Format("Attempting to add listener with inconsistent signature for event type {0}. Current listeners have type {1} and listener being added has type {2}", eventType, d.GetType().Name, listenerBeingAdded.GetType().Name));
        }
    }

    static public void OnListenerRemoving(string eventType, Delegate listenerBeingRemoved)
    {
        if (eventTable.ContainsKey(eventType)) {
            Delegate d = eventTable[eventType];

            if (d == null) {
                throw new ListenerException(string.Format("Attempting to remove listener with for event type {0} but current listener is null.", eventType));
            }
            else if (d.GetType() != listenerBeingRemoved.GetType()) {
                throw new ListenerException(string.Format("Attempting to remove listener with inconsistent signature for event type {0}. Current listeners have type {1} and listener being removed has type {2}", eventType, d.GetType().Name, listenerBeingRemoved.GetType().Name));
            }
        }
        else {
            throw new ListenerException(string.Format("Attempting to remove listener for type {0} but Messenger doesn't know about this event type.", eventType));
        }
    }

    static public void OnListenerRemoved(string eventType)
    {
        if (eventTable[eventType] == null) {
            eventTable.Remove(eventType);
        }
    }

    static public void OnBroadcasting(string eventType, MessengerMode mode)
    {
        if (mode == MessengerMode.REQUIRE_LISTENER && !eventTable.ContainsKey(eventType)) {
            throw new BroadcastException(string.Format("Broadcasting message {0} but no listener found.", eventType));
        }
    }
}

Now, I have generic messenger classes, that have either one, two, three or even no arguments - So the user could choose a suitable event handler to subscribe to an event.

Here's the version, that takes no generic arguments:

// No parameters
static public class Messenger {
    private static Dictionary<string, Delegate> eventTable = MessengerInternal.eventTable;

    static public void AddListener(string eventType, Callback handler) {
        MessengerInternal.OnListenerAdding(eventType, handler);
        eventTable[eventType] = (Callback)eventTable[eventType] + handler;
    }

    static public void RemoveListener(string eventType, Callback handler) {
        MessengerInternal.OnListenerRemoving(eventType, handler);   
        eventTable[eventType] = (Callback)eventTable[eventType] - handler;
        MessengerInternal.OnListenerRemoved(eventType);
    }

    static public void Broadcast(string eventType) {
        Broadcast(eventType, MessengerInternal.DEFAULT_MODE);
    }

    static public void Broadcast(string eventType, MessengerMode mode) {
        MessengerInternal.OnBroadcasting(eventType, mode);
        Delegate d;
        if (eventTable.TryGetValue(eventType, out d)) {
            Callback callback = d as Callback;
            if (callback != null) {
                callback();
            } else {
                throw MessengerInternal.CreateBroadcastSignatureException(eventType);
            }
        }
    }
}

Here's the version that takes one arg, (I just copy paste and add a T):

// One parameter
static public class Messenger<T> {
    private static Dictionary<string, Delegate> eventTable = MessengerInternal.eventTable;

    static public void AddListener(string eventType, Callback<T> handler) {
        MessengerInternal.OnListenerAdding(eventType, handler);
        eventTable[eventType] = (Callback<T>)eventTable[eventType] + handler;
    }

    static public void RemoveListener(string eventType, Callback<T> handler) {
        MessengerInternal.OnListenerRemoving(eventType, handler);
        eventTable[eventType] = (Callback<T>)eventTable[eventType] - handler;
        MessengerInternal.OnListenerRemoved(eventType);
    }

    static public void Broadcast(string eventType, T arg1) {
        Broadcast(eventType, arg1, MessengerInternal.DEFAULT_MODE);
    }

    static public void Broadcast(string eventType, T arg1, MessengerMode mode) {
        MessengerInternal.OnBroadcasting(eventType, mode);
        Delegate d;
        if (eventTable.TryGetValue(eventType, out d)) {
            Callback<T> callback = d as Callback<T>;
            if (callback != null) {
                callback(arg1);
            } else {
                throw MessengerInternal.CreateBroadcastSignatureException(eventType);
            }
        }
    }
}

As you might have already guessed, the one that takes two args, I just copy paste again, and add another generic type, like <T, U> etc.

This is the part that I'm trying to eliminate - But yet I have no idea how. More accurately, what I'm looking for is: Only one Messenger class, but yet I am able to do:

Messenger<float>.Subscribe("player dead", OnDead);
Messenger<int, bool>.Subscribe("on something", OnSomething);
Messenger<bool, float, MyType>.Subscribe( stuff );

Or, (doesn't really matter which)

Messenger.Subscribe<float> ("player dead", OnDead);

You got the idea...

How can I do that, how can I write a generic messenger, that when I want to add yet another generic arg, I don't have to copy-paste and write a whole other version, just cause I needed an extra arg?

Thanks a lot!

share|improve this question
    
Thanks. I haven't heard of the MVVM. I'm looking at it now. This is not my code, it's from Unity's wiki. I'm not sure if this MVVM thing is suitable in Unity. I didn't wanna add a Unity3d tag cause really the problem isn't unity-related. –  vexe Nov 6 '13 at 15:42
    
@HighCore btw what's the problem if a C# code looks too java? The two languages are similar in a lot of ways. What's disgusting about that? –  vexe Nov 6 '13 at 15:47
1  
The two languages are similar - Yes, in 2001 that was true. But it's 2013 now. C# has grown up. java has not. seeing java code makes a C# developer vomit in 2013. Much more so if it's really C# code written by a java programmer. –  HighCore Nov 6 '13 at 15:48
3  
Otherwise, good luck reinventing the wheel. see ya dat attitude....... - Not sure if you don't wanna help, or can't. I have a simple (should be) problem, and I want to know how to solve it. I don't want already-made stuff. I want to learn. If you can help solve the problem, I'd appreciate it, if you can't/don't want to, just cause the code looks disgusting then I really think we shouldn't take these comments any further cause it's getting long and off-topic. Thanks. –  vexe Nov 6 '13 at 16:42
1  
@vexe take it easy. Maybe you should look at C# events to make C# evanglists happy ;-) –  Kay Nov 6 '13 at 18:06

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You have a messenger but you don't seem to be sending any messages! You are trying to send the contents without a proper envelope. Wrap the values you want to send out in a class that represents your actual message and you can then subscribe to the type of the message which will contain all the values you were trying to send.

public class PlayerSpeedChangedMessage {
    public Guid PlayerId { get; set; }
    public int OldSpeed { get; set; }
    public int NewSpeed { get; set; }
}

public class MyMessageHandler {

    public MyMessageHandler() {
        Messenger<PlayerSpeedChangedMessage>.Subscribe(OnDead);
    }

    HandleSpeedChange(PlayerSpeedChangedMessage message) {
        // Do stuff with the message
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Mike, this is what I actually ended up doing - I found a system that does that - similar to the built-in event handling system in C#, but the cool thing about it is that objects don't have to know about each other to subscribe - See my comment here answers.unity3d.com/questions/570483/… –  vexe Nov 8 '13 at 8:14

I think for C# developers that Message class on the wiki is a little out-moded. C# and even Unity itself has a fairly nice messaging system already in place (As long as your needs aren't too complex). Check out SendMessage and BroadcastMessage.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your reply, but the Unity messaging system is a bit slow - But it is useful sometimes. Never used it though. See this comparison forum.unity3d.com/threads/… –  vexe Nov 8 '13 at 8:15

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